blog navigation

blog posts

  • Faster protein folding achieved through nanosecond pressure jump

    Martin Gruebele, the James R. Eiszner Professor of Chemistry at the U. of I. and corresponding author of the paper, says that prodding proteins to fold by suddenly removing high pressure (a technique also known as "pressure jumping") through electrical bursting makes for a "kinder, gentler way" of inducing proteins to fold.

    Martin Gruebele, the James R. Eiszner Professor of Chemistry at the U. of I. and corresponding author of the paper, says that prodding proteins to fold by suddenly removing high pressure (a technique also known as "pressure jumping") through electrical bursting makes for a "kinder, gentler way" of inducing proteins to fold.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

    Images

    • Close

      Martin Gruebele, the James R. Eiszner Professor of Chemistry at the U. of I. and corresponding author of the paper, says that prodding proteins to fold by suddenly removing high pressure (a technique also known as "pressure jumping") through electrical bursting makes for a "kinder, gentler way" of inducing proteins to fold.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

blog posts