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  • Potent, puzzling and (now less) toxic: Team discovers how antifungal drug works

    A new collaboration solved a decades-old medical mystery involving an antifungal agent. Pictured, from left: graduate student Grant Hisao; chemistry professor Martin Burke; graduate students Alex Cioffi, Katrina Diaz, Marcus Tuttle and Mary Clay; chemistry professor Chad Rienstra; and graduate students Brice Uno, Tom Anderson and Matt Endo.

    A new collaboration solved a decades-old medical mystery involving an antifungal agent. Pictured, from left: graduate student Grant Hisao; chemistry professor Martin Burke; graduate students Alex Cioffi, Katrina Diaz, Marcus Tuttle and Mary Clay; chemistry professor Chad Rienstra; and graduate students Brice Uno, Tom Anderson and Matt Endo.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      A new collaboration solved a decades-old medical mystery involving an antifungal agent. Pictured, from left: graduate student Grant Hisao; chemistry professor Martin Burke; graduate students Alex Cioffi, Katrina Diaz, Marcus Tuttle and Mary Clay; chemistry professor Chad Rienstra; and graduate students Brice Uno, Tom Anderson and Matt Endo.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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  • To reach Martin Burke, call 217-244-8726; email mdburke@illinois.edu. To reach Chad Rienstra, call 217-244-4655; email rienstra@illinois.edu.

    The Nature Chemical Biology paper, “Amphotericin Forms an Extramembranous and Fungicidal Sterol Sponge,” is available online or to members of the media from the U. of I. News Bureau. The JACS paper, “C2′-OH of Amphotericin B Plays an Important Role in Binding the Primary Sterol of Human Cells but Not Yeast Cells,” is available online or from the U. of I. News Bureau.