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  • Will anything ever change for the Kurds?

    A U. of I. specialist on Middle Eastern politics explains why Kurds often feel they have “no friends but the mountains,” why they’re a political threat to Turkey’s president and motivations for the recent Turkish attack on the Kurds in Syria.

  • BTN premieres documentary on pioneering educator

    “William L. Everitt: An Optimist’s Journey” premieres Nov. 11 at 9:30 p.m. CST/10:30 p.m. EST on the Big Ten Network. The new 30-minute documentary tells the story of the inventor, author, visionary and former dean of what is now The Grainger College of Engineering.

     

  • Martinis named vice chancellor for research and innovation

    Susan Martinis is the new vice chancellor for research and innovation at the University of Illinois, having served as interim vice chancellor for research since September 2017.

  • Film mines Zuckerberg's speeches for growth obsession

    University of Illinois researcher Ben Grosser’s new film uses 15 years of speeches by Mark Zuckerberg to look at his obsession with growth at any cost.

  • Chimesmaster Wood honored in memorial concert

    Longtime chimesmaster Sue Wood will be honored with a memorial concert Nov. 10 at Altgeld Hall.

  • 100 years of architecture student design work to be preserved, archived

    A project led by architecture professor Marci Uihlein will archive and make accessible 100 years of student design work, representing a history of architecture education.

  • U. of I. accessibility pioneer entering U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Hall of Fame

    Tim Nugent, the visionary first director of a ground-breaking University of Illinois program for students with disabilities, is being inducted posthumously into the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Hall of Fame.

  • Will hiding 'like' counts and other numbers improve social media?

    Social media companies are experimenting with hiding metrics on their platforms – something University of Illinois art professor Ben Grosser has been exploring since 2012 with his Demetricator projects.

  • Could cannabis be a pain relief alternative to opioids?

    The Opioid Alternative Pilot Project offers medical cannabis as a pain-relief option for those looking to avoid or reduce opioid use, said Julie Bobitt, the director of the Interdisciplinary Health Sciences program at Illinois.

  • Passes for 22nd 'Ebertfest' on sale Nov. 1

    Passes for the 22nd annual Roger Ebert’s Film Festival, or “Ebertfest,” go on sale Nov. 1.

  • Impeachment is underway: So who makes the rules?

    An impeachment investigation may be based in charges of wrongdoing, but it’s still a political process, says Illinois political science professor Gisela Sin. Even the design of rules and procedures is done strategically and with an eye on the outcome.

  • What’s behind surge in unaccompanied minors crossing southern U.S. border?

    The surge in unaccompanied children seeking refuge across the U.S. border can be attributed to poverty, natural disasters and the rise of gang recruitment in their home countries. But the biggest factor is that their countries of origin – Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Mexico – are effectively as violent as war zones, says Lauren R. Aronson, an associate clinical professor of law and the director of the Immigration Law Clinic at the University of Illinois College of Law.

  • Illinois theatre department opens season with plays addressing injustice, revenge

    The Illinois theatre department opens its season with stories of justice, injustice, revenge and redemption.

  • Media advisory: Sexual harassment summit open to media but recording not allowed

    A day-long summit on sexual harassment on Wednesday, Oct. 16 is open to the news media, but audio and visual recording will not be allowed.

  • Illinois releases faculty sexual misconduct report

    The Committee on Faculty Sexual Misconduct today released its report outlining 65 recommendations to change policies, processes and practices addressing sexual harassment and misconduct.

  • Artists consider nuclear industry's legacy in Krannert Art Museum exhibition

    The exhibition “Hot Spots: Radioactivity and the Landscape” at Krannert Art Museum spotlights the impact of the nuclear industry on the landscape.

  • Homecoming 2019 brings new events, parade route

    Illinois Homecoming takes place Oct. 13-19 with new events, a new parade route and former University of Illinois President Stanley O. Ikenberry serving as the parade grand marshal.

  • What explains the persistence of Hong Kong protest?

    Hong Kong’s nearly four-month protest is only the latest in a series, all centered on concerns about retaining freedoms and gaining the right to choose the city’s leadership, says University of Illinois history professor Poshek Fu, a Hong Kong native and specialist on modern China. The current protest movement is notable, however, for its social media-driven, guerrillalike tactics, its longevity and the international attention it has received.

  • How are Illinois birds faring?

    According to a new study reported in the journal Science, bird populations in North America have experienced a troubling decline in the past five decades. The scientists estimate the continent has lost close to 3 billion birds, roughly 29% of their total numbers in 1970. Senior wildlife ecologist Thomas J. Benson of the Illinois Natural History Survey discusses the status of birds in Illinois with News Bureau life sciences editor Diana Yates. Benson leads the Critical Trends Assessment Program, which monitors the biological condition of the state’s forests, wetlands and grasslands, and collects data on plants, birds and arthropods.

  • What’s at stake in auto workers strike?

    The strike of more than 47,000 auto workers is a way of recouping some of what union members lost during the Great Recession, says Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations at the Urbana campus of the University of Illinois and the director of the Labor Education Program in Chicago.

  • Krannert Center performance “HOME” provides inspiration for Pygmalion’s hackathon

    The performance of “HOME” at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts is providing the inspiration for PYGHACK, the culture festival Pygmalion’s hackathon. Both consider issues related to the concepts of home and an inclusive community.

  • Ebert Symposium to feature film director Gregory Nava

    Gregory Nava, director of Latino films such as “El Norte,” “My Family” and “Selena,” will discuss his career and challenges, as well as diversity in the movie industry, as part of the Chaz and Roger Ebert Symposium coming Sept. 27 to the University of Illinois.

  • Illinois Architecture reveals presence and progress of women in the profession

    A Women’s Reunion and Symposium at the School of Architecture will recognize the contributions of female architecture graduates.

  • Class of 2023 sets records for enrollment, diversity, excellence

    The new freshman class at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is the largest, most academically talented and most diverse in the history of the university.

  • Five professors named University Scholars for Urbana-Champaign campus

    Five Urbana-Champaign campus professors have been named University Scholars in recognition of their excellence in teaching, scholarship and service.

  • Endangered animals project looks at tigers, habitat loss, climate change

    University of Illinois art professor Deke Weaver will present “TIGER” this fall. It’s the fifth performance in his project “The Unreliable Bestiary,” telling stories about endangered animals and habitats.

  • Ebert Symposium to focus on inclusion in movies and media

    This year’s Ebert Symposium will focus on inclusion and diversity in the media industry, with a keynote address provided by Stacy Smith, director of the Annenberg Inclusion Initiative, a global think tank studying inequality in entertainment.

  • Would changes to capital gains taxes spur the economy?

    Indexing capital gains to inflation could be a simple fix to stimulate a teetering economy, but several significant implementation hurdles remain, said Richard L. Kaplan, an internationally recognized expert on U.S. tax policy and the Guy Raymond Jones Chair in Law at Illinois.

  • Krannert Art Museum invites new perspectives on modern and contemporary art

    “Art Since 1948” – a new, long-term installation at Krannert Art Museum – showcases the museum’s modern and contemporary collection.

  • Computer science education for Illinois children, teachers to be summit focus

    The inaugural Illinois Statewide K-12 Computer Science Education Summit will bring together teachers, lawmakers and others stakeholders to discuss computer science education in Illinois schools.

  • Matsuri Festival at Japan House incorporates Indian culture

    Matsuri Festival at Japan House celebrates the end of summer with Asian food, art and musical performances.

  • Chancellor's Scholars named to Campus Honors Program

    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign names 161 freshmen and sophomores Chancellor’s Scholars in the Campus Honors Program this fall, chosen for their academic excellence and leadership potential.

     

  • Would cutting payroll taxes help prevent recession?

    Cutting the payroll tax could represent the middle-class tax cut that President Trump campaigned on – although changes would need to go through the legislative process and any economic stimulus likely wouldn’t been seen until after the November 2020 election, said Richard L. Kaplan, an internationally recognized expert on U.S. tax policy and the Guy Raymond Jones Chair in Law at Illinois.

  • Flatlands Dance Film Festival to screen documentary on flamenco dancer, short films

    The Flatlands Dance Film Festival will screen a documentary about Spanish flamenco dancer “La Chana” and short films from around the world.

  • Graduates, Dean's List, Bronze Tablet honorees named for May 2019

    The University of Illinois announces graduates, Dean’s List and Bronze Tablet honorees for the 2019 spring semester. 

  • Campus to enforce total ban on tobacco products use

    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is now a 100% smoke- and tobacco-free campus. The updated policy builds upon the smoke-free policy implemented in 2014 that banned the use of all smoke-producing tobacco products on campus.

  • Germany transformed under Nazis in 100 days. Do we understand why?

    With world leaders gathering Sept. 1 to mark the 80th anniversary of the start of World War II in Europe, U. of I. history professor Peter Fritzsche describes how Germans came to embrace Nazi rule, especially in Hitler’s first 100 days.

  • Campus to announce Yingying Zhang endowment fund

    Family members and campus officials will discuss Yingying’s Fund, an endowment to honor Illinois scholar Yingying Zhang, at a rescheduled news conference Aug. 19 on the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign campus.The fund will assist international students in crisis and their families.

  • Krannert Art Museum acquires Illinois alumnus Hal Fischer’s conceptual photographs

    Krannert Art Museum has acquired the work of pioneering gay photographer and University of Illinois alumnus Hal Fischer.

  • How can educators, coaches support student-athletes’ academic success?

    Coaches and educators should work together to help athletes achieve their full potential, U. of I. scholars and former collegiate athletes Joseph L. Cross and Bruce W. Fouke say in a new study.

  • Correction: Yingying Fund announcement postponed

    Correction: At the request of the family’s attorney, the public announcement of Yingying’s Fund scheduled for 10 a.m. Aug. 7 on the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign campus has been postponed. A new date and time have not been yet been determined. 

  • Illinois social work professor named Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellow

    Liliane Windsor, a professor of social work at the University of Illinois, has been named a Health Policy Fellow by the National Academy of Medicine and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

  • Deaths

    Dolores Jane Byers ... Martin Joseph Knanishu ... Warren C. McCarty ... Kurtis Isaiah Pealer ... Patricia Eileen Price ... Selma Katharine Richardson ... Grace Christine (McCormick) Prestin Samford ... Winton U. Solberg

  • Illini Fest this Thursday at Park Grill Plaza of Millennium Park

    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is holding Illini Fest, its first-ever downtown Chicago festival. The event will include more than 40 displays and interactive experiences from colleges and units, including robots, photo booth, virtual reality experience and a solar telescope.

  • Can a state copyright its own laws – and prevent citizens from republishing them?

    The pending Supreme Court case Georgia v. Public.Resource.Org will test the legality of a state copyrighting its own laws, which could pose a challenge to legal research, scholarship and public access to the law, said U. of I. copyright law expert Sara R. Benson.

  • Santos named iSchool dean at Illinois

    Eunice Santos will become the dean of the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign effective Aug. 16, pending approval by the University of Illinois Board of Trustees. Andreas C. Cangellaris, the vice chancellor for academic affairs and provost, recommended the appointment to Chancellor Robert Jones after the conclusion of a yearlong national search.

  • Deaths

    Phyllis Gordon ... Richard H. “Dick” Howard ... Paul Dale Shaw

     

     

     

     

  • Six Illinois researchers receive Presidential Early Career Award

    Six researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign were named recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on young professionals at the outset of their independent research careers. 

  • June in Illinois featured more rain and lower temperatures than average

    Above-average rainfall continued in June, along with an elevated risk of flooding in some areas of Illinois, according to Brian Kerschner, a spokesperson for the Illinois State Climatologist Office at the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

  • Illini Fest event paints Chicago orange and blue

    Illini Fest, a downtown festival planned for July 18 in Chicago’s Park Grill Plaza of Millennium Park, brings the university experience to the more than 150,000 Fighting Illini alumni living in Chicagoland.