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  • The researchers stand in a field at the U. of I. Energy Farm.

    Study identifies best bioenergy crops for sustainable aviation fuels by U.S. region, policy goals

    Researchers analyzed the financial and environmental costs and benefits of four biofuels crops used to produce sustainable aviation fuels in the U.S. They found that each feedstock — corn stover, energy sorghum, miscanthus or switchgrass — performed best in a specific region of the rainfed United States. Their study will help growers and policymakers select the feedstocks most suited to meeting goals like reducing production costs, lowering greenhouse gas emissions and building soil carbon stocks.

  • Communication professor Charee Thompson, Dr. Tiffani Dillard and communication professor Mardia Bishop in a patient exam room

    Virtual reality training for physicians aims to heal disparities in Black maternal health care

    A new virtual reality training series being co-developed by researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign teaches medical students about implicit bias in health care and the ways it harms Black patients and contributes to race-based health disparities.

  • An overhead view of a large landslide showing a detachment and numerous land fractures

    Researchers clarify how soft materials fail under stress

    Understanding how soft materials fail under stress is critical for solving engineering challenges as disparate as pharmaceutical technology and landslide prevention. A new study linking a spectrum of soft material behaviors — previously thought to be unrelated — led researchers to identify a new parameter they call the brittility factor, which allows them to simplify soft material failure behavior. This will ultimately help engineers design better materials that meet future challenges.

  • Humanities students build bridges to strong communities

    Doctoral student in humanities participating in community-based project to bring awareness to food sourcing and sustainable agriculture.

     

  • Ying Bao, a professor of business administration at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

    Study: Consumption-tracking technology mixed bag for consumers

    Consumption tracking technologies meant to head off consumer penalty fees offer the promise providing an early-warning system to consumers about potentially incurring penalty fees, but also may instill a false sense of security among consumers who are only partially cognizant of their own forgetfulness, says Ying Bao, a professor of business administration at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

  • Lauren R. Aronson, a clinical professor and the director of the Immigration Law Clinic at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign College of Law.

    How significant is the Biden administration’s new immigration executive order?

    The new executive order from the Biden administration aimed at protecting the undocumented spouses and children of U.S. citizens from deportation will benefit upwards of half a million unauthorized immigrants, meaning it’s more focused on family unity than the “mass amnesty” some critics have portrayed it as, says Lauren R. Aronson, a clinical professor and the director of the Immigration Law Clinic at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign College of Law.

  • Elliott named new dean of Gies College of Business

    W. Brooke Elliott has been selected as dean of Gies College of Business and the Josef and Margot Lakonishok Professor in Business, pending approval by the U. of I. Board of Trustees. Until officially approved, her title will be dean of Gies College of Business and Josef and Margot Lakonishok Professor in Business designate. The appointment will begin Aug. 16.

  • A man stands, arms crossed, in front of a banner with cellular imagery

    How do drugs like Ozempic work for weight loss?

    New weight-loss drugs like those sold under the names Ozempic and Wegovy can be life-changing for those with type 2 diabetes or severe obesity, but are not the best choice for those only looking to lose a few pounds, says Patrick Sweeney, a University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign professor of molecular and integrative physiology. 

  • Two men look at cell images on a screen

    Light targets cells for death and triggers immune response with laser precision

    A new method of precisely targeting troublesome cells for death using light could unlock new understanding of and treatments for cancer and inflammatory diseases, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign researchers report.

  • Pinholster named new dean of College of Fine and Applied Arts

    Following a national search, Jacob Pinholster has been selected as dean of the College of Fine and Applied Arts, effective Sept. 16, pending University of Illinois Board of Trustees approval. Pinholster’s title will be dean of the College of Fine and Applied Arts designate until board approval.

  • Team members, from left, first author Sehyun Ju, professor Kelly Bost and graduate student Samantha Iwinski

    Emotional overeating fed by temperament, caregivers’ reactions to children’s emotions

    The roots of emotional overeating may be found in temperament and self-regulation of one’s emotions, but caregivers’ responses to children’s negative emotions also influence whether those as young as age 3 eat to ease their distress, according to new study by researchers at the U. of I.

  • Stacy Bennett, a professor of education policy, organization and leadership

    How is this year’s chaotic Federal Student Aid application process affecting colleges, students?

    Release of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid has been fraught with glitches and delays, according to Stacy Bennett, a professor of education policy, organization and leadership, and a senior research associate for the Office of Community College Research and Leadership. 

  • The researchers in a laboratory. Between them is a fish tank with an octopus inside that has been placed in the temporary tank for the photograph.

    From 'CyberSlug' to 'CyberOctopus': New AI explores, remembers, seeks novelty, overcomes obstacles

    By giving artificial intelligence simple associative learning rules based on the brain circuits that allow a sea slug to forage — and augmenting it with better episodic memory, like that of an octopus — scientists have built an AI that can navigate new environments, seek rewards, map landmarks and overcome obstacles.

  • Two men in front of projected microscope images.

    A heart of stone: Study defines the process of and defenses against cardiac valve calcification

    The human body has sophisticated defenses against the deposition of calcium minerals that stiffen heart tissues, researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and collaborators at UCLA Health and the University of Texas at Austin found in a new study that provides the first detailed, step-by-step documentation of how mineralization progresses.

  • Zeynep Madak-Erdogan photo portrait.

    Study links neighborhood violence, lung cancer progression

    Scientists have identified a potential driver of aggressive lung cancer tumors in patients who live in areas with high levels of violent crime. Their study found that stress responses differ between those living in neighborhoods with higher and lower levels of violent crime, and between cancerous and healthy tissues in the same individuals.

  • Photo of Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations at the Urbana campus of the University of Illinois and the director of the Labor Education Program in Chicago.

    How have the dynamics between Chicago teachers, public schools changed since 2019 strike?

    An extended strike by Chicago public school teachers seems unlikely thanks to Chicago Mayor Brandon Johnson’s union credentials, says Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois and co-author of the 2016 book “A Fight for the Soul of Public Education: The Story of the Chicago Teachers Strike.”

  • Photo of John Paul Meyers dressed in a suit and leaning toward a Victrola record player.

    Illinois scholar’s book examines how popular music connects to the past

    Popular music has a deep relationship with invoking the past, writes University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign professor of African American studies John Paul Meyers in his new book “Same Old Song: The Enduring Past in Popular Music.”

  • sociology professor Jose Atiles

    Puerto Rico’s anti-corruption laws promoted fraud by outsourcing government services

    Fraud and corruption in Puerto Rico flourished under its anti-corruption policies, which promoted the outsourcing of government services to private sector corporations, according to new research by sociology professor Jose Atiles.

  • The researchers in a laboratory.

    Gut microbes from aged mice induce inflammation in young mice, study finds

    When scientists transplanted the gut microbes of aged mice into young “germ-free” mice — raised to have no gut microbes of their own — the recipient mice experienced an increase in inflammation that parallels inflammatory processes associated with aging in humans. Young germ-free mice transplanted with microbes from other young mice had no such increase.

  • Professor Yannick Kluch standing in Memorial Stadium on the U. of I.'s Urbana-Champaign campus.

    Will the 2024 Olympic Games become the playing field for social justice protests?

    Yannick Kluch, an expert on sport as a platform for social justice protests, explores the contentious history of political protests by Olympic athletes and if the controversial Rule 50 could be invoked to saction those who make them during the 2024 Summer Games.

  • Team members Xavier Ramirez, Karen Tabb and Sandra Kopels.

    State of Illinois a leader in legislation on perinatal mental health, study says

    Despite the state of Illinois' exemplary record in advancing policies on the detection and treatment of perinatal mental health problems, more work remains to be done, according to a review of the state's policies by researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

  • Aarya Mehta gets hoisted up as he throws his arms out to the eclipse as members of the Illini Astronomical Society celebrate witnessing the historic total solar eclipse

    The Great American Eclipse and all of its magic

    Crowds of people bustle about at the Martinsville Agricultural Fairgrounds on a Monday afternoon with their eyes on the sky. The air ripples with excitement as we eagerly await our chance to witness the moon consuming the sun — a total solar eclipse!

  • Diptych image with a headshot of Corey Van Landingham and the book cover of "Reader, I."

    Illinois poet’s new book of poetry reflects on marriage, its constraints and its hopefulness

    Poet Corey Van Landingham, an English professor at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, writes about new marriage, its conventions and how it can both shrink and expand one’s world in her new collection of poems, “Reader, I.”

  • The research team standing on stairs.

    New antibiotic kills pathogenic bacteria, spares healthy gut microbes

    Researchers have developed a new antibiotic that reduced or eliminated drug-resistant bacterial infections in mouse models of acute pneumonia and sepsis while sparing healthy microbes in the mouse gut. The drug, called lolamicin, also warded off secondary infections with Clostridioides difficile, a common and dangerous hospital-associated bacterial infection, and was effective against more than 130 multidrug-resistant bacterial strains in cell culture.

  • Diptych image with book cover of "Bribed With Our Own Money" and a headshot of David Beck.

    Book details how federal government used bribery to end relationships with Native American tribes

    In a new book, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign history professor David Beck describes how the federal government used bribery to end its legal and political relationships with Native American tribes.

  • Illinois partnership with the JJK Foundation in St. Clair County set to provide more than $32 million in labor income creation throughout the state by 2026

    A study conducted by a University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign economist found that the activities of the Jackie Joyner-Kersee Foundation in St. Clair County, Illinois, will provide $32 million in labor income creation, 474 new jobs and $10.7 million in new tax revenue throughout the state of Illinois by 2026.

  • Short but severe episodes of flooding from hurricanes in Texas and Florida triggered a nationwide increase in flood insurance sign-ups depending on how socially connected a county was to the flooded counties, says new research co-written by U. of I. professor of agricultural and consumer economics Yilan Xu, left, and U. of I. graduate student Sébastien Box-Couillard.

    Study: Social networks can influence perception of climate-change risk

    Short but severe episodes of flooding from hurricanes in Texas and Florida triggered a nationwide increase in flood insurance sign-ups depending on how socially connected a county was to the flooded counties, says new research co-written by U. of I. professor of agricultural and consumer economics Yilan Xu and U. of I. graduate student Sébastien Box-Couillard.

  • Headshot of Rebecca Walker

    Green infrastructure plans need to consider historical racial inequalities, say researchers

    Urban greening projects should consider historical development patterns and past discriminatory practices to avoid exacerbating the unequal distribution of environmental benefits, says Rebecca Walker, a University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign urban and regional planning professor.

  • Graduate student Yingqi Jia, left, and professor Shelly Zhang in their lab

    Researchers introduce programmable materials to help heal broken bones

    Natural materials like bone, bird feathers and wood have an intelligent approach to physical stress distribution, despite their irregular architectures. However, the relationship between stress modulation and their structures has remained elusive. A new study that integrates machine learning, optimization, 3D printing and stress experiments allowed engineers to gain insight into these natural wonders by developing a material that replicates the functionalities of human bone for orthopedic femur restoration.

  • Portrait of researchers in a laboratory. They are sitting in front of two computer monitors displaying data and visualizations of their experiments.

    By listening, scientists learn how a protein folds

    By converting their data into sounds, scientists discovered how hydrogen bonds contribute to the lightning-fast gyrations that transform a string of amino acids into a functional, folded protein. Their report, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, offers an unprecedented view of the sequence of hydrogen-bonding events that occur when a protein morphs from an unfolded to a folded state.

  • Photo of Charles Lloyd on stage playing a saxophone, wearing a blue jacket and beret and sunglasses.

    Krannert Center for the Performing Arts announces 2024-25 season performances

    Krannert Center for the Performing Arts will feature a wide variety of performers for its 2024-25 season.

  • A colored microscope image depicting a green nerve surrounded by red and blue muscle cells.

    Nerves prompt muscle to release factors that boost brain health

    Exercise prompts muscles to release molecular cargo that boosts brain cell function and connection, but the process is not well understood. New research from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign found that the nerves that tell muscles to move also prompt them to release more of the brain-boosting factors.

  • Carol Symes stands in Spurlock Museum with sculptures in the background

    How are states altering higher education by redefining academic freedom?

    Numerous states have enacted laws that redefine tenure and academic freedom protections at their universities. Carol Symes, a professor of history at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, discusses how these laws may fundamentally change teaching and research.

  • Photo of Dr. Lowe standing near a cattle feed lot.

    How does bird flu infect so many species?

    Dr. James Lowe, a professor of veterinary clinical medicine at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, describes the factors that influence infection with the H5N1 virus in humans and other animals.

  • Suja Thomas, the Peer and Sarah Pedersen Professor of Law at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and author of the 2016 book “The Missing American Jury: Restoring the Fundamental Constitutional Role of the Criminal, Civil, and Grand Juries.”

    What effect will Trump trials have on the perception of jury trial, civic participation?

    The Trump criminal and civil trials are likely to highlight the importance of juries and civic participation by ordinary citizens, says Suja Thomas, the Peer and Sarah Pedersen Professor of Law at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and author of the 2016 book “The Missing American Jury: Restoring the Fundamental Constitutional Role of the Criminal, Civil, and Grand Juries.”

  • Image of BFA exhibition catalog cover with hand-drawn caricatures of faces.

    Art and design seniors show their work in Krannert Art Museum exhibition

    The School of Art and Design Bachelor of Fine Arts Exhibition at Krannert Art Museum gives University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign seniors in art and design an opportunity to show work that is a culmination of their education.

  • A collage of the portraits of the five honorees.

    Five Illinois faculty elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

    Five University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign faculty members have been elected members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the oldest honorary societies in the United States. Nancy M. AmatoRashid BashirAlison BellCharles Gammie and Paul Selvin are among the 250 inductees for 2024.

  • a gif showing molecules in motion

    Electron videography captures moving dance between proteins and lipids

    In a first demonstration of “electron videography,” researchers have captured a microscopic moving picture of the delicate dance between proteins and lipids found in cell membranes. The technique can be used to study dynamics of other biomolecules, breaking free of constraints that have limited microscopy to still images of fixed molecules, say University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign researchers and collaborators at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

  • Photos of birds seen in the study. Clockwise, from top left: ring-necked pheasant, common redpoll, common nighthawk, red-bellied woodpecker and dickcissel.

    Illinois study: Backyards, urban parks support bird diversity in unique ways

    Researchers tracked bird diversity in public parks and private backyards in twin cities in Illinois with significantly different development histories and green space management practices. They found that birds rely on both public and private spaces in different seasons and for different reasons. The study linked park management practices aimed at conservation and restoration to increased bird diversity and the persistence of rarer species.

  • More organizational learning was associated with design-related product recalls than with process-related recalls, says new research co-written by Gopesh Anand, left, and Ujjal Kumar Mukherjee, both professors of business administration at Illinois.

    Paper: Firms learn more from ‘knowledge-gap’ failures than mere ‘slip-ups’

    More organizational learning was associated with design-related product recalls than with process-related recalls, says new research co-written by Gopesh Anand and Ujjal Kumar Mukherjee, both professors of business administration at Illinois.

  • Portraits of all seven professors named new fellows of the AAAS

    Seven Illinois professors elected AAAS Fellows

    Seven University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign professors have been elected 2023 Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. They are among the 502 scientists, engineers and innovators recognized for their scientifically and socially distinguished achievements by the world’s largest general scientific society. 

    The new U. of I. fellows are computer science professor Sarita Adveevolution, ecology and behavior professor Rebecca Fullercivil and environmental engineering professor Praveen Kumarchemistry professor Christy Landescommunication professor Marshall Scott Poolenatural resources and environmental sciences professor Cory Suski; and crop sciences and NRES professor Martin Williams, an ecologist in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service.  

  • Headshot of Sundiata Cha-Jua

    Why is the reparations movement gaining momentum in the U.S.?

    Support for reparations for people of African descent to compensate for slavery and racial oppression is growing because U.S. political and corporate leaders have retreated from a commitment to racial justice, says Sundiata Cha-Jua, an Illinois professor of history and of African American studies.

  • Communication professor Brian Quick and graduate students Ethan Morrow and Minhey Chung.

    Emotional radio ads may ease listeners’ qualms, boosting support for organ donation

    Radio ads that tug at listeners' heartstrings with the personal stories of transplant recipients or patients on the waiting list may overcome the qualms of many nondonor listeners, persuading them to support organ donation, says new research by scholars at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

  • Diptych image with headshots of Alison Bell and Paul Hardin Kapp.

    Two Illinois professors awarded Guggenheim Fellowships

    Two University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign professors have been awarded 2024 Guggenheim Fellowships.

  • Photo of a gallery wall with black and white manga artwork -- large vinyl prints and smaller framed prints.

    Krannert Art Museum exhibition of graduate student artwork includes manga artist’s project

    The School of Art and Design Master of Fine Arts Exhibition at Krannert Art Museum presents the artistic work of Illinois graduate students.

  • Two researchers stand in suits while a shadowed research subject performs a motor task while wearing a sensor on their hand.

    Wearable sensors for Parkinson’s can improve with machine learning, data from healthy adults

    Low-cost, wearable sensors could increase access to care for patients with Parkinson’s disease. New machine-learning approaches and a baseline of data from healthy older adults improve the accuracy of the results from such sensors, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign researchers and clinical collaborators found in a new study.

  • Tiffany Barnett White, a professor of business administration and the Bruce and Anne Strohm Faculty Fellow at the U. of I.’s Gies College of Business.

    ‘Branded access offers’ dilute parent brand via perceived lack of consumer commitment

    Consumers who highly identify with a brand take a dim view of the short-term renting of consumer goods via “branded access offers,” according to research co-written by Tiffany Barnett White, a professor of business administration at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and an expert in consumer-brand relationships.

  • Researchers

    Nothing is everything: How hidden emptiness can define the usefulness of filtration materials

    Voids, or empty spaces, exist within matter at all scales, from the astronomical to the microscopic. In a new study, researchers used high-powered microscopy and mathematical theory to unveil nanoscale voids in three dimensions. This advancement is poised to improve the performance of many materials used in the home and in the chemical, energy and medical industries — particularly in the area of filtration. 

  • Photo of Omar Pérez Figueroa in his office with a Puerto Rican flag hanging in the background.

    Research examines tweets during Hurricane María to analyze social media use during disasters

    Understanding how social media is used during a disaster can help with disaster preparedness and recovery for future events, says urban and regional planning professor Omar Pérez Figueroa.

  • Sandraluz Lara-Cinisomo

    Perinatal women of Mexican descent propose solutions to pandemic-related stressors affecting Latinos

    Perinatal women of Mexican descent living in San Diego proposed solutions to the hardships they faced obtaining food and mental health treatment during the pandemic in a study led by kinesiology and community health professor Sandraluz Lara-Cinisomo at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.