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  • Insect Fear Film Festival examines insects' close relatives: crustaceans

    The 2020 Insect Fear Film Festival will feature crustaceans, which share a common ancestor with insects.

  • Yearlong series brings prominent authors to campus

    A U.S. poet laureate, best-selling authors and Pulitzer Prize winners are among the writers coming to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign for “A Year of Creative Writers.”

  • U of I student diagnosed with bacterial meningitis

    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign reports that a student has been diagnosed with bacterial meningitis and has been hospitalized for treatment. There is not believed to be a continued risk to others in the community.

  • Historic Latinx murals return to campus Feb. 21

    Murals removed for restoration from the former home of the department of Latina/Latino studies and La Casa Cultural Latina will be reintroduced to the university and the local community in a pair of events Feb. 21. A reinstallation at the Illini Union will be permanent, while another display at Spurlock Museum is expected to remain for a decade.

  • Trio honored Feb. 24 for investigation of Zhang case

    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Chancellor Robert J. Jones will honor three Division of Public Safety employees Feb. 24 with the Chancellor’s Medallion for their investigation of the June 2017 disappearance of visiting scholar Yingying Zhang.

  • Two Illinois professors named Sloan Research Fellows

    Two University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign scientists are among 126 recipients of the 2020 Sloan Research Fellowships from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. This honor is one of the most competitive and prestigious awards available to early career researchers. 

  • Survey measured student experiences of sexual misconduct, university's response

    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign released its third survey of student  experiences of sexual misconduct and the university’s response to those incidents. The Sexual Misconduct and Perceived Campus Response Survey was administered previously in 2015 and 2017.

  • Sottos elected to National Academy of Engineering

    Nancy Sottos, an engineering professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering. She is one of 87 new members and 18 international members announced by the Academy on Feb. 6.

  • Immigration justice talk part of CAS Abolition Initiative

    Activist organizers will talk about their work opposing detentions, deportations and criminalization of immigrant communities in a panel discussion. It is part of the Center for Advanced Study’s Abolition Initiative.

  • German diplomat recently posted in Ukraine to give EU Day keynote address

    A German diplomat based in Chicago but recently posted in the conflict zone of eastern Ukraine will speak on “The New Cold War: Liberal Democracy vs. Authoritarianism” as part of the annual European Union Day on Feb. 21 at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  • Are there alternatives to declining, disappearing newspapers?

    As many newspapers decline and disappear – highlighted by two Chicago Tribune reporters recently sounding the alarm about a perceived threat to the Trib – a journalism professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign touts the growth and viability of nonprofits and other alternatives.

  • Jill Ellis, coach with most wins in U.S. soccer history, named 2020 commencement speaker

    Jill Ellis, the head coach of the first women’s soccer team at Illinois who later won back-to-back FIFA Women’s World Cups as coach of the U.S. Women’s National Team, will be the 2020 commencement speaker at Illinois.

  • Media advisory: Coronavirus forum on campus Tuesday to discuss local response

    A panel of local health officials will discuss the coordinated local response to the global coronavirus concern at a 9 a.m. forum Tuesday, Jan. 28, at the Fire Service Institute, 11 Gerty Drive, Champaign. Experts will be available onsite for media interviews.

  • Targeted ads are coming to mainstream media. Should we care?

    Targeted advertising is coming to mainstream media, says an Illinois professor of digital media, bringing concerns about equality, division and “total surveillance.”

  • What is the coronavirus spreading across the globe?

    The first case of a novel strain of coronavirus has been confirmed in the United States. Virologist Leyi Wang, a professor of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Illinois, discussed the outbreak of the new strain with News Bureau biomedical sciences editor Liz Ahlberg Touchstone.

  • Would modifying payment of the earned income tax credit help struggling families?

    Receiving the earned income tax credit in installments rather than a lump sum benefitted more than 500 families living in Chicago public housing, U. of I. researcher Karen Kramer's team found in a new study.

  • Ancient and modern intersect in 'Hive' exhibition at Krannert Art Museum

    “Hive” – a combination of 18-foot-tall inflatable sculptures and an immersive sound installation – is on view for the coming year at Krannert Art Musem.

  • Illinois music professor awarded NEH Fellowship

    Music professor Christina Bashford was awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for a project examining violin culture in Britain.

  • The US used a drone to kill an Iranian general. What might be the consequences?

    An expert on the growing role of drones in warfare and terrorism discusses the implications of the recent killing of Iranian general Qassim Suleimani in a Q&A.

  • Classics course uses Greek tragedies to provide war insights

    A new course in classics uses Greek tragedies to study issues of war, trauma and displacement.

  • What do we really know about poverty?

    The holidays are a time we focus on those in need and heap scorn on the Scrooges and Mr. Potters who don’t. But how well do we understand poverty, in either the U.S. or globally? Illinois sociologist Brian Dill addresses some misconceptions.

  • What’s in the global carbon budget?

    The Global Carbon Project recently released its 2019 annual report, giving decision-makers access to data on atmospheric carbon concentrations, emissions and trends. Illinois atmospheric scientist Atul Jain is among the many scientists worldwide who contributed data to the report. News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian spoke with Jain about this year’s findings.

  • Hittite class offers glimpse of Bronze Age language, technology

    Illinois students in a Hittite class learn to write the ancient language in clay using cuneiform symbols.

  • US politics aside, what's the bigger picture in Ukraine?

    There’s more happening in Ukraine than just U.S. politics. A U. of I. professor talks about how the country is dealing with a long-term war and its consequences.

  • Alumna named Schwarzman Scholar

    Illinois alumna Katherine Pollman was selected as a Schwarzman Scholar, awarded to students who seek a better understanding of China’s role in the world.

     

  • Eight Illinois faculty members elected AAAS Fellows

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Eight professors at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been elected 2019 Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  • World AIDS Day commemorated with films at Krannert Art Museum, Krannert Center

    Krannert Art Museum and Krannert Center for the Performing Arts will screen short films addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemic to commemorate World AIDS Day.

  • Direct college admissions conference on campus Dec. 6

    A national conference on direct college admissions policies will be held Dec. 6 on the University of Illinois campus to explore how these programs can increase college access and boost enrollment.

  • Eight Illinois researchers rank among world’s most influential

    Eight faculty members at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been named to the 2019 Highly Cited Researchers list, a global listing of scientists who produced the past decade’s most influential papers.

  • Board to consider extension of Athletic Director Whitman through 2023-24

    The University of Illinois Board of Trustees will consider a contract extension of Athletic Director Josh Whitman through June 30, 2024.

  • Will anything ever change for the Kurds?

    A U. of I. specialist on Middle Eastern politics explains why Kurds often feel they have “no friends but the mountains,” why they’re a political threat to Turkey’s president and motivations for the recent Turkish attack on the Kurds in Syria.

  • BTN premieres documentary on pioneering educator

    “William L. Everitt: An Optimist’s Journey” premieres Nov. 11 at 9:30 p.m. CST/10:30 p.m. EST on the Big Ten Network. The new 30-minute documentary tells the story of the inventor, author, visionary and former dean of what is now The Grainger College of Engineering.

     

  • Martinis named vice chancellor for research and innovation

    Susan Martinis is the new vice chancellor for research and innovation at the University of Illinois, having served as interim vice chancellor for research since September 2017.

  • Film mines Zuckerberg's speeches for growth obsession

    University of Illinois researcher Ben Grosser’s new film uses 15 years of speeches by Mark Zuckerberg to look at his obsession with growth at any cost.

  • Chimesmaster Wood honored in memorial concert

    Longtime chimesmaster Sue Wood will be honored with a memorial concert Nov. 10 at Altgeld Hall.

  • 100 years of architecture student design work to be preserved, archived

    A project led by architecture professor Marci Uihlein will archive and make accessible 100 years of student design work, representing a history of architecture education.

  • U. of I. accessibility pioneer entering U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Hall of Fame

    Tim Nugent, the visionary first director of a ground-breaking University of Illinois program for students with disabilities, is being inducted posthumously into the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Hall of Fame.

  • Will hiding 'like' counts and other numbers improve social media?

    Social media companies are experimenting with hiding metrics on their platforms – something University of Illinois art professor Ben Grosser has been exploring since 2012 with his Demetricator projects.

  • Could cannabis be a pain relief alternative to opioids?

    The Opioid Alternative Pilot Project offers medical cannabis as a pain-relief option for those looking to avoid or reduce opioid use, said Julie Bobitt, the director of the Interdisciplinary Health Sciences program at Illinois.

  • Passes for 22nd 'Ebertfest' on sale Nov. 1

    Passes for the 22nd annual Roger Ebert’s Film Festival, or “Ebertfest,” go on sale Nov. 1.

  • Impeachment is underway: So who makes the rules?

    An impeachment investigation may be based in charges of wrongdoing, but it’s still a political process, says Illinois political science professor Gisela Sin. Even the design of rules and procedures is done strategically and with an eye on the outcome.

  • What’s behind surge in unaccompanied minors crossing southern U.S. border?

    The surge in unaccompanied children seeking refuge across the U.S. border can be attributed to poverty, natural disasters and the rise of gang recruitment in their home countries. But the biggest factor is that their countries of origin – Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Mexico – are effectively as violent as war zones, says Lauren R. Aronson, an associate clinical professor of law and the director of the Immigration Law Clinic at the University of Illinois College of Law.

  • Illinois theatre department opens season with plays addressing injustice, revenge

    The Illinois theatre department opens its season with stories of justice, injustice, revenge and redemption.

  • Media advisory: Sexual harassment summit open to media but recording not allowed

    A day-long summit on sexual harassment on Wednesday, Oct. 16 is open to the news media, but audio and visual recording will not be allowed.

  • Illinois releases faculty sexual misconduct report

    The Committee on Faculty Sexual Misconduct today released its report outlining 65 recommendations to change policies, processes and practices addressing sexual harassment and misconduct.

  • Artists consider nuclear industry's legacy in Krannert Art Museum exhibition

    The exhibition “Hot Spots: Radioactivity and the Landscape” at Krannert Art Museum spotlights the impact of the nuclear industry on the landscape.

  • Homecoming 2019 brings new events, parade route

    Illinois Homecoming takes place Oct. 13-19 with new events, a new parade route and former University of Illinois President Stanley O. Ikenberry serving as the parade grand marshal.

  • What explains the persistence of Hong Kong protest?

    Hong Kong’s nearly four-month protest is only the latest in a series, all centered on concerns about retaining freedoms and gaining the right to choose the city’s leadership, says University of Illinois history professor Poshek Fu, a Hong Kong native and specialist on modern China. The current protest movement is notable, however, for its social media-driven, guerrillalike tactics, its longevity and the international attention it has received.

  • How are Illinois birds faring?

    According to a new study reported in the journal Science, bird populations in North America have experienced a troubling decline in the past five decades. The scientists estimate the continent has lost close to 3 billion birds, roughly 29% of their total numbers in 1970. Senior wildlife ecologist Thomas J. Benson of the Illinois Natural History Survey discusses the status of birds in Illinois with News Bureau life sciences editor Diana Yates. Benson leads the Critical Trends Assessment Program, which monitors the biological condition of the state’s forests, wetlands and grasslands, and collects data on plants, birds and arthropods.

  • What’s at stake in auto workers strike?

    The strike of more than 47,000 auto workers is a way of recouping some of what union members lost during the Great Recession, says Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations at the Urbana campus of the University of Illinois and the director of the Labor Education Program in Chicago.