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  • Physicists localize 3-D matter waves for first time

    An illustration of Anderson localization. The green balloons represent disordered barriers that localize the sound of the trumpet at its source.

    An illustration of Anderson localization. The green balloons represent disordered barriers that localize the sound of the trumpet at its source.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      An illustration of Anderson localization. The green balloons represent disordered barriers that localize the sound of the trumpet at its source.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      Physics professor Brian DeMarco, center, and graduate students Stanimir Kondov, left, and William McGehee were the first to trap waves of quantum matter in three dimensions.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer The impact of disorder on waves depends strongly on their energy in three dimensions. The high-energy red wave can freely propagate outward through the disordered green laser in the experiment, but the low-energy blue wave is trapped, or localized, by reflections from the disorder.

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      The impact of disorder on waves depends strongly on their energy in three dimensions. The high-energy red wave can freely propagate outward through the disordered green laser in the experiment, but the low-energy blue wave is trapped, or localized, by reflections from the disorder.

      Graphic by Brian DeMarco

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