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  • Spillways can divert sand from river to rebuild wetlands

    Sand deposits were worked into trains of dunes when flood water flowed into the Bonnet Carr Spillway in Lousiana. Once the flood subsided and the spillway was closed, the water drained and dried from the spillway, thereby exposing the dunes. Trees and shrubs near the top of the oblique aerial photograph provide scale.

    Sand deposits were worked into trains of dunes when flood water flowed into the Bonnet Carr Spillway in Lousiana. Once the flood subsided and the spillway was closed, the water drained and dried from the spillway, thereby exposing the dunes. Trees and shrubs near the top of the oblique aerial photograph provide scale.

    Photo by Jeffrey Nittrouer

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      Sand deposits were worked into trains of dunes when flood water flowed into the Bonnet Carr Spillway in Lousiana. Once the flood subsided and the spillway was closed, the water drained and dried from the spillway, thereby exposing the dunes. Trees and shrubs near the top of the oblique aerial photograph provide scale.

      Photo by Jeffrey Nittrouer

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      Aerial image of the extensive sand deposits in the Bonnet Carr Spillway, exposed after the water had drained and dried from the spillway. Tire tracks near the bottom of the photo and a railroad track and trestle at the top of the photograph provide scale.

      Photo by Jeffrey Nittrouer

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      Exposed dune field in the Bonnet Carr Spillway. A "sea of sand" extends to nearly the BCS structure in the background, which can be seen just below the line of the refinery stacks. Field assistant provides scale in the foreground.

      Photo by Jeffrey Nittrouer

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