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  • Deaths

    Jennifer Kee Anderson ... Joel M. Dexter ... William H. “Doc” Pirkle ... Pola Fotitch Triandis 

     

  • Media advisory: Audio and visual recording allowed at April 17 Chancellor’s Critical Conversations event

    News media attending the April 17 Chancellor’s Critical Conversations event will be allowed to record content from the session.

  • Media advisory: Day of Service events planned for April 14

    News reporters interested in covering the sixth annual Day of Caring meal packaging event Saturday, April 14, are encouraged to go to Memorial Stadium between 10 a.m. and noon.

  • Faculty, staff and teaching assistants honored with Campus Awards for Excellence in Instruction

    The University of Illinois is honoring 21 faculty and staff members and graduate teaching assistants for excellence in teaching, mentoring and advising.

  • Study explores carbohydrates’ impact on head, neck cancers

    Consuming high amounts of carbohydrates and various forms of sugar during the year prior to treatment for head and neck cancer may increase patients’ risks of cancer recurrence and mortality, a new study reports.

  • Spurlock Museum Third Thursday Series: ‘University of Illinois Wheelchair Athletics'

    On Thursday, April 19 at 4 p.m., Spurlock Museum of World Cultures at Illinois presents the talk “University of Illinois Wheelchair Athletics: A Tradition of Excellence.” Adam Bleakney, the head coachof men's and women's track, field and racing, and Stephanie Wheeler, the head coach of women’s basketball, will discuss the program’s roots, its legacy and its continuing leadership and success in wheelchair sports. 

  • Sloan Foundation grant continuation to help U. of I. improve STEM minority representation

    The University of Illinois has received a three-year, $1 million grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to continue funding for the Sloan University Center of Exemplary Mentoring at Illinois. The program, started in 2015, supports underrepresented minority doctoral students in science, technology, engineering and math fields and is one of nine UCEMs throughout the country.

  • Spurlock Museum Third Thursday Series: ‘Inside Allerton’

    Who was Robert Allerton, the creator of the English-style country house, grounds and sculpture park in central Illinois? Author Maureen Holtz will share insights about the life and estates of Allerton, called “Chicago’s Richest Bachelor” by the Chicago Tribune in 1906. The event is Thursday, May 17, at Spurlock Museum of World Cultures at Illinois, 600 S. Gregory St., Urbana. Allerton’s Monticello, Illinois, estate, now owned by the U. of I., is listed as one of the state’s Seven Wonders, and his Kauai, Hawaii, estate, Lawai-Kai, is now a botanical garden.

  • Illinois architecture professor designs transformable, adaptive structures

    University of Illinois architecture professor Sudarshan Krishnan designs lightweight and transformable structures that can expand and collapse to adapt to a user’s needs.

  • ‘Ebertfest’ adds musical performance to follow final film ‘Rumble’

    This year’s “Ebertfest” will close with a performance by Native American artist Pura Fe following its final film, “Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked the World.”

  • Double the traps, double the turkeys

    I scan the woods around me, carefully eyeing the tree-line through the darkened windows on each side of my blind. I see no turkeys and go back to reading my book. After a few pages, I glance up again and jump in surprise as turkeys emerge over a hill in the field to my right. They are about 40 feet from the Netblaster. I text my crew to let them know our prey has arrived!

  • Deaths

    Clinton Frederick Fink ... John T. Scott ... Helen T. Smith ... Al Ricco John Stasi

  • Journalists Balz and Simon part of April 12 panel on Trump-era political reporting

    Political reporting in the Trump era will be the subject of a panel discussion April 12 featuring the Washington Post’s Dan Balz and columnist Roger Simon.

  • Six academic professionals honored with CAPE awards

    Six employees are recipients of the 2018 Chancellor's Academic Professional Excellence awards, which recognize academic professionals for their work, personal and professional contributions.

  • New camera gives surgeons a butterfly’s-eye view of cancer

    Cancer lurking in tissue could be more easily found when looking through a butterfly’s eye.

  • Geography professor awarded Guggenheim Fellowship

    University of Illinois professor of geography Jesse Ribot has been awarded a 2018 Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship.

  • Washington University expert on religion, politics to give Thulin Lecture in Religion

    R. Marie Griffith, the director of the John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics at Washington University in St. Louis, will talk about political and religious disagreements surrounding sex when she delivers the annual Majorie Hall Thulin Lecture in Religion at the University of Illinois.

  • Illini Emergency Medical Services honored at national event

    Illini Emergency Medical Services, a program of the Illinois Fire Service Institute at Illinois, will be honored by the Congressional Fire Services Institute and Masimo, a medical device manufacturer, for excellence in emergency medical services. IEMS will receive the 2018 Excellence in Fire Service-based Emergency Medical Services Award at the 30th annual National Fire and Emergency Services Dinner on April 19 in Washington, D.C.

  • Willard Airport switches to a new parking system

    A new, automated system that allows flyers to pay for parking with credit cards has replaced the parking booth at the University of Illinois Willard Airport. Customers who wish to pay with cash may pay for parking inside the terminal.

  • Shrimp-inspired camera may enable underwater navigation

    The underwater environment may appear to the human eye as a dull-blue, featureless space. However, a vast landscape of polarization patterns appear when viewed through a camera that is designed to see the world through the eyes of many of the animals that inhabit the water. 

  • Fourth-wettest February-March on record in Illinois

    The statewide average precipitation for February-March was 8.69 inches, which made it the fourth-wettest February-March on record, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel of the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

     

  • Website celebrates achievements of University of Illinois women

    A new website celebrates the achievements women have made during the University of Illinois’ 150-year history.

  • Image of Research: Bare Witness

    Deaths from homicides, accidents, disasters or armed conflicts can result in unknown human remains that require identification before further investigation. To identify these remains, an anthropologist can piece together details about a person’s life from their bones. The accuracy of such anthropological methods depends on the diversity of available skeletal research collections, of which there are few around the world. 

  • August and December 2017 graduates, Dean's List honorees named

    More than 4,100 students received degrees last August and December from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and 7,845 students earned Dean’s List status.

  • Professor makes legal case for schools to challenge cyberbullies

    Schools have a limited ability to challenge cyberbullies, but an Illinois professor has made a legal study on how to change that.

  • Paper: Surprise can be an agent of social change

    Surprising someone – whether it’s by a joke or via a gasp-inducing plot twist – can be a memorable experience, but a less heralded effect is that it can provide an avenue to influence people, said Jeffrey Loewenstein, a professor of business administration at the Gies College of Business at Illinois.

  • ‘Chancellor’s Critical Conversations’ series kicks off with Native imagery discussion

    The “Chancellor’s Critical Conversations” series of discussions will begin with a session on native imagery April 10, followed by an April 17 conversation on the topic of free speech.

  • Image of Research: You are what you eat

    As a chef-turned-nutritional neuroscientist, I explore how the food we eat impacts the way we think. As a part of my graduate training, I design dietary interventions.

    The “cupcakes” in the image above are actually not cupcakes at all. They’re 90 percent egg powder with a dash of sugar and flour. In academic speak, they’re “tightly controlled isocaloric vessels of lutein that will serve as the intervention of a randomized control trial in preadolescents with below-average retinal lutein levels.”

  • Artists at Krannert Art Museum want you to use your ears as well as your eyes

    Artists Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou-Rahme want you to listen to, and not just look at, their work on view at Krannert Art Museum.

  • ‘Ebertfest’ final slate includes ‘Interstellar’ in 70mm, ‘Indians who rocked the world’

    “Interstellar” in 70mm coming to 20th annual “Ebertfest,” as well as documentary on the role of American Indians in rock music.

  • Could a citizenship question alter the 2020 census results?

    A citizenship question on the 2020 census could add to existing undercounts, says an Illinois professor who serves on a Census Bureau advisory committee

  • Image of Research: Kinetic structures

    As an architecture student, I came across a whole new world of kinetic structures. I learned that almost any form can be given mobility and deployed by calculating its geometry accurately and by strategically selecting the joints to allow rotation.

  • Federal officials urged to increase perinatal depression treatment in minority women

    Federal funding is needed to improve diagnosis and treatment of perinatal depression in Latina and black women, according to University of Illinois kinesiology and community health professor Sandraluz Lara-Cinisomo. 

  • Optimistic Latinos have healthier hearts, study finds

    Latinos who are the most optimistic are more likely to have healthy hearts, according to a new study of more than 4,900 Latinos in the U.S. led by University of Illinois social work professor Rosalba Hernandez.

  • Deaths

    Kathleen L. Hornaday ... Mary Katherine Newman ... Charles P. Slichter

  • Researchers develop model to show how bacteria grow in plumbing systems

    Bacteria in tap water can multiply when a faucet isn’t used for a few days, such as when a house is vacant over a week’s vacation, a new study from University of Illinois engineers found. The study suggests a new method to show how microbial communities, including those responsible for illnesses like Legionnaires’ disease, may assemble inside the plumbing systems of homes and public buildings

  • 20th Ebert Film Fest adds ‘The Big Lebowski’ to lineup, with ‘The Dude’ as guest

    “The Big Lebowski” is coming to the 20th annual “Ebertfest,” along with the man who inspired the movie’s central character, “The Dude,” as a guest.

  • Switzky named first director of Siebel Center for Design

    Rachel Switzky has been selected as the inaugural director of the Siebel Center for Design at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, pending approval by the University of Illinois Board of Trustees. Switzky, who earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in industrial design at Illinois, will begin the new role June 18. 

  • ‘Gathering’ concert series features new music to celebrate sesquicentennial

    The University of Illinois Wind Symphony and Chamber Singers will perform a new composition written to celebrate the U. of I.’s sesquicentennial in April concerts at New York City’s Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts and at Urbana’s Krannert Center for the Performing Arts.

  • WorldFest Celebration of Performing Arts

    Spurlock Museum of World Cultures invites visitors of all ages to the 12th annual WorldFest celebration on Sunday, April 8, from 1-4 p.m. Experience performing arts from around the world and hands-on crafts. Admission is free. The museum is located at 600 S. Gregory St., Urbana. Parking is free in lot D-22 in non-reserved spaces. 

  • Interdisciplinary theater piece gives glimpse into world of quantum physics

    “Quantum Voyages,” an interdisciplinary theater piece created by University of Illinois physics and theatre professors, gives a glimpse into the strange world of quantum physics.

  • Gender differences in vocational interests decrease with age, study finds

    Gender differences in vocational interests increase drastically during puberty but tend to decrease across the lifespan, researchers at the University of Illinois found in a new study.

  • Experts to answer questions about preserving historical objects

    Have you wondered how to preserve an old film of family memories or take proper care of grandma’s quilt? Bring your small items or come with images of larger pieces to the Preservation Emporium at Spurlock Museum of World Cultures at Illinois on Saturday, April 7, from 1-4 p.m., and have your preservation questions answered by experts.

  • Team brings subatomic resolution to computational microscope

    Scientists have built a “computational microscope” that can simulate the atomic and subatomic forces that drive molecular interactions. This tool will streamline efforts to understand the chemistry of life, model large molecular systems and develop new pharmaceutical and industrial agents, the researchers say.

  • Deaths

    Joanne Daugherty Hayes ... Mildred Alene Maddock Landreth ... Vivian Phyllis Larson ... Michele Henriette Miller ... Rosemary Rutledge ... Nancy Jean Stark 

  • Soil temperatures and moisture levels declining in early March

    Cooler, drier weather has led to declining soil temperatures and moisture levels, according to Jennie Atkins, Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring Program manager at the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

  • Decision-making is shaped by individual differences in the functional brain connectome

    Each day brings with it a host of decisions to be made, and each person approaches those decisions differently. A new study by University of Illinois researchers found that these individual differences are associated with variation in specific brain networks – particularly those related to executive, social and perceptual processes.

  • Deaths

    Etha Jereen Broom ... Constance “Connie” Ellen Brown ... Carole Couch ... Sue Jones ... Maurice “Doc” Mecum ... Emily Ann Stipes Watts 

     

     

  • Native Pop artist collective brings a weekend of events

    Native Pop, an organization that brings American Indian pop art and art making to widespread venues and communities, will present a weekend of events March 30-31 titled “Native Pop Presents: Strong Women: Reclaiming Imagery.” The events feature MaryBeth Nelson (Cherokee), Serena Penaloza (Navajo and Maricopa) and Brent Learned (Cheyenne-Arapaho), who will bring their art, insight and skills to a variety of programs.

     

  • Researchers demonstrate existence of new form of electronic matter

    Researchers have produced a “human scale” demonstration of a new phase of matter called quadrupole topological insulators that was recently predicted using theoretical physics. These are the first experimental findings to validate this theory.