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  • Zukoski named next vice chancellor for research

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Charles F. Zukoski, professor and head of the chemical engineering department at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been chosen to be the next vice chancellor for research of the Urbana campus.

  • Wrinkled membranes create novel drug-delivery system

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - A University of Illinois scientist studying how membranes wrinkle has discovered a novel system for on-demand drug delivery.

  • Sheldon H. Jacobson

    Would a laptop and tablet ban enhance air travel security?

    Computer science professor Sheldon H. Jacobson discusses the proposed Department of Homeland Security ban of laptop and tablet computers in the passenger cabins of certain flights.

  • World's fastest transistor approaches goal of terahertz device

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have again broken their own speed record for the world's fastest transistor. With a frequency of 845 gigahertz, their latest device is approximately 300 gigahertz faster than transistors built by other research groups, and approaches the goal of a terahertz device.

  • With increasing obesity, fuel consumption becomes weighty matter

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Excess fuel consumption caused by excess driver and passenger weight has increased in the past two years, with no end in sight.

  • University of Illinois researcher Ben Grosser

    Will hiding 'like' counts and other numbers improve social media?

    Social media companies are experimenting with hiding metrics on their platforms – something University of Illinois art professor Ben Grosser has been exploring since 2012 with his Demetricator projects.

  • Photo of Professor Sheldon Jacobson

    Why you should factor driving into your weight loss plan

    A Minute With...™ Sheldon Jacobson, expert on data science

  • Jonathan Makela

    Why we can expect to see more activity like the recent solar flares

    A Minute With™...  Jonathan Makela, a professor of electrical and computer engineering

  • Tami Bond

    Why reducing black carbon is an essential - and relatively easy - first step in the fight against global warming

    A Minute With™... civil and environmental engineering professor Tami Bond

  • Portrait of researcher Kelly Stephani

    Why is the use of hypersonic missiles in the Russia-Ukraine conflict significant?

    The U.S. recently confirmed that the Russian Ministry of Defence fired a hypersonic ballistic missile to destroy an underground arms depot in western Ukraine. This event marks Russia’s first use of the Kinzhal ballistic missile in this war and the first known use of a hypersonic missile in combat. Mechanical science and engineering professor Kelly Stephani spoke with News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian about the significance of this technology.

  • Professor Tami Bond

    Why does atmospheric chemistry research matter?

    On Aug. 26, the National Academy of Sciences released a report on the future of atmospheric chemistry research in the U.S. Illinois civil and environmental engineering professor Tami Bond was among the contributors

  • Why did Illinois ban plastic microbeads?

    A Minute With™... B.K. Sharma and Nancy Holm, researchers at the Illinois Sustainable Technology Center

  • Why are there so many potholes this year?

    A Minute With™... Imad Al-Qadi, the director of the Illinois Center for Transportation and a professor of civil and environmental engineering

  • Professor Atul Jain

    Why are global CO2 emissions on the rise again?

    The annual Carbon Budget report found that fossil fuel emissions are on the rise again in 2017, says atmospheric sciences professor and report contributor Atul Jain

  • Photo of Professor Atul Jain

    What's in the Paris climate agreement?

    A Minute With...™ Atul Jain, expert on atmospheric carbon and climate change

  • The annual Carbon Budget report found that CO2 are projected to rise again for 2019, but at slower rate than in previous years, says atmospheric sciences professor Atul Jain.

    What’s in the global carbon budget?

    The Global Carbon Project recently released its 2019 annual report, giving decision-makers access to data on atmospheric carbon concentrations, emissions and trends. Illinois atmospheric scientist Atul Jain is among the many scientists worldwide who contributed data to the report. News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian spoke with Jain about this year’s findings.

  • Professor Sheldon Jacobson

    What should be done about long delays for security checks at airports?

    A Minute With...™ Sheldon Jacobson, expert on aviation security

  • Midwest volcanologist and geology professor Susan W. Kieffer holds a Charles R. Walgreen Jr. Chair at Illinois.

    What makes Merapi such a dangerous volcano?

     A Minute With™... Midwest volcanologist and geology professor Susan W. Kieffer

  • Photo of Ann-Perry Witmer

    What is place-based adaptation to climate change?

    A recent Washington Post-ABC News poll states that roughly half of registered voters say climate change is either “very important” or “one of the most important issues” in their vote for Congress this year. However, many citizens struggle to understand their place in this global issue. Applied Research Institute senior research scientist Ann-Perry Witmer, also a lecturer in agricultural and biological engineering, spoke with News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian about a more digestible approach to the climate crisis and encouraged readers to participate in a public panel discussion this week.

  • The annual Global Carbon Budget report found that, although fossil fuel emissions remained steady for three years ending in 2016, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide are at an all-time high and emissions are on the rise again, says atmospheric sciences professor Atul Jain.

    What is on the horizon for global carbon emissions?

    On Dec. 5, the Global Carbon Project published the Global Carbon Budget 2018, giving world leaders access to data on atmospheric carbon concentrations, emissions and trends. Illinois atmospheric scientist Atul Jain was among the many scientists worldwide who contributed data to the report. Jain talked about the carbon budget and this year’s findings with News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian.

  • Illinois physics professor Liang Yang discusses the significance of the recent neutrino detection in Antarctica and what it means for the future of observational astronomy.

    What is a neutrino and why do they matter?

    Scientists recently announced the discovery of a subatomic particle that made its way to Earth from an event that occurred 3.7 billion light-years away. Sensors buried within Antarctic ice detected the ghostly cosmic particle, called a neutrino, and traced its origin to a rapidly spinning galactic nucleus known as a blazar. Physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian spoke with physics professor Liang Yang about the significance of the discovery.

  • Atul Jain

    What is a Global Carbon Budget?

    A Minute With™... Illinois atmospheric sciences professor Atul Jain

  • Larry Di Girolamo

    What happens if the US does not replace aging weather satellites?

    A Minute With™... Larry Di Girolamo, a professor of atmospheric sciences

  • Don Wuebbles

    What does it mean that July 2012 was the hottest month on record?

    A Minute With™... atmospheric sciences professor Don Wuebbles

  • Steve Marshak

    What caused the earthquake and tsunami in Japan? Could it happen here?

    A Minute With™... Steve Marshak, a professor of geology

  • charles gamme

    What can we learn from the first close-up look at Pluto via NASA's New Horizon probe?

    A Minute With...™ Charles Gamme, a professor of astronomy and physics

  • Richard C. Berg

    What can be learned from 3-D mapping of groundwater?

    A Minute With...™ Illinois State Geological Survey director Richard Berg

  • Tony Liss

    What are the big implications of the tiny Nobel Prize-winning particle?

    A Minute With™... physics professor Tony Liss, a member of the ATLAS project at CERN

  • Weird, warm winter weather: What does it portend?

    A Minute With™... Eric Snodgrass, an atmospheric sciences instructor

  • Weight gain of U.S. drivers has increased nation's fuel consumption

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - As American waistlines have expanded since 1960, so has their consumption of gasoline, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Virginia Commonwealth University say.

  • Weather forecasts may be predictors for prevalence of West Nile virus

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Weather forecasts could become barometers for predicting the potential threat of West Nile virus to humans and wildlife, according to scientists at two state agencies based at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  • Water theory is watertight, researchers say

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - There may be tiny bubbles in the wine, but not at the interface between water and a waxy coating on glass, a new study shows.

  • Water is 'designer fluid' that helps proteins change shape, scientists say

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - According to new research, old ideas about water behavior are all wet.

  • Portrait of University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign researchers involved in this study

    Water filtration membranes morph like cells

    Morphogenesis is nature’s way of building diverse structures and functions out of a fixed set of components. While nature is rich with examples of morphogenesis – cell differentiation, embryonic development and cytoskeleton formation, for example – research into the phenomenon in synthetic materials is scant. University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign researchers are taking a step forward using electron tomography, fluid dynamics theories and machine learning to watch soft polymers as the polymers learn from nature.

  • Spherical solar cells self-assembled from flower shaped flat Si leaflets with thicknesses of 2 m: (A) Schematic illustration of steps for fabricating a spherical shaped Si solar cell; (B) Optical image of a complete device consisting of the folded spherical Si shell, inner glass bead, and printed silver electrodes; (C) Magnified view of the silver wire connected to the top contact of the spherical device; (D) Current density (J) - voltage (V) characteristics of a spherical solar cell under AM1.5 simulated sunlight irradiation, with and without a white diffuse reflector.

    Water droplets direct self-assembly process in thin-film materials

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - You can think of it as origami. - very high-tech origami.

  • Watching rocks grow: Theory explains landscape of geothermal springs

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have successfully modeled the spectacular landscapes seen at geothermal hot springs.

  • Rhanor Gillette and his colleagues built a virtual ocean predator that has simple self-awareness.

    Virtual predator is self-aware, behaves like living counterpart

    Scientists report in the journal eNeuro that they’ve built an artificially intelligent ocean predator that behaves a lot like the original flesh-and-blood organism on which it was modeled. The virtual creature, “Cyberslug,” reacts to food and responds to members of its own kind much like the actual animal, the sea slug Pleurobranchaea californica, does.

  • A vascularized fiber-reinforced composite material. Illinois researchers developed a class of sacrificial fibers that degrade after composite fabrication, leaving hollow vascular tunnels that can transport liquids or gases through the composite.

    Vascular composites enable dynamic structural materials

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Taking their cue from biological circulatory systems, University of Illinois researchers have developed vascularized structural composites, creating materials that are lightweight and strong with potential for self-healing, self-cooling, metamaterials and more.

  • Sheldon Jacobson

    Using a little science in your March Madness picks

    A Minute With...bracketology expert Sheldon Jacobson

  • Urban flooding is rising in frequency and cost. What can you do?

    A Minute With...™ Sally McConkey of the Illinois State Water Survey

  • Faranak Miraftab, a professor of urban and regional planning, is one of six Urbana professors named University Scholars for their excellence in teaching, scholarship and service.

    Urbana campus faculty members named University Scholars

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Six Urbana campus faculty members have been named University Scholars. The program recognizes excellence in teaching, scholarship and service. The faculty members will be honored at a campus reception Sept. 29 from 4:30 to 6 p.m. in the ballroom of the Alice Campbell Alumni Center, 601 S. Lincoln Ave., Urbana.

  • Uranium isotope ratios are not invariant, researchers show

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - For years, the ratio of uranium's two long-lived isotopes, U-235 and U-238, has been considered invariant, despite measurements made in the mid-1970s that hinted otherwise. Now, with improved precision from state-of-the-art instrumentation, researchers at the University of Illinois unequivocally show this ratio actually does vary significantly in Earth materials.

  • Aerial view of the U. of I. campus.

    U of I to lead two of seven new national artificial intelligence institutes

    The National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture are announcing an investment of more than $140 million to establish seven artificial intelligence institutes in the U.S. Two of the seven will be led by teams at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

    The USDA-NIFA will fund the AI Institute for Future Agricultural Resilience, Management and Sustainability at the U. of I. Illinois computer science professor Vikram Adve will lead the AIFARMS Institute.

    The NSF will fund the AI Institute for Molecular Discovery, Synthetic Strategy and Manufacturing, also known as the Molecule Maker Lab Institute. Huimin Zhao, a U. of I. professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering and of chemistry, will lead this institute.

  • U. of I. to host state finals of Science Olympiad April 29

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The state finals of the Illinois Science Olympiad will be held April 29 at the University of Illinois. The event, which begins at 8 a.m., is part of a national competition in which middle and high school students compete in 23 events involving science concepts and engineering skills. The public is invited to attend.

  • U. of I. to host state finals of Science Olympiad April 26

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The state finals of the Illinois Science Olympiad will be held April 26 at the University of Illinois. The event, which begins at 8 a.m., is part of a national competition in which middle and high school students compete in 23 events involving science concepts and engineering skills. The public is invited to attend.

  • U. of I. to host state finals of Science Olympiad April 21

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The state finals of the Illinois Science Olympiad will be held April 21 at the University of Illinois. The event, which begins at 8 a.m., is part of a national competition in which middle and high school students compete in 23 events involving science concepts and engineering skills. The public is invited to attend.

  • U. of I., Singapore establishing information technology center

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Agency for Science, Technology and Research, or A*STAR, a Singapore government agency that oversees 22 research institutes, consortia and centers, are establishing a major research center in Singapore. The Advanced Digital Sciences Center will be focused on breakthrough innovations in information technology that are expected to have a major impact in transforming human beings' utilization of information technology.

  • U. of I. signs commitment to combat climate degradation

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The University of Illinois has promised to achieve climate neutrality by joining a nationwide consortium of concerned colleges and universities that are signing the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment. By signing the commitment, Chancellor Richard Herman pledged that the U. of I. is developing a long-range plan for reducing and neutralizing greenhouse gas emissions on campus and is accelerating its research and educational efforts to equip society to re-stabilize Earth's climate and help the U.S. achieve energy independence.

  • U. of I. senior wins Gates Cambridge Scholarship

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - A senior at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is among the recipients of this year's prestigious Gates Cambridge Scholarship.

  • U. of I. scholars elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Frederick K. Lamb and Ralph G. Nuzzo, professors at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, have been elected fellows of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.