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  • Study reveals stem cells in a human parasite

    The researchers discovered that Schistosoma mansoni harbors a population of non-sexual stem cells (yellow dots dispersed throughout the organism) that replenish its tissues and contribute to its ability to live in its host for decades.

    The researchers discovered that Schistosoma mansoni harbors a population of non-sexual stem cells (yellow dots dispersed throughout the organism) that replenish its tissues and contribute to its ability to live in its host for decades.

    Micrograph by Jim Collins

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      The researchers discovered that Schistosoma mansoni harbors a population of non-sexual stem cells (yellow dots dispersed throughout the organism) that replenish its tissues and contribute to its ability to live in its host for decades.

      Micrograph by Jim Collins

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      University of Illinois cell and developmental biology professor Phillip Newmark, rear, postdoctoral researcher James J. Collins III and their colleagues discovered that Schistosoma mansoni renews its tissues with stem cells.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      Infection with the parasite Schistosoma mansoni afflicts about 230 million people around the world, most in impoverished areas without access to clean water.

      Micrograph by Jim Collins and Ana Vieira

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