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  • Debra Flessner

    Flessner named Office Professional of the Year 2024

    Debra Flessner was selected as the 2024 Office Professional of the Year by the Illinois Administrative Professionals at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. The office administrator for System Offices Shared Services, Flessner is the 32nd recipient of the annual award. 

  • Stefan Vogler standing in front of a Pride flag

    How are LGBTQ people treated by law enforcement?

    Sociology professor Stefan Vogler at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign is a co-author of a new American Civil Liberties Union research report, “Policing Progress: Findings from a National Survey of LGBTQ+ People’s Experiences with Law Enforcement.”

  • Illinois student awarded Boren funding for overseas language study

    Di Lan Johnson, a junior in global studies, was awarded the Boren scholarship and plans to study in Taiwan for the 2024-2025 academic year.

  • Illinois Commencement Speaker Jeanne Gang: Keep the Spark

    Jeanne Gang, an internationally renowned architect, graduated from the university in 1986 with a degree in architecture. Here's the transcript of her 2024 Commencement speech.

  • Researchers

    Three Illinois faculty members elected to National Academy of Sciences

    Three University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign professors have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, one of a scientist's highest professional honors. Physics professor Chen-Yu Liubiochemistry professor emeritus Steve Sligar and chemistry professor emeritus Ken Suslick are among 120 newly elected U.S. members and 24 international members in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.

  • Carol Symes stands in Spurlock Museum with sculptures in the background

    How are states altering higher education by redefining academic freedom?

    Numerous states have enacted laws that redefine tenure and academic freedom protections at their universities. Carol Symes, a professor of history at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, discusses how these laws may fundamentally change teaching and research.

  • Photo of Dr. Lowe standing near a cattle feed lot.

    How does bird flu infect so many species?

    Dr. James Lowe, a professor of veterinary clinical medicine at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, describes the factors that influence infection with the H5N1 virus in humans and other animals.

  • Suja Thomas, the Peer and Sarah Pedersen Professor of Law at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and author of the 2016 book “The Missing American Jury: Restoring the Fundamental Constitutional Role of the Criminal, Civil, and Grand Juries.”

    What effect will Trump trials have on the perception of jury trial, civic participation?

    The Trump criminal and civil trials are likely to highlight the importance of juries and civic participation by ordinary citizens, says Suja Thomas, the Peer and Sarah Pedersen Professor of Law at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and author of the 2016 book “The Missing American Jury: Restoring the Fundamental Constitutional Role of the Criminal, Civil, and Grand Juries.”

  • Illinois Named a Top Peace Corps Volunteer Producer

    Since the Peace Corps was established in 1961, more than 1,600 U. of I. alumni have served as volunteers, placing Illinois at No. 7 among the agency’s all-time top volunteer producing large colleges and universities.

  • A collage of the portraits of the five honorees.

    Five Illinois faculty elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

    Five University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign faculty members have been elected members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the oldest honorary societies in the United States. Nancy M. AmatoRashid BashirAlison BellCharles Gammie and Paul Selvin are among the 250 inductees for 2024.

  • Portraits of all seven professors named new fellows of the AAAS

    Seven Illinois professors elected AAAS Fellows

    Seven University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign professors have been elected 2023 Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. They are among the 502 scientists, engineers and innovators recognized for their scientifically and socially distinguished achievements by the world’s largest general scientific society. 

    The new U. of I. fellows are computer science professor Sarita Adveevolution, ecology and behavior professor Rebecca Fullercivil and environmental engineering professor Praveen Kumarchemistry professor Christy Landescommunication professor Marshall Scott Poolenatural resources and environmental sciences professor Cory Suski; and crop sciences and NRES professor Martin Williams, an ecologist in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service.  

  • Headshot of Sundiata Cha-Jua

    Why is the reparations movement gaining momentum in the U.S.?

    Support for reparations for people of African descent to compensate for slavery and racial oppression is growing because U.S. political and corporate leaders have retreated from a commitment to racial justice, says Sundiata Cha-Jua, an Illinois professor of history and of African American studies.

  • Sixteen employees honored with Chancellor's Staff Excellence Award

    Sixteen academic professionals and civil service staff members have received the 2024 Chancellor’s Staff Excellence Award. Employees with at least three years of service are eligible for nomination in one of eight functional categories.

  • Four Illinois students receive Critical Language Scholarships

    Four University of Illinois students received U.S. Department of State Critical Language Scholarships to study foreign languages this summer.

  • Campus Awards Honor Excellence in Instruction

    The Campus Awards for Excellence in Instruction are awarded for excellence in teaching, mentoring and advising.

  • Diptych image with headshots of Alison Bell and Paul Hardin Kapp.

    Two Illinois professors awarded Guggenheim Fellowships

    Two University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign professors have been awarded 2024 Guggenheim Fellowships.

  • Illini Success report spotlights postgraduation outcomes, rising starting salaries for recent Illinois graduates

    Recent graduates from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign landed postgraduation opportunities at high rates and with increased starting salaries, according to data compiled from the annual Illini Success report.

  • Five Illinois students honored with Goldwater scholarships

    University of Illinois students Syliva E, Amelia Korveziroska, Daniel Feng, Alice Gao and Riley Trendler were awarded Barry M. Goldwater scholarships for their potential to contribute to the advancement of research in the natural sciences, mathematics or engineering.

  • Headshot of Hermann von Hesse with museum exhibit in background.

    Illinois art history scholar awarded 2024 ACLS Fellowship

    Illinois art history professor Hermann von Hesse has been awarded a 2024 American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship.

  • Carl Bernacchi stands in front of a large image of a solar eclipse.

    What can researchers learn about ecosystems and the environment during the total solar eclipse?

    Scientists across the U.S. and Mexico are engaging in a one-day data-gathering operation to record how the 2024 total solar eclipse affects various aspects of life on Earth. At the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, crop sciences and plant biology professor Carl Bernacchi and his colleagues will focus on atmospheric and ecosystem-scale responses to the eclipse. Bernacchi describes what is planned and how it fits into the bigger research effort.

  • Photo of LaKisha David in a stairwell

    Can genetic genealogy restore family narratives disrupted by the transatlantic slave trade?

    Some political figures seek to remove references to slavery from the study of American history, adding to the vast knowledge gaps that stem from the transatlantic slave trade. To better understand these histories, scholars and individuals are turning to genetic genealogy to discover and retrace descendant-family lineages. In a recent paper published in the journal American Anthropologist, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign anthropology professor LaKisha David described these efforts. She spoke about the work to News Bureau life sciences editor Diana Yates. 

  • Cynthia Buckley standing in her office with a bookcase full of books behind her

    How is the Russia-Ukraine war affecting non-allied countries’ interest in joining NATO?

    Diminshed humanitarian and miliary assistance for Ukraine has severe implications and is critical to U.S. national security and its influence within NATO and around the globe, says University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign sociology professor and demographer Cynthia Buckley.

  • Professor Leslie Looney

    Expert advises eclipse watchers to get the best vantage point – are you ready?

    Leslie Looney is an astronomy professor at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and director of the Laboratory for Astronomical Imaging. He spoke with News Bureau physical sciences and media editor Lois Yoksoulian about the significance of solar eclipses and what to expect on April 8.

  • Brian Gaines, a professor of political science at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and the Honorable W. Russell Arrington Professor in State Politics at the U of I System’s Institute of Government and Public Affairs.

    How should voters feel about polls heading into the presidential election?

    How should voters feel about polls heading into the presidential election? With the small number of swing states in play, national polls will be of limited value, says University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign political science professor Brian Gaines.

  • August, December 2023 graduates and Dean’s List honorees announced

    The University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign announced Dean’s List honorees and graduates for the fall semester 2023, and the graduates for August 2023.
     

  • Researcher Michelle Nelson portrait

    How will generative artificial intelligence affect political advertising in 2024?

    It’s estimated that $12 billion will be spent on political ads this election cycle – 30% more than in 2020. The sheer volume of ads is remarkable, and there is vast potential to use this political information to contribute to democracy: to reach more potential voters and provide accurate information. There's also more potential than ever for generative artificial intelligence to misrepresent candidates and policies, leading to confusion in the voting booth. News Bureau editor Lois Yoksoulian spoke with advertising professor and department head Michelle Nelson about the topic.

  • Headshot of Richard Tempest

    What does the death of Russian dissident Aleksei Navalny mean for the future of opposition movements in Russia?

    Russian dissident Aleksei Navalny possessed a unique ability to unite activists and set the agenda for the anti-Putin movement. Now that he’s gone, the coalition he built might splinter, says Richard Tempest, a professor of Slavic languages and literatures at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

  • What's the importance of state scientists?

    State scientists are a critical part of research efforts at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign – as well as helping to inform state policy, working with industry and educating the public on issues of scientific importance. Praveen Kumar, the executive director of the Prairie Research Institute, discusses the importance of Illinois state scientists and the roles they play as experts for the state with News Bureau staff writer Maeve Reilly.

  • Illinois among top producers of Fulbright US Student awards

    The University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign is one of the top university and college producers of Fulbright student grant recipients in the U.S., according to the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, which announced the 2023-24 awards.

  • Nicholas Grossman

    Where do we stand at the two-year mark of the Russian invasion of Ukraine?

    With the prospects of a more sympathetic U.S. president taking office in 2025, Russian President Vladimir Putin almost certainly won’t seek an off-ramp this year from the war in Ukraine, says University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign political science professor and international relations expert Nicholas Grossman.

  • Portrait of Cynthia Oliver wearing a black turtleneck and a colorful headwrap, standing in a hallway with cinder block walls.

    New Illinois initiative to embed arts into all aspects of university

    University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign dance professor Cynthia Oliver is leading the chancellor’s arts integration initiative for campus.

  • A side-by-side image of two fellowship recipients

    Two Illinois faculty members elected to National Academy of Engineering

    Two University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign faculty members from The Grainger College of Engineering have been elected to the National Academy of Engineering. The new members are Kiruba Haran, a professor of electrical and computer engineering and the Grainger Endowed Director’s Chair in Electric Machinery and Electromechanics, and Taher Saif, the Edward William and Jane Marr Gutgsell Professor in mechanical science and engineering.


  • Diptych image with headshot of Kira Dominguez Hultgren and a weaving titled "Arose."

    Illinois art professor receives United States Artists Fellowship

    Artist, weaver and University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign art professor Kira Dominguez Hultgren has been awarded a 2024 United States Artists Fellowship.

  • University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign political science professor Damarys Canache

    What should US policy be toward Venezuela?

    The Biden administration’s approach to Venezuela has been influenced by the increasing number of Venezuelan migrants coming to the U.S. and the current instability in the Middle East affecting the crude oil market, says University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign political science professor Damarys Canache.

  • Portrait of Catherine Dana in the laboratory. She is standing behind a display of cicada specimens in a specimen drawer. Her colleague, who is closer to the camera, is using a magnifying glass to magnify a few of the cicada specimens in the drawer.

    Will 2024 be the year of the cicada in Illinois?

    According to cicada expert Catherine Dana, 2024 will be an eventful year in Illinois with the emergence of two periodical cicada broods across most parts of the state.

  • U. of I. names new endowed chairs, professorships

    Faculty members selected for endowed chairs and professorships in recognition of their excellence and prominence in research, teaching and service, are Christopher Freeburg, a professor of English; D. Fairchild Ruggles, a professor of landscape architecture; Charles Gammie, a professor of astronomy and physics; James Imlay, a professor of microbiology; Klara Nahrstedt, a professor of computer science; Chrystalla Mouza, a professor and dean of the College of Education; Andrew Leakey, a professor of plant biology; Cynthia Oliver, a professor of dance and Brent Roberts, a professor of psychology.

  • Diptych image with headshots of Hermann von Hesse and Julie Turnock

    Two Illinois professors awarded NEH Fellowships

    University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign professors Julie Turnock and Hermann von Hesse have been awarded 2023 National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships.

  • Lena Shapiro, a clinical assistant professor of law and the inaugural director of the College of Law’s First Amendment Clinic

    What are the legal, practical bounds of free speech on college campuses?

    One of the problems with “speech codes” on university campuses is their selective enforcement. Consequently, there have been calls for the reform of speech and harassment policies at universities nationwide to balance students’ right to freedom of expression with the right to learn free from discriminatory harassment, says Lena Shapiro, a clinical assistant professor of law and the inaugural director of the College of Law’s First Amendment Clinic.

  • Atul Jain

    Why are global carbon emissions starting to increase again?

    On Dec. 5, the Global Carbon Project published the Global Carbon Budget 2023, giving world leaders access to data on atmospheric carbon concentrations, emissions and trends. University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign atmospheric scientist Atul Jain is among the many scientists worldwide who contributed data to the report. Jain talked about the current state of the carbon budget and this year’s findings with News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian.

  • Photo of Michael LeRoy, an expert in labor law and labor relations at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

    Would court ruling mean college athletes are employees?

    A ruling in favor of college athletes in Johnson v. NCAA could potentially herald the most consequential change in college athletics since the NCAA was formed in 1906, says Michael LeRoy, an expert in labor law at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

  • Photo of Robert Brunner, the associate dean for innovation and chief disruption officer at the Gies College of Business at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, where he helped spearhead efforts to create iBlock, the first blockchain created by a business school.

    What impact will the Biden administration’s executive order have on AI development?

    The best way to think of the Biden administration’s wide-ranging executive order on artificial intelligence is as a trial balloon to gauge what works, says Robert Brunner, the associate dean for innovation and chief disruption officer at the Gies College of Business at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

  • A photo compliation of this year's Clarivate Highly Cited awardees

    Eight Illinois scientists rank among world's most influential

    Eight researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign have been named to the 2023 Clarivate Analytics Highly Cited Researchers list. The list recognizes research scientists and social scientists who have demonstrated exceptional influence – reflected through their publication of multiple papers frequently cited by their peers during the last decade. 

  • Headshot of David Sepkoski

    What will be the impact of the decision to no longer name birds after people?

    The American Ornithological Society’s decision to rename birds that were named after people will allow us to consider how we remember historical figures and acknowledge the oppression in our nation’s history, says University of Illinois history professor David Sepkoski, who studies how biological and environmental sciences interact with culture.

  • Board to consider extension for Athletics Director Whitman through 2031

    At its November 16 meeting, the University of Illinois Board of Trustees will consider a three-year extension for U. of I. athletics director Josh Whitman through June 30, 2031.

  • Thomas Benson stands outside the Beckman Institute on campus.

    Do we need a new approach to prevent bird window strikes?

    In early October, nearly 1,000 birds perished after colliding with the windows of a convention center near Lake Michigan in Chicago, marking the largest mass bird die-off in decades. But bird window-strike fatalities are an ongoing threat. Illinois Natural History Survey wildlife ecologist Thomas J. Benson, an expert in bird population trends in Illinois, spoke to News Bureau life sciences editor Diana Yates about the problem and what new strategies may help.

  • Rashid Bashir stands in an atrium wearing a suit and tie.

    Rashid Bashir elected to National Academy of Medicine

    Rashid Bashir, the dean of The Grainger College of Engineering and a professor of bioengineering at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine. A pioneer at the intersection of engineering and medicine, Bashir was elected “for seminal contributions and visionary leadership in micro and nanoscale biosensors and diagnostics, bioengineering early detection of infection and sepsis, and education in engineering-based medicine with helping to establish the world's first engineering-based medical school.”

  • Portrait of Xinzhu Yu holding a model of a brain

    Yu receives NIH Director's New Innovator Award

    Xinzhu Yu, a professor of molecular and integrative physiology at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, is a recipient of the National Institutes of Health Director’s New Innovator Award from the NIH Common Fund’s High-Risk, High-Reward Research program. 

    According to the NIH, the New Innovator Award “supports investigators at each career stage who propose innovative research that, due to their inherent risk, may struggle in the traditional NIH peer-review process despite their transformative potential.” The award provides $2.4 million in funding over the next five years.

  • Photo of U of I Quad

    Big Ten Academic Alliance announces Academic Leadership and Executive Officers Program fellows

    The Big Ten Academic Alliance recently announced the 2023-24 fellows for its Academic Leadership Program and Department Executive Officers Seminar. Eleven U. of I. faculty members have been selected to participate.

  • Lena Shapiro, a clinical assistant professor of law and the inaugural director of the College of Law’s First Amendment Clinic

    What does the Kansas newspaper raid portend for free speech, journalism?

    The unsanctioned police raid on a newspaper in rural Kansas underscores the need to provide journalists with legal protections such as the recently re-introduced bipartisan Protect Reporters from Exploitive State Spying Act, says Lena Shapiro, a clinical assistant professor of law and the inaugural director of the College of Law’s First Amendment Clinic.

  • Two Illinois Students Awarded the Obama-Chesky Scholarship for Public Service

    Two University of Illinois students, Christiana Lewis, a junior in psychology, and Andres Vazquez, a junior in urban and regional planning, have received the Obama-Chesky Scholarship for Public Service.