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  • Researchers use sound waves to advance optical communication

    Illinois researchers have demonstrated that sound waves can be used to produce ultraminiature optical diodes that are tiny enough to fit onto a computer chip. These devices, called optical isolators, may help solve major data capacity and system size challenges for photonic integrated circuits, the light-based equivalent of electronic circuits, which are used for computing and communications.

  • Key to willpower lies in believing you have it in abundance

    Americans believe they have less stamina for strenuous mental activity than their European counterparts -- an indication that people in the U.S. perceive their willpower or self-control as being in limited supply, suggests a new study led by a researcher at the University of Illinois.

  • U. of I. Symphony Orchestra concert to celebrate Mozart’s birthday

    The University of Illinois Symphony Orchestra will perform some of Mozart’s best-loved works and less familiar pieces in celebration of the composer’s Jan. 27 birthday.

  • Lessons in nature boost classroom engagement afterward, researchers report

    Third-graders who spend a class session in a natural outdoor setting are more engaged and less distracted in their regular classroom afterward than when they remain indoors, scientists found in a new study.

  • Nathan Gunn to make directorial debut, sing lead with Lyric Theatre at Illinois’ ‘Don Giovanni’

    Opera singer and University of Illinois School of Music alumnus Nathan Gunn will make his directorial debut at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts with Lyric Theatre at Illinois’ production of “Don Giovanni,” in addition to singing the title role.

  • Preterm babies may suffer setbacks in auditory brain development, speech

    Preterm babies born early in the third trimester of pregnancy are likely to experience delays in the development of the auditory cortex, a brain region essential to hearing and understanding sound, a new study reveals. Such delays are associated with speech and language impairments at age 2, the researchers found.

  • How massive is supermassive? Astronomers measure more black holes, farther away

    Astronomers from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey announced new measurements of the masses of a large sample of supermassive black holes far beyond our universe.

  • Only half of youths involved in problem behaviors graduate on time

    Children who experience high rates of bullying, fighting or absenteeism during seventh grade are at significantly greater risk of not graduating high school on time, a new University of Illinois study suggests.

  • Are you vulnerable to newly discovered online security risks?

    Nearly everyone is. And the culprits, Meltdown and Spectre, could wreak havoc on personal security if ignored, says computer science professor Chris Fletcher

  • Agricultural fungicide attracts honey bees, study finds

    When given the choice, honey bee foragers prefer to collect sugar syrup laced with the fungicide chlorothalonil over sugar syrup alone, researchers report in the journal Scientific Reports.

  • New book tackles challenges of strategic brand management in global markets

    A new book co-written by U. of I. business professor and branding expert Carlos J. Torelli offers a concise, flexible and modern take on global brand management.

  • Many Midwestern retailers sell mislabeled invasive vines

    Gardeners hoping to celebrate the beauty of American bittersweet – a native vine that produces orange berries in the fall and is used for wreaths – may be unwittingly buying an invasive bittersweet instead. That’s because many Midwestern retailers are selling oriental bittersweet with labels misidentifying it as the native plant, researchers report. These sales are occurring in stores and online.

  • University of Illinois librarian to help Puerto Rican libraries with disaster recovery

    Miriam Centeno, the collections care coordinator for the University of Illinois Library, will spend two weeks in January in Puerto Rico helping librarians assess and repair damage to their collections from Hurricane Maria.

  • Hormone therapy combination may benefit health without increasing cancer risk

    Treating ovariectomized mice with a combination of conjugated estrogens and the drug bazedoxifene triggers the expression of genes that improve metabolism and prevent weight gain – without stimulating the uterus and increasing risks of reproductive cancer, a new study at the University of Illinois suggests.

  • Weightless in San Luis Potosi

    OUTSIDE VALLES, MEXICO — When we first arrived at this stream, I knew we were in a special location. The clear, turquoise blue water rivals that of any picture from a Caribbean tour magazine. When I put my snorkeled face in the water, I can actually see mussels in the streambed below, something that doesn’t happen very often in Illinois streams. Collecting the mussels, however, is proving difficult.

  • What does the tax reform bill mean for the middle class?

    The current tax bill fits with a 30-year trend that doesn’t favor income from work, says sociologist Kevin Leicht

  • Whole eggs better for muscle building and repair than egg whites, researchers find

    People who consume 18 grams of protein from whole eggs or from egg whites after engaging in resistance exercise differ dramatically in how their muscles build protein, a process called protein synthesis, during the post-workout period, researchers report in a new study. Specifically, the post-workout muscle-building response in those eating whole eggs is 40 percent greater than in those consuming an equivalent amount of protein from egg whites, the team found.

  • Basar named College of Engineering interim dean

    Tamer Basar has been named the interim dean of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's College of Engineering effective Jan. 16, subject to approval of the University of Illinois Board of Trustees.

  • Heat from below Pacific Ocean fuels Yellowstone, study finds

    Recent stories in the national media are magnifying fears of a catastrophic eruption of the Yellowstone volcanic area, but scientists remain uncertain about the likelihood of such an event. To better understand the region’s subsurface geology, University of Illinois geologists have rewound and played back a portion of its geologic history, finding that Yellowstone volcanism is more far more complex and dynamic than previously thought. 

  • Six Illinois faculty members awarded NEH Fellowships

    Six University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign faculty members have been awarded National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships for 2018. It is the third year in the last four that the Urbana campus has garnered more fellowship awards than any other single institution.

  • High-resolution climate models present alarming new projections for U.S.

    Approaching the second half of the century, the United States is likely to experience increases in the number of days with extreme heat, the frequency and duration of heat waves, and the length of the growing season. In response, it is anticipated that societal, agricultural and ecological needs will increase the demand on already-strained natural resources like water and energy. University of Illinois researchers have developed new, high-resolution climate models that may help policymakers mitigate these effects at a local level.

  • U. of I. students propose designs to rehab Chicago industrial area

    University of Illinois students developed ideas to revitalize an industrial area in Chicago, as part of an interdisciplinary collaboration involving graduate students in architecture, landscape architecture and urban and regional planning.

  • What keeps women from reporting sexual harassment?

    Women often don’t report sexual harassment because grievance procedures frequently take on the feel of litigation, an Illinois professor says.

  • Does revoking professional licenses prompt borrowers to repay student loans?

    Even though several states have these regulations on the books, they’re really a last resort for collecting student loan debt, says Professor Angela Lyons

  • Library adds 14 millionth book, will create display recognizing millionth volumes

    The University of Illinois Library has added its 14 millionth volume to its collection -- “The University of Illinois: Engine of Innovation” by Frederick E. Hoxie, a professor emeritus of history and American Indian studies, written to commemorate the U. of I.’s sesquicentennial. The Library will create a new, permanent display to recognize all its millionth volumes.

     

  • Museum curator, art historian named Krannert Art Museum director

    Jon Seydl, an art historian and currently the senior director of collections and programs and curator of European art at the Worcester Art Museum in Massachusetts, has been named the new director of Krannert Art Museum at the University of Illinois.

  • Molecular beacon signals low oxygen with ultrasound

    Researchers have developed a way to find hypoxia, or low oxygen in tissue, noninvasively in real time with light and ultrasound.

  • Who wins and loses in proposed tax reform?

    Richard Kaplan, an internationally recognized expert on U.S. tax policy, discusses the Republican tax overhaul plan now before Congress

  • Study: Viruses share genes with organisms across the tree of life

    A new study finds that viruses share some genes exclusively with organisms that are not their hosts. The study, reported in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology, adds to the evidence that viruses are agents of diversity, researchers say.

  • Exercise changes gut microbial composition independent of diet, team reports

    Two studies – one in mice and the other in human subjects – offer the first definitive evidence that exercise alone can change the composition of microbes in the gut. The studies were designed to isolate exercise-induced changes from other factors – such as diet or antibiotic use – that might alter the intestinal microbiota.

  • New book explores housewives, food and consumer protests in 20th-century America

    The rising cost of meat and the power of housewives to agitate for a more equitable standard of living is the focus of a new book by U. of I. labor and employment relations professor Emily E. LB. Twarog.

  • Krannert Art Museum wins prestigious award, adds 16th-century print to its collection

    Krannert Art Museum has added a 16th-century print by Albrecht Durer – one of the world’s most skilled engravers – to its collection. The museum was awarded the 2017 Richard Hamilton Acquisition Prize, given by the International Fine Print Dealers Association, which provided funds for the purchase.

  • Conspiracy thinking less likely with greater news media literacy, study suggests

    Those who are more news media literate are less likely to believe conspiracy theories, even ones that resonate with their politics, a study suggests.

  • Study: Stereotypes about race and responsibility persist in bankruptcy system

    Bankruptcy attorneys have little knowledge of the racial disparities that exist within the bankruptcy system, relying instead on common stereotypes about race, responsibility and debt, according to research co-written by Robert M. Lawless, the Max L. Rowe Professor of Law at Illinois and a leading consumer credit and bankruptcy expert.

  • Does tax reform bill spell trouble for higher education?

    Higher education finance expert Jennifer Delaney talks about the possible ramifications for college students and their families of tax reform proposals being considered by the U.S. Senate 

  • Choreographer wrestles with notions of masculinity in new dance-theater work

    The latest work by dancer-choreographer Cynthia Oliver looks for an expansive view of black masculinity. “Virago-Man Dem” considers male behaviors within Caribbean and African-American cultures, and how black men find themselves restricted by societal codes and taboos.

  • Drug-delivering nanoparticles seek and destroy elusive cancer stem cells

    Researchers are sending tiny drug-laden nanoparticles on a mission to seek and destroy cancer stem cells.

  • Krannert Art Museum to screen short films on World AIDS Day

    Krannert Art Museum will show seven short films about the impact of the AIDS crisis in black communities as part of Day With(out) Art. It is the first year the museum is hosting the film program in recognition of World AIDS Day on Dec. 1.

  • What role do judges play in employment harassment cases?

    Judges can unilaterally dismiss sexual or racial harassment cases through summary judgment, a legal maneuver that ends up favoring employers over employees, says Law professor Suja Thomas

  • Cancer drug starts clinical trials in human brain-cancer patients

    A drug that spurs cancer cells to self-destruct has been cleared for use in a clinical trial of patients with anaplastic astrocytoma, a rare malignant brain tumor, and glioblastoma multiforme, an aggressive late-stage cancer of the brain. This phase Ib trial will determine if the experimental drug PAC-1 can be used safely in combination with a standard brain-cancer chemotherapy drug, temozolomide.

  • Why are global CO2 emissions on the rise again?

    The annual Carbon Budget report found that fossil fuel emissions are on the rise again in 2017, says atmospheric sciences professor and report contributor Atul Jain

  • Titan the survivor

    The first time I see Titan, a pit bull with mesothelioma in his chest, I give his owners “the talk.” The dog is breathing hard and fast because of the buildup of cancerous fluid around his lungs. Dogs develop some cancers that are very similar to human cancers. This is one that we don’t see very often and for which we don’t have really good treatment options, just like in humans. We eventually learn, however, that Titan is unique.

  • Two Illinois faculty members elected AAAS Fellows

    Two faculty members at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been elected 2017 Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Fellows are chosen for their outstanding contributions to their field of study.

  • Theory: Flexibility is at the heart of human intelligence

    Centuries of study have yielded many theories about how the brain gives rise to human intelligence. A new theory makes the case that the brain’s dynamic properties – how it is wired but also how that wiring shifts in response to changing intellectual demands – are the best predictors of intelligence in the human brain.

  • Carefully crafted light pulses control neuron activity

    Specially tailored, ultrafast pulses of light can trigger neurons to fire and could one day help patients with light-sensitive circadian or mood problems, according to a new study in mice at the University of Illinois.

  • Five Illinois researchers rank among world’s most influential

    Five faculty members have been named to the 2017 Clarivate Analytics Highly Cited Researchers list (previously known as the Thomson Reuters Highly Cited Researchers list). The list recognizes “leading researchers in the sciences and social sciences from around the world."

  • Genomic study explores evolution of gentle ‘killer bees’ in Puerto Rico

    A genomic study of Puerto Rico’s Africanized honey bees – which are more docile than other so-called “killer bees” – reveals that they retain most of the genetic traits of their African honey bee ancestors, but that a few regions of their DNA have become more like those of European honey bees. According to the researchers, these changes likely contributed to the bees’ rapid evolution toward gentleness in Puerto Rico, a change that occurred within 30 years.

  • Study in mice finds dietary levels of genistein may adversely affect female fertility

    Exposure to the phytoestrogen genistein prior to conception may adversely affect female fertility and pregnancy outcomes, depending on the dosage and duration of exposure, a new study in mice by scientists at the University of Illinois suggests.

  • Shape-shifting agent targets harmful bacteria in the stomach

    A new shape-shifting polymer can target and kill Helicobacter pylori bacteria in the stomach without killing helpful bacteria in the gut.

  • Paper: ‘No money down’ bankruptcies prevalent among the poor, minorities

    Bankruptcy attorneys are increasingly encouraging clients to file for the more expensive “no money down” option of Chapter 13 bankruptcy – a tactic that’s used more often with blacks than with whites, according to research co-written by Robert M. Lawless, the Max L. Rowe Professor of Law at Illinois and a leading consumer credit and bankruptcy expert.