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  • Future of US citrus may hinge on consumer acceptance of genetically modified food

    A tiny insect, no bigger than the head of a pin, is threatening to topple the multibillion-dollar citrus industry in the U.S.The battle to save it is pitting producers and researchers against a formidable brown bug, the Asian citrus psyllid.

  • Exhibition of Indian paintings passed 'From Hand to Hand' at Krannert Art Museum

    Indian paintings depicting Hindu epics, royal portraits and stories of love can be seen at Krannert Art Museum’s “From Hand to Hand” exhibition, opening Feb. 28.

  • Illinois participates in new national effort to promote inclusive, diverse STEM faculty

    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is taking part in a three-year institutional program to enhance faculty recruitment, hiring and retention practices in STEM fields at public research universities. The National Science Foundation-funded Aspire: The National Alliance for Inclusive & Diverse STEM Faculty promotes inclusive teaching practices and diversity.

     

  • Are global warming, recent Midwest cold snap related?

    Last month, the Midwest experienced record-breaking cold temperatures and many are wondering how, when the climate is experiencing an unprecedented warming trend, we can still experience such frigid cold. News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian asked University of Illinois atmospheric sciences professor Don Wuebbles to explain.

  • Destination: Conservation

    I’m soaking wet from head to toe after walking through a mile of head-high dew-covered grass. Finally, I make it to my destination: an overgrown field dotted with copses of shrubs next to the Spoon River in western Illinois. I take the caps off of my binoculars. I’ve got my clipboard, a new data sheet and the stopwatch app on my phone ready to go. For the next 10 minutes, I will make a note of every bird I see or hear (mostly hear), recording its species and estimating how far away from me it is.

  • Study of Arctic fishes reveals the birth of a gene – from ‘junk’

    Though separated by a world of ocean, and unrelated to each other, two fish groups – one in the Arctic, the other in the Antarctic – share a surprising survival strategy: They both have evolved the ability to produce the same special brand of antifreeze protein in their tissues. A new study describes in molecular detail how the Arctic fishes built the gene for their antifreeze from tiny fragments of noncoding DNA, regions once considered “junk DNA."

  • What do we really know about e-cigarettes and vaping?

    E-cigarettes carry mixed messages about benefit and risk, but they’re relatively untested products with uncertain long-term health outcomes, says an Illinois professor who has studied health communication issues around vaping.

  • First film and guests announced for 21st annual ‘Ebertfest’

    A post-World War II romance is the first film announced for this year’s “Ebertfest,” coming April 10-13 to downtown Champaign and the U. of I. The film will be shown in memory of its co-star, Scott Wilson, a frequent past festival guest. Organizers also announced an added role in this year’s festival for film critic Richard Roeper.

  • New model predicts how ground shipping will affect future human health, environment

    The trucks and trains that transport goods across the United States emit gases and particles that threaten human health and the environment. A University of Illinois-led project developed a new model that predicts through 2050 the impact of different environmental policies on human mortality rates and short- and long-term climate change caused by particulate and greenhouse gas emissions.

  • Experts call for national research integrity advisory board

    It’s been proposed before, but so far no one has heeded the call for an official advisory board to support ethical behavior in research institutions. Today, leaders in academia with expertise in the professional and ethical conduct of research have formalized a proposal to finally assemble such an advisory board. The proposal appears in the journal Nature.

  • Deaths

    James W. “Jim” Chapman ... Willeta Mae Hassell Donaldson ... Elizabeth Fumiko Fujioka Easley ... Barclay George Jones ... Margaret “Eileen” Lyons ... Shirley Ann Perkins

     

     

  • Phthalates may impair fertility in female mice

    A phthalate found in many plastic and personal care products may decrease fertility in female mice, researchers at the University of Illinois found in a new study.

  • Faculty members selected for distinguished chairs

    Faculty members selected for endowed chairs deemed to be among the most distinguished honors on campus are Matthew Finkin, a professor of law; Jiawei Han, a professor of computer science; and Nancy Sottos, a professor of materials science and engineering.

  • Sonic Illinois celebration returns to Krannert Center

    Krannert Center for the Performing Arts and the School of Music at Illinois are exploring the diversity of today’s contemporary music scene during the months of February and March.

     

  • February Dance features collaborations between faculty, alumni

    Dance faculty and alumni will present new work in February Dance to celebrate the dance department's 50th anniversary.

  • University librarian recognized for achievements in library automation

    University of Illinois Librarian and Dean of Libraries John Wilkin is being honored for his innovation in library technology, including online publishing and providing access to digital content.

  • What might come of Venezuela’s political crisis?

    Illinois political scientist Damarys Canache discusses the history and politics behind the crisis of two presidents in Venezuela.

  • January in Illinois started out warm, ended with record-breaking cold

    January 2019 will be a month remembered by an unseasonably warm start, followed by a torrent of winter storms and ending with a monumental Arctic air outbreak that shattered many record-cold temperatures across the state.

    In the first 10 days of January, the statewide average temperature was 9 to 14 degrees above normal, according to Brian Kerschner, spokesperson for the Illinois State Climatologist Office, part of the Illinois State Water Survey at the U. of I. The highest temperature recorded for the month was 66 degrees, which occurred at two stations: one in Pulaski County on Jan. 2 and one in Jersey County on Jan. 8.

  • Germanic languages and literatures professor receives Humboldt Foundation research prize

    University of Illinois professor Mara Wade has been awarded an international research prize for her work on emblems and the culture of Nuremberg, Germany.

  • University Primary School 2019-20 enrollment and Community Open House

    University Primary School, the laboratory school of the College of Education at Illinois, is enrolling students in preschool to fifth grade and is holding an open house for the communityon Saturday, Feb. 16, any time between 10 a.m.-noon.

  • Deaths

    Wanda Elliott ... Norma Yvonne (Creekmur) Jackson

     

  • Illinois five-year strategic plan positions the next 150 years

    Chancellor Robert Jones and Provost Andreas Cangellaris unveiled “The Next 150,” a five-year strategic plan for the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, on Feb. 1. The full text of the plan is now online at strategicplan.illinois.edu.

  • Previous records slashed with monumental cold conditions in Illinois

    Illinois has been experiencing some of its coldest weather in decades and, in some locations, ever.

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration cooperative weather observer at Mount Carroll in northeastern Illinois reported a temperature of -38 degrees on the morning of Jan. 31.

  • Study: Gestures help students learn new words in different languages

    Students' comprehension of words in a foreign language improves if teachers pair each word with a gesture – even if the gesture is arbitrary and does not represent a word’s actual meaning, researchers at the University of Illinois found.

  • Krannert Art Museum to feature newly acquired Louise Fishman painting in spring exhibition

    Krannert Art Museum recently purchased a painting by University of Illinois alumna Louise Fishman that will be part of an exhibition of 20th century paintings at the museum.

  • Campus leaders launch new strategic plan February 1

    Chancellor Robert Jones and Provost Andreas Cangellaris are inviting campus and community members to the launch of “The Next 150,” the 2018-23 strategic plan for the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  • Microplastic contamination found in common source of groundwater, researchers report

    Microplastics contaminate the world's surface waters, yet scientists have only just begun to explore their presence in groundwater systems. A new study is the first to report microplastics in fractured limestone aquifers – a groundwater source that accounts for 25 percent of the global drinking water supply.

  • Deaths

    Edward J. Armbrust ... Paul P. Bernard ... Richard “Don” Donald Brown ... Charles “Chuck” D. Elmer ... Barbara Ann Phillips ... Marilyn G. Vizek

  • Minor selected first chief marketing officer

    Eric Minor, a University of Illinois alumnus with more than two decades of experience in corporate brand marketing, will become the university’s first-ever chief marketing officer effective Jan. 31 pending approval by the University of Illinois Board of Trustees.

     

  • What can we learn from JFK about presidential speechmaking?

    An Illinois professor looks at presidential speechmaking through one of its more-eloquent practitioners, John F. Kennedy.

  • WWII spy to speak on campus Feb. 13

    World War II French Jewish spy Marthe Cohn will speak in Krannert Center’s Great Hall at 6 p.m. Feb. 13.

  • Conservation efforts help some rare birds more than others, study finds

    Land conservation programs that have converted tens of thousands of acres of agricultural land in Illinois back to a more natural state appear to have helped some rare birds increase their populations to historic levels, a new study finds. Other bird species with wider geographic ranges have not fared as well, however.

  • Feeling groovy: Neurons integrate better with muscle grown on grooved platforms

    Growing muscle tissue on grooved platforms helps neurons more effectively integrate with the muscle, a requirement for engineering muscle in the lab that responds and functions like muscle in the body, University of Illinois researchers found in a new study.

  • 'Revealing Greater Cahokia' details research on ancient North American metropolis

    With a population between 10,000 and 30,000 in its heyday (A.D. 1050-1200) and a sprawling assortment of homes, storage buildings, temples, cemeteries, mounds and other monuments in and around what is now St. Louis and East St. Louis, Illinois, the ancient Native American city known as Greater Cahokia was the first experiment in urban living in North America.

    A new book, “Revealing Greater Cahokia, North America’s First Native City,” offers the most complete picture yet of a decade of archaeological research on a little-known part of the larger city and its precincts in East St. Louis.

  • Commission seeks input on Native imagery topics

    The Chancellor’s Commission on Native Imagery: Healing and Reconciliation is seeking input from the community to help the campus move forward on the matter of the permanently retired symbol Chief Illiniwek.

  • Expert: Justice Department reversal on online gambling 'correct decision'

    In reversing an Obama-era decision that effectively allowed internet gambling, the Department of Justice has revitalized the Interstate Wire Act of 1961, an anti-gambling statute championed by then-Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy to fight organized crime, said John W. Kindt, a professor emeritus of business administration at the University of Illinois and a leading national gambling critic.

  • School to celebrate diversity in the fields of chemical sciences and chemical engineering

    The School of Chemical Sciences at Illinois is hosting a celebration of diversity in the fields of chemical sciences and chemical engineering with two public events Feb. 5.

    The American Chemical Society will designate a national historic chemical landmark for St. Elmo Brady, the first African-American to receive a Ph.D. in chemistry in the United States, earning it in 1916 at the University of Illinois.

  • New book tells story of secret Hollywood studio that shaped the nuclear age

    Two Illinois professors tell the story of a secret Hollywood studio at the heart of the Cold War and the early nuclear age.

  • Cilia beat to an unexpected rhythm in male reproductive tract, study in mice reveals

    Waves of undulating cilia drive several processes essential to life. They clear debris and mucus from the respiratory tract, move spinal fluid through the brain and transport embryos from the ovaries to the uterus for implantation. According to a new study in mice, however, cilia perform somewhat differently in the male reproductive tract.

  • Researchers gain control over soft-molecule synthesis

    By gaining control over shape, size and composition during synthetic molecule assembly, researchers can begin to probe how these factors influence the function of soft materials. Finding these answers could help advance virology, drug delivery development and the creation of new materials. 

  • Expert: Trump’s attitude toward immigrants, migratory laborers echoes past presidents

    President Trump’s approach to undocumented immigrants and migratory laborers follows the example of past presidents who relied on racial animus to scapegoat foreigners during times of cultural change, says U. of I. labor professor Michael LeRoy.

  • Paper: Courts check presidential powers over immigration policy

    Research by Michael LeRoy, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois, indicates that presidential powers over immigration have been significantly hamstrung by the courts, with plaintiffs winning all or part of 89 percent of the rulings in cases that consider immigration orders that affect employment relationships.

  • Deaths

    Danny L. Elam ... Randall Joseph Lutz ... Glenn Gregory Simpson ... Kent Thompson

     

  • Illinois earns Climate Leadership Award

    In recognition of its innovation and leadership in climate action, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is the recipient of Second Nature’s Climate Leadership Award for four-year institutions.

  • Tap dance a highlight of spring semester at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts

    Tap at Illinois will celebrate tap dancing with a semesterlong series of tap performances at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts.

  • Researchers diversify drug development options with new metal catalyst

    A University of Illinois team of researchers led by chemistry professor M. Christina White has developed a new manganese-based catalyst that can change the structure of druglike molecules to make new drugs, advancing the pace and efficiency of drug development. 

  • Agencies to launch statewide mobile firefighting training resources

    The Illinois Fire Service Institute, part of the U. of I., will host a ceremony on Wednesday, Jan. 9 at 10 a.m. on the IFSI training grounds in Champaign. The event, held in cooperation with the Office of the Illinois State Fire Marshal, will officially release four mobile trailers containing equipment essential for firefighting skills training.

  • Deaths

    Edward E. Durbin ... Doris Patricia “Pat” Foster ... Judy Kurlakowsky ... Marjorie E. Nelson ... Frances Joann Pierce

  • Environmental greenness may not improve student test scores, study finds

    Researchers at the University of Illinois and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service suggest in a new study that environmental greenness may not be associated with higher test scores in schoolchildren after all.

  • December in Illinois: Tornadoes, warm temperatures and little snow

    With warmer-than-average temperatures, December 2018 brought slight snowfall and a historic late-season severe weather outbreak to Illinois.

    On Dec. 1, the National Weather Service confirmed 29 tornadoes in Illinois, an event that is considered the largest December tornado outbreak in state history, according to Brian Kerschner, a spokesman for the state climatologist office at the U. of I.’s Illinois State Water Survey. The second-largest number of tornadoes in December was 21  in 1957.