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  • Planning processes for Chicago's 606 Trail spawned gentrification, study finds

    A new study examines the planning processes associated with Chicago's 606 Trail and concludes that delegating management of the project to a nonprofit may have made gentrification the most likely outcome.

  • Illinois, French partners digitizing Proust's letters

    Illinois researchers and their French partners have created a website to make thousands of letters written by Marcel Proust available to the public.

  • Deaths

    William Curtis Blaylock ... Susan Blunier ... Paula Jo Goodwin ... Barbara Clarke Swain

  • Illinois presidents: What made them agents of change?

    With the “Land of Lincoln” celebrating its bicentennial, a historian looks at the influence of four Illinois-connected presidents.

  • Oates receives digital preservation award

    Alumna Anna Oates won the National Records of Scotland Award for the Most Outstanding Student Work in Digital Preservation for her master’s thesis work on the PDF/A standard. She received the award Nov. 29 at a ceremony at the Amsterdam Museum as part of an international conference hosted by the Dutch Digital Heritage Network and the Amsterdam Museum on World Digital Preservation Day. Anna Oates received her master's degree in 2018 from the School of Information Sciences.

  • November was cold and snowy in Illinois

    The statewide average temperature for November in Illinois was 35.3 degrees, which is 7.2 degrees below normal, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel of the Illinois State Water Survey at the U. of I. November 2018 was ranked the eighth-coldest November on record.

  • What is on the horizon for global carbon emissions?

    On Dec. 5, the Global Carbon Project published the Global Carbon Budget 2018, giving world leaders access to data on atmospheric carbon concentrations, emissions and trends. Illinois atmospheric scientist Atul Jain was among the many scientists worldwide who contributed data to the report. Jain talked about the carbon budget and this year’s findings with News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian.

  • Team converts wet biological waste to diesel-compatible fuel

    In a step toward producing renewable engine fuels that are compatible with existing diesel fuel infrastructure, researchers report they can convert wet biowaste, such as swine manure and food scraps, into a fuel that can be blended with diesel and that shares diesel’s combustion efficiency and emissions profile.

    They report their findings in the journal Nature Sustainability.

  • English professor's first book tells stories of contemporary lives of black Americans

    Illinois author Nafissa Thompson-Spires has received national recognition for her first book, “Heads of the Colored People,” which uses humor and satire to tell the stories of black Americans.

  • Boys with social difficulties most susceptible to early substance use, study finds

    Boys who enter sixth-grade with co-occurring social skills, anxiety, learning and conduct problems are at the greatest risk of developing aggressive behavior and using substances by the end of eighth grade, a new study found.

  • Book by Illinois music professor looks at how Brazilian forro music, environment are connected

    Illinois ethnomusicologist Michael Silvers writes in his new book about forro music of Brazil and its connections to the environment, drought and politics.

  • Can we talk about the Illinois climate?

    Jim Angel, the Illinois state climatologist, has announced that he will retire in December 2018 after 34 years at the Illinois State Water Survey. News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian spoke with him about his career, climate change and the National Climate Assessment released on Black Friday.

  • Deaths

    Alva “Tad” LeRoy Addy ... Nancy J. Blackburn ... Belle Anna Brine ... John Roy Campbell ... Judith “Judy” Arlene Corray ... Terry Denny ... Marjorie Ellen (Keagle) Lange ... Alleta A. (Sue) Moore ... John (Jim) J.E. Mullen ... George Robert Young

  • Finding darters where no one thought to look

    “Pull off in about a mile and a half,” I tell my colleague Josh Sherwood, an ichthyologist with the Illinois Natural History Survey. A minute goes by before he flips on the amber light bar over our heads and pulls the truck into the grass alongside the Jane Addams Memorial Tollway, about 60 miles west of Chicago. The ground is littered with trash, broken glass and bits of tire – like any major highway. A few feet away is a small, unnamed stream, barely more than 2 feet wide and less than 6 inches deep.

    “Why would anyone want to sample this site?” I ask myself.

  • Nine Illinois researchers rank among world’s most influential

    Nine faculty members at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been named to the 2018 Clarivate Analytics Highly Cited Researchers list.

  • Adoption of mobile payment shifts consumer spending patterns, habits

    Paying for goods with a smartphone not only increases the overall transaction amount and frequency of purchases by consumers, it also effectively replaces the actual, physical credit cards in their wallets, said Yuqian Xu, a professor of business administration at the Gies College of Business at Illinois.

  • Chancellor’s Commission on Native Imagery: Healing and Reconciliation begins work

    The Chancellor’s Commission on Native Imagery: Healing and Reconciliation begins its work today.

  • North American checklist identifies the fungus among us

    Some fungi are smelly and coated in mucus. Others have gills that glow in the dark. Some are delicious; others, poisonous. Some spur euphoria when ingested. Some produce antibiotics.

    All of these fungi - and hundreds of thousands, if not millions, more - occur in North America. Of those that are known to science, 44,488 appear in a new checklist of North American fungi, published this month in the journal Mycologia.

  • Krannert Art Museum to offer short films, panel discussion for World AIDS Day

    Krannert Art Museum will screen short films about AIDS activism – the only downstate Illinois venue to show the films – for World AIDS Day on Dec. 1.

  • Four Illinois faculty members elected AAAS Fellows

    Four professors at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been elected 2018 Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. They are: mechanical science and engineering professor Narayana Aluru, computer science professor William Gropp and plant biology professors Andrew Leakey and Ray Ming.

  • Grant will fund child care, support for undergraduates with children

    Low-income undergraduate students at the U. of I. who need assistance juggling the demands of parenthood and college will be able to get assistance through programs and services offered by the Child Development Laboratory.

  • Effort clarifies major branch of insect tree of life

    The insects known as Hemiptera are not a particularly glamorous bunch. This group includes stink bugs, bed bugs, litter bugs, scale insects and aphids. Their closest relatives are thrips, bark lice and parasitic lice. But with a massive number of species, two-thirds of which are still unknown to science, these insects together make up one of the twiggiest branches on the tree of life.

    A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences collected a vast amount of molecular data on these insects and used the information to help tease out their family relationships and evolutionary history.

  • Scientists study puncture performance of cactus spines

    Researchers discovered that the same biomechanical traits that allow the barbed spines of the jumping cholla and other cacti to readily penetrate animal flesh also make the spines more difficult to dislodge.

  • Soil temperatures continue November decline

    Soil temperatures have fallen significantly throughout the state in November, according to Jennie Atkins, the Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring Program manager at the Illinois State Water Survey at the U. of I.

  • Ostoja-Starzewski awarded Worcester Reed Warner Medal for engineering literature

    Martin Ostoja-Starzewski, a professor of mechanical science and engineering at Illinois and a member of the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology Computational Imaging Group, was awarded the 2018 Worcester Reed Warner Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers during a ceremony at ASME’s International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition in Pittsburgh.

  • Department of special education receives leadership award

    The Winston Knolls Education Group has awarded the department of special education at the College of Education at Illinois the 2019 Margaret Bancroft Distinguished Leadership Award. The award celebrates recipients’ accomplishments, professional achievements and public and civic service.

  • Saying goodbye to an old measure

    I'm video recording on three DSLR cameras today, which is the most I can handle by myself. But I don't want to miss a second of this event, because I flew to Paris the day before yesterday just to film this auditorium of international delegates. These serious-looking men and women are actually very excited. I know that because several of them have told me so. In a few minutes, they will cast their nation's vote on whether to accept the proposed redefinition of the kilogram.

  • Youth dating violence shaped by parents’ conflict-handling views, study finds

    Parents who talk to their children about nonviolent conflict resolution reduce children’s likelihood of abusing their dating partners – even if parents give contradictory messages advocating violence in some situations.

  • Deaths

    James B. Sinclair

     

  • Checks and balances, presidential power the topics of Nov. 29 Cline Symposium

    Constitutional checks and balances and the power of the presidency will be topics of a speech and roundtable Nov. 29 at the U. of I.

  • Diagnostic tool helps engineers to design better global infrastructure solutions

    Designing safe bridges and water systems for low-income communities is not always easy for engineers coming from highly industrialized places. A new discipline called contextual engineering helps engineers think beyond personal values, expectations and definitions of project success when tackling global infrastructure problems.

  • Wuebbles honored by American Geophysical Union

    Donald J. Wuebbles, the Harry E. Preble Endowed Professor of Atmospheric Sciences at Illinois, has been selected as the 2018 Bert Bolin awardee and lecturer of the American Geophysical Union’s Environmental Change section.

  • Excavating a cave without leaving campus

    I’m in a cave with three identical waterfalls. The roar of water fills my ears as I look around, a little shakily. This is not what I was expecting when I showed up to Davenport Hall for an interview. But when I said, “Yes, I’d love to try out a virtual reality environment,” two students perched a headset on my head, adjusted the earphones and set me loose in this “cave.”

    I can hear anthropology professor Laura Shackelford gently guiding me. I’m aware that I’m in a room with her and the students, but I’m also in a cave, alone.

  • Historian tells new story about England’s venerated ‘Domesday Book’

    An Illinois historian tells a new story about England’s famous “Domesday Book” and what it tells us about the trauma of the Norman conquest.

  • Native American dance exhibition comes to Spurlock Museum

    A Native American dance exhibition is scheduled for Friday, Nov. 16 at 4 p.m. at Spurlock Museum of World Cultures at Illinois. Sponsored by the Native American House and Spurlock Museum, the free event features interactive Native American dances highlighting the Men’s Traditional and Woodlands styles.

  • For community college students, ‘nudge-induced borrowing’ increases achievement

    When student loan amounts were printed in community college financial aid award letters, it led to better academic results and, in the following year, an increase in transfers to four-year colleges, says new research from Ben Marx, a professor of economics at Illinois.

  • Paper: Fostering gratitude reduces materialism, increases generosity in adolescents

    Reflecting on what one is grateful for not only tends to lower materialism, but also increases one’s generosity, says new research co-written by Gies College of Business professor Aric Rindfleisch.

  • Illinois Fire Service Institute to hold training for U.S. Armed Forces veterans

    On Nov. 10, the Illinois Fire Service Institute will host the inaugural “Veterans in the Fire Service Day: An Opportunity for Firefighters Past, Present, and Future.” It is a professional development opportunity for U.S. Armed Forces veterans who also have served, are serving or may be interested in serving as firefighters.

  • University Library event to honor veterans

    A University Library event and exhibit will recognize the services of veterans of the armed forces.

  • ‘Virago-Man Dem’ to be performed Nov. 15 at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts

    The Krannert Center for the Performing Arts will present “Virago-Man Dem” by choreographer Cynthia Oliver Thursday, Nov. 15 at 7:30 p.m. at the Colwell Playhouse.

     

  • Deaths

    Stephen Mitchell ... Patsy R. Paye ... Alan Rankin ... Stanley James Rankin ... Arthur J. Slates ... Edward L. Young

  • E-cigarette use rising dramatically among Illinois teens, survey finds

    The use of electronic cigarettes has increased by 65 percent among sophomores and by 45 percent among seniors in Illinois high schools over the past two years, according to this year's Illinois Youth Survey.

  • November Dance celebrates dance department’s first 50 years with work by faculty, alumni

    November Dance will celebrate the University of Illinois dance department’s 50th anniversary with collaborations between faculty members and alumni.

  • Communities with less variety in housing types have higher foreclosure rates, say Illinois researchers

    Illinois researchers find that less variety in housing types leads to less stability and higher rates of foreclosures.

  • Study: At-risk mothers receive less support, information on breastfeeding

    Single mothers, those with less education and mothers enrolled in the WIC Program may receive less information and support with breastfeeding, University of Illinois researchers found in a new study.

  • Bone-chilling weather changes for Illinois residents in October

    Illinois’ weather in October was a mixed bag of conditions with temperatures in the 90s, the first fall frost, the first snow of the season and widespread heavy rains, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel at the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

  • Irish artists Kennedy Browne grapple with ‘Real World Harm’ at Krannert Art Museum

    The first solo U.S. exhibition by Irish artists Kennedy Browne at Krannert Art Museum raises questions about global commerce and technology.

  • Caterpillar, fungus in cahoots to threaten fruit, nut crops, study finds

    New research reveals that Aspergillus flavus, a fungus that produces carcinogenic aflatoxins that can contaminate seeds and nuts, has a multilegged partner in crime: the navel orangeworm caterpillar, which targets some of the same nut and fruit orchards afflicted by the fungus. Scientists report in the Journal of Chemical Ecology that the two pests work in concert to overcome plant defenses and resist pesticides.

  • Study: Culture strongly influences coping behaviors after natural disasters

    Demographic and cultural differences strongly influence young people's coping styles after a natural disaster, and these disparities should be taken into account when providing services to help them recover, a new study found.

  • EU ambassador to speak Nov. 9 as part of EU Day at Illinois

    The EU’s ambassador to the U.S. will discuss the U.K. Brexit process and transatlantic relations as part of EU Day on Nov. 9.