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  • Deaths

    Amy M. Blue-Short ... Joyce A. Butsch ... Kenneth Morris Davidson ... Virginia Guthrie ... Jean M. Jessee ... Ralph A. Smith ... William Murphy Tilton ... Harry C. Triandis ... Sherry Marie Weaver ... Jefferey “Jeff” Allen Welch

  • Study: Irritable bowel syndrome may be underdiagnosed in athletes

    Gastrointestinal problems are common among endurance athletes, and many of them may be struggling with undiagnosed irritable bowel syndrome, a new study by University of Illinois food scientists suggests.

  • Bannon named executive director of Willard Airport

    Tim Bannon will become the executive director of the University of Illinois Willard Airport in Savoy. Bannon, currently serving as the airport’s interim executive director, replaces Gene Cossey, who left in February for a similar position in Tennessee.

  • Rare Book and Manuscript Library exhibit to feature typewriters used by Hefner, Ebert, Sandburg

    A Rare Book and Manuscript Library exhibit will showcase typewriters used by Hugh Hefner, Roger Ebert, Carl Sandburg and James Jones.

  • What happened at Stonewall 50 years ago? And why did it matter?

    An Illinois historian describes how everything changed for those involved in the Stonewall riots 50 years ago, and the event’s place in the history of gay rights.

  • Garrick selected campus's first vice chancellor for diversity, equity and inclusion

    The U. of I. selected Sean Garrick to the new senior-level position of vice chancellor for diversity, equity and inclusion, pending approval by the Board of Trustees.

  • Commission on Native Imagery report released

    The final report from the Chancellor’s Commission on Native Imagery: Healing and Reconciliation's is available online.

  • 'The College Years of a Catholic Radical: Dorothy Day, University of Illinois Dropout'

    “The College Years of a Catholic Radical: Dorothy Day, University of Illinois Dropout,” scheduled for July 18 at 4 p.m. at Spurlock Museum of World Cultures, 500 S. Gregory St., Urbana, illuminates Day’s experiences as a U. of I. student, their impact on her later work and the legacy of Day’s presence on campus.

  • Deaths

    John C. Hough Jr. ... Janet D. Knesek (nee Scott) ... Joseph “Joe” Konitzki ... Richard Newport Wright III 

  • Researchers develop fast, efficient way to build amino acid chains

    Researchers report that they have developed a faster, easier and cheaper method for making new amino acid chains – the polypeptide building blocks that are used in drug development and industry – than was previously available. The new approach purifies the amino acid precursors and builds the polypeptides at the same time, unlike previous methods in which the processes were separate, laborious and time-consuming.

  • Free Research Park concert features Alma Afrobeat Ensemble

    Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Fox/Atkins Development LLC and the University of Illinois present a free summer concert featuring the Barcelona, Spain-based Alma Afrobeat Ensembleat 7:30 p.m. Friday, July 19, in Research Park.

  • Last month the third-wettest May in Illinois history

    Some areas of Illinois experienced record-breaking amounts of rain in May, as statewide totals mark the sixth consecutive month with above average rainfall, according to Brian Kerschner, a spokesperson for the Illinois State Climatologist Office at the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

  • 'Citizen scientists' help track foxes, coyotes in urban areas

    As foxes and coyotes adapt to urban landscapes, the potential for encounters with humans necessarily goes up. A team of scientists is taking advantage of this fact to enlist the eyeballs and fingertips of humans – getting them to report online what they see in their own neighborhoods and parks.

  • 'Fall to pieces: Ingenious mechanical puzzles from around the world'

    Through the centuries, people have devised imaginative puzzles to test our wits. Three-dimensional puzzles crafted of wood, metal, plastic and other durable materials are designed to be taken apart, rearranged or untangled. The exhibit “Fall to pieces: Ingenious mechanical puzzles from around the world,” debuts June 4 at Spurlock Museum of World Cultures and runs through July 21.

  • U. of I. student selected for Fulbright Summer Institute in London

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — University of Illinois freshman Ari Kelo, a graduate of Northside College Preparatory High School in Chicago, will join a three-week summer program at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre in London as part of the Fulbright Summer Institute, an initiative of the U.S.-U.K. Fulbright Commission.

  • University of Illinois students receive Critical Language Scholarships

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Two University of Illinois undergraduates have been awarded U.S. Department of State Critical Language Scholarshipsto study critical languages during the summer of 2019.

  • Deaths

    John “Jack” L. Hayes Jr. ... Wilma J. Parsons ... Jim Schuster

  • Study: Teens at greater risk of violence, injury during sexual assaults than previously thought

    In a recent study of the forensic evidence in 563 sexual assault cases, U. of I. researchers found “striking similarities” in the types of injuries and violence experienced by adult and adolescent victims.

  • Discovering treasures in Library’s storage vaults

    The University Library’s Oak Street Library Facility stores more than 4 million volumes in climate-controlled storage vaults.

  • Does the Supreme Court need to care about public opinion?

    The Supreme Court has to consider public opinion and its popularity in deciding politically divisive cases, says a University of Illinois political scientist.

  • 'Fettuccine' may be most obvious sign of life on Mars, researchers report

    A rover scanning the surface of Mars for evidence of life might want to check for rocks that look like pasta, researchers report in the journal Astrobiology.

    The bacterium that controls the formation of such rocks on Earth is ancient and thrives in harsh environments that are similar to conditions on Mars, said University of Illinois geology professor Bruce Fouke, who led the new, NASA-funded study.

  • Faculty and Staff Emergency Fund seeks donations

    Crisis knows no season, and for as little as $5 per month, faculty members and staff can make a difference in the life of a co-worker in crisis.

  • New mutations for herbicide resistance rarer than expected, study finds

    New evidence suggests that the mutation rate in amaranth – a group that includes several agricultural weeds – is quite low and that low-level exposure to herbicides contributes little, if anything, to the onset of herbicide-resistant mutations in this group.

  • Digital publishing projects examine Jay-Z's music, Edward P. Jones' fiction

    Analyses of Jay-Z’s music and Edward P. Jones’ fiction are among the first projects of Publishing Without Walls, a University of Illinois digital publishing initiative for humanities scholars.

  • Faculty members receive Provost’s Campus Distinguished Promotion Award

    Eleven faculty members were honored with the Provost’s Campus Distinguished PromotionAward for 2019.

  • Deaths

    Katharine “Kay” Oline Aston ... “Carol” Margadene Bateman ... Lucille “Lucy” L. Finn ... Joseph A. Garza ... Gerald “Jerry” E. Miner Jr. ... Shirley Bash Rittenhouse ... Louis Allen Walthall

  • Artificial photosynthesis transforms carbon dioxide into liquefiable fuels

    Chemists at the University of Illinois have successfully produced fuels using water, carbon dioxide and visible light through artificial photosynthesis. By converting carbon dioxide into more complex molecules like propane, green energy technology is now one step closer to using excess CO2 to store solar energy – in the form of chemical bonds – for use when the sun is not shining and in times of peak demand.

  • Illinois student named Yenching Scholar at Peking University

    Gabriel Wacks is the first University of Illinois student accepted into Peking University’s Yenching Academy. Along with about 125 scholars from more than 40 countries, he will enroll this fall in an interdisciplinary master’s degree program in China studies.

  • Soils are warming and drying in mid-May

    After a cooling spell last weekend, soil temperatures are once again rising in Illinois, according to Jennie Atkins, Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring Program manager at the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

  • Polymers jump through hoops on pathway to sustainable materials

    Recyclable plastics that contain ring-shaped polymers may be a key to developing sustainable synthetic materials. Despite some promising advances, researchers said, a full understanding of how to processes ring polymers into practical materials remains elusive. In a new study, researchers identified a mechanism called “threading” that takes place when a polymer is stretched – a behavior not witnessed before. This new insight may lead to new processing methods for sustainable polymer materials.

  • Deaths

    Robert W. McCleary

  • U of I System transfers Research Park oversight to Urbana campus

    The University of Illinois Board of Trustees today transferred oversight of the University of Illinois Research Park from the U. of I. System to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  • Illinois student honored with Goldwater scholarship

    U. of I. student Philip Kocheril of Champaign was awarded a Barry M. Goldwater scholarship for the 2019-20 and 2020-21 academic years.

  • Media Advisory: Willard Airport hosts emergency drill Monday

    Emergency responders will take part in a full-scale emergency exercise at Willard Airport in Savoy on Monday, May 20, beginning at 6 p.m. The exercise will not affect scheduled air travel.

  • Perceived union support buoys 'meaningfulness of work' measures

    When employees think of their labor union as supportive and caring, says new research co-written by U. of I. labor professor M. Teresa Cardador, they are more likely to rate their union as fulfilling their psychological needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness – all of which are related to enhanced work meaningfulness.

  • Archivist discusses first African American chemistry PhD

    Illinois alumnus St. Elmo Brady was the first African American to obtain a doctorate in chemistry in the U.S. He received his degree in 1916 for work completed at Noyes Laboratory and continued his career as a professor of chemistry at historically black colleges and universities. Brady was recently honored for his accomplishment by the American Chemical Society through the designation of a national historic chemical landmark.

  • Receiving weekend food improves school attendance among children living with hunger

    Participating in a food-distribution program that provides children from food-insecure households with backpacks of meals for the weekend improves their school attendance on Fridays, a new study found.

  • Deaths

    Janice Lynn Allen ... Donald Chien-Tao Chiang ... Doris M. Downs ... Max Elmer Reid ... Helen Louise (Camp) Ridlen

  • 'Engineering Fire' documentary premieres on BTN

    “Engineering Fire,” 30-minute documentary video chronicling the work of University of Illinois engineers to introduce a solar-cooking device in Haiti, premieres May 12 at 7 p.m. CDT on the Big Ten Network.

  • Krannert Center for the Performing Arts announces 50th season of performances

    Krannert Center for the Performing Arts will present its 50th season of performances in 2019-20.

  • Illinois Fire Service Institute training showcase May 15

    The Office of the State Fire Marshal will host the Illinois Fire Service Institute Training Showcase on May 15 outside the Illinois state Capitol in Springfield. The event will provide state legislators with an in-depth look at the training efforts for firefighters taking place throughout the state.

  • What changes should be made to modernize consumer bankruptcy law?

    The primary reason why current bankruptcy law doesn’t work well is that it dates back to 1978, before the explosion of consumer credit, says Robert M. Lawless, the Max L. Rowe Professor of Law at Illinois and a leading consumer credit and bankruptcy expert. Lawless served as reporter for the American Bankruptcy Institute’s Commission on Consumer Bankruptcy, which recommended several changes to the law.

  • Three faculty members honored with Campus Awards for Excellence in Faculty Leadership

    The Office of the Provost honored three University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign faculty members May 7 with Campus Awards for Excellence in Faculty Leadership.

  • Emerging Contaminants in the Environment Conference is May 21-22

    The 2019 Emerging Contaminants in the Environment Conference is May 21-22 at the Hilton Garden Inn in Champaign. This year the conference will expand beyond the aquatic environment to include air and soil studies, along with the effects of contaminants on human and animal health.

  • Deaths

    Tom Battershell ... Jeannine W. Corlas ... Keith Randall Erickson ... Philip Clayton Mitchell ... Shirley J. Smith.

  • The Center for Advanced Study announces the Associates, Fellows and Beckman Fellows for 2019-20.

    The Center for Advanced Study announces the Associates, Fellows and Beckman Fellows for 2019-20.

  • April showers prompted continued flood concerns in Illinois

    A wet April extended the trend for above-average precipitation in Illinois. This year was the seventh-wettest December-to-April period on record, according to Brian Kerschner, a spokesperson for the Illinois State Climatologist Office at the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

  • Mechanics, chemistry and biomedical research join forces for noninvasive tissue therapy

    A fortuitous conversation between two University of Illinois scientists has opened a new line of communication between biomedical researchers and the tissues they study. The new findings, reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, show that high-intensity focused ultrasound waves can penetrate biological tissue to activate molecules able to perform specific tasks.

  • Researchers find protein that suppresses muscle repair in mice

    Researchers report that a protein known to be important to protein synthesis also influences muscle regeneration and regrowth in an unexpected manner. The discovery, reported in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, could one day lead to new methods for treating disorders that result in muscle weakness and loss of muscle mass, the researchers said.

  • Professor’s history of Coca-Cola also tells larger story of globalization

    Coca-Cola’s history is one of innovation in image-making, outsourcing and other now-common practices of global capitalism – and of adapting to challenges from activists and movements resisting its practices, says an Illinois professor in a new book.