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  • Chancellor's Distinguished Staff Award honors eight employees

    The Chancellor’s Distinguished Staff Award honors eight civil service staff employees for exceptional performance.

  • Long elected to National Academy of Sciences

    Stephen P. Long, a professor of crop sciences and plant biology at the University of Illinois, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest professional honors a scientist can receive.

  • U. of I. earns Bronze Level EMS Ready Campus status

    Illini Emergency Medical Services, a program of the Illinois Fire Service Institute that provides nontransport care to the 58,000 students, staff and faculty members at the Urbana-Champaign campus, was recognized as a Bronze Level EMS Ready Campus at the annual conference of the National Collegiate Emergency Medical Services Foundation.

  • Volunteers needed for Dump & Run collections starting May 6

    The University YMCA is seeking volunteers and donations for its 18th annual Dump & Run recycling program. Collections during the May period of Dump & Run will be held exclusively at the Stock Pavilion, 1402 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Urbana, because the MCORE construction project limits access to  the University YMCA building on Wright Street.

  • Nigh named Office Professional of the Year

    Penny Nigh, an administrative aide and assistant to Executive Associate Chancellor for Administration and University Relations Wanda E. Ward, was honored by the Illinois Administrative Professional at the University of Illinois (formerly The Secretariat) with the 2019 Office Professional of the Year Award.

  • Deaths

    Louis H. “Bud” Mesker ... Darcy Elizabeth Strack

  • Illinois music professor awarded Carnegie Fellowship

    Illinois ethnomusicologist Michael Silvers, who specializes in the music of Brazil, has been awarded a 2019 Andrew Carnegie Fellowship. He’ll use the fellowship to research a book that will examine the aesthetics and natural resources of instrument-making using Brazilian woods.

  • Krannert Center for the Performing Arts announces 2019-20 Youth Series

    Since 1982, thousands of young people have experienced the performing arts at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts by attending creative daytime programs. These performances are designed to invigorate students’ imaginations while also addressing Common Core and Illinois learning standards.

  • How does sexual harassment affect young women in physics?

    In a study reported in the journal Physical Review Physics Education Research, nearly 75% of 471 undergraduate women in physics who responded to a survey offered during a professional conference reported having experienced at least one type of sexual harassment – mostly gender harassment – in their field. U. of I. anthropology professor Kathryn Clancy, a co-author of the report, talked to News Bureau life sciences editor Diana Yates about the study, which also examined the respondents’ feelings of belonging and legitimacy as scientists and scholars.

  • Deaths

    Ronald L. Miner ... Charles Edward Olson ... James H. Wyatt Sr.

     

  • What was lost in the Notre Dame Cathedral fire?

    Notre Dame Cathedral, severely damaged by fire this week, is widely understood as “the beating heart of France,” with global significance beyond that, says one University of Illinois historian in a Q&A. Another notes how a key aspect of music as we know it today was invented for the cathedral’s unique resonant space, a soundscape lost in the fire.

  • Illinois chancellor and chemist elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

    Chancellor Robert J. Jones and chemistry professor Catherine J. Murphy have been elected as members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

  • Deaths

    Janet Lynn “Jaelyn” Jefferson ... Sharon Jo Shiu

  • How is Illinois contributing to the Event Horizon Telescope Project?

    The Event Horizon Telescope Project announced that it has captured the first image of a black hole. The feature is located at the center of Messier 87 – a giant elliptical galaxy in the constellation Virgo. News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian spoke with University of Illinois physics and astronomy professor Charles Gammie, who heads up the theory working group for the large, multi-institutional collaboration.

  •  'Queering UP the Arts' exhibit at University YMCA

    The UP Center, in collaboration with the University YMCA’s Art @ the Y program, is hosting the exhibit “Queering UP the Arts: Celebration of Queer Artists and Artworks,”  on display through May 13 in the University Y’s Murphy Gallery. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

    The gallery, located at 1001 S. Wright St., Champaign, is open Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

    The exhibition includes submissions from adult and youth artists from Champaign, Urbana, Mahomet, Saybrook and Bloomington. The artworks are of various mediums including digital prints, photographs, cyanotypes, spray paint, acrylics and many other types.

    Art @ the Y seeks to engage issues of social justice through quality arts programming. The UP Center was founded in 2009 as an organization to advocate for the equality, wellness, advocacy and visibility of the LGBTQ communities in Champaign County.

  • Chicago Symphony Orchestra cancels April 16 performance at Krannert Center

    The Chicago Symphony Orchestra Association announced that CSOA-presented concerts scheduled to take place from Wednesday, April 10, to Tuesday, April 23, are canceled due to the current strike by musicians of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

  • Author to host workshop and discuss her novel ‘Forest Dark’ April 9

    Nicole Krauss, an award-winning and best-selling author, will talk about her latest novel, “Forest Dark,” and her other works at two campus events April 9.

  • NEH announces support for four U. of I. projects

    The National Endowment for the Humanities has announced $28.6 million in grants to support 233 humanities projects nationwide, including four at the University of Illinois. Each of the Illinois researchers will receive an award of $6,000.

  • Health Make-a-Thon to award $10K in idea support to 10 area innovators

    An initiative of the Carle Illinois College of Medicine, the Health Make-a-Thon aims to help Champaign County residents bring to life their ideas for improving human health through the Health Maker Lab – a network of maker labs, design spaces and fabrication facilities across the Urbana-Champaign campus of the University of Illinois. Out of 140 ideas submitted, 20 finalists have been selected to pitch their concepts to a panel of judges and a live audience on April 13. Ten will each win $10,000 in Health Maker Lab resources to create a prototype of their idea.

  • Deaths

    Manfred Raether ... Ralph Stoner Wolfe

  • University of Illinois Library announces Edible Book Festival

    The 14th Annual Edible Book Festival, sponsored by the University Library at the University of Illinois and Common Ground Food Co-operative, will be held April 6. The campus and local community are invited to experience this unique intersection of literature and cuisine.

  • March rainfall in Illinois caused major flooding

    Significant rain in March led to above-normal soil moisture in Illinois and major flooding events for many local streams and rivers, according to Brian Kerschner, a spokesperson for the Illinois State Climatologist Office at the U. of I.’s Illinois State Water Survey. 

  • Illinois history professor awarded ACLS Fellowship

    University of Illinois history professor Marsha Barrett has been awarded a prestigious ACLS Fellowship.

  • Deaths

    Frank Gallo ... Charles E. “Charlie” Hartman ... Helen Wright

  • DoCha announces 10th annual downtown music festival

    DoCha, downtown Champaign’s premiere free chamber music festival, announces its 10th anniversary season, Friday to Sunday, April 5-7.

  • Visiting scholar to present 'Can You Trust Your Local News?' lecture

    Visiting scholar to present 'Can You Trust Your Local News' lecturePenny Muse Abernathy, a Knight Chair of journalism and digital media economics at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, will present her lecture “Can You Trust Your Local News?” Saturday, April 6, at 12:20 p.m. in Room 300 of Levis Faculty Center, 919 W. Illinois St., Urbana.

  • Come Home Gala celebrates 50 years of Krannert Center for the Performing Arts  

    Come Home to Krannert Center weekend, Friday-Sunday, April 12-14, celebrates Krannert Center for the Performing Arts’ 50th anniversary. The cornerstone event of the weekend, the Come Home Gala, will be held in the center’s lobby Saturday, April 13 at 6 p.m.

  • 'Brexit' is coming – or maybe not. Why is this happening?

    An Illinois political science professor explains some of the forces behind “Brexit” and why it’s so difficult.

  • Media advisory: Day of Service events planned April 6

    Information provided for news media interested in covering the Day of Service on the U. of I. at Urbana-Champaign campus Saturday, April 6. Hundreds of volunteers will package 28,000 pounds of food for delivery to families in need throughout eastern Illinois.

     

  • Deaths

    Allan G. Mueller ... Stephen Steele Slivon

  • August and December 2018 graduates, Dean's List honorees named

    The University of Illinois lists the 7,690 students named to the Dean's List in December, as well as the 2,909 December graduates and 1,385 August graduates.

  • 'Ebertfest' full schedule announced, with actresses Gershon, Madsen, Tilly as guests

    This year’s Ebert Film Fest will include “Almost Famous” and “Sideways,” documentaries on Maya Angelou and Fred Rogers, and guest actresses Gina Gershon, Virginia Madsen and Jennifer Tilly.

  • Museum presents chess exhibit

    The new exhibit “Chess: Gymnasium of the Mind” opens April 4 in Spurlock Museum of World Culture’s central core gallery, 600 S. Gregory St., Urbana. The display features a variety of chess sets from around the world highlighting unique pieces, boards and moves, and runs through July 7.

  • Why do so few community college grads transfer to elite colleges?

    Eboni Zamani-Gallaher, the director of the Office of Community College Research and Leadership at the University of Illinois, discusses why so few community college students transfer to selective colleges and universities.

  • Bitter cold in January likely won’t reduce field crop pests

    Despite record cold air temperatures, soil temperatures averaged slightly warmer than normal in Illinois this winter. Consequently, the arctic conditions are expected to have little effect on overwintering field crop insect pest populations.

    A wide range of air temperatures occurred in Illinois this winter with periods of warmer temperatures in the 60s and 70s and extreme cold with lows in the -30s. Overall, temperatures averaged 29.9 degrees, 0.8 degrees above normal for the season.

  • Aretha Franklin concert film 'Amazing Grace' to open Ebert Film Fest

    An Aretha Franklin concert film from nearly 50 years ago, now restored and released, will open this year’s Roger Ebert’s Film Festival, or “Ebertfest.”

  • Deaths

    Dick J. Albers ... Martha Baxter North

  • The Midwest has a new national park. How did that happen?

    The Midwest has a new national park at Indiana Dunes, and a University of Illinois professor explains how it happened and why the park is valuable.

  • Deaths

    Paul D. Bermingham ... William “Bill” G. Dean ... Arthur J. Harper ... Lois Ann Allhands Harpst

     

  • Mount Carroll reclaims title for record minimum temperature in Illinois 

    An arctic outbreak in late January led to widespread bitterly cold temperatures across much of the Upper Midwest, including Illinois. On the morning of Jan. 31, the cooperative weather observer at Mount Carroll in Carroll County reported a temperature of -38 degrees.  

  • Brazilian music lecture, recital presented

    Brazilian music educator and scholar Juliana Cantarelli Vita presents a lecture and recital on Afro-Brazilian percussion genres, Saturday, March 30 at 7 p.m. at Spurlock Museum of World Cultures, 600 S. Gregory St., Urbana.

  • Mercer University professor of Christian ethics to deliver Thulin Lecture in Religion

    David P. Gushee, a professor of Christian ethics and the director of the Center for Theology and Public Life at Mercer University, Macon, Georgia, will deliver the annual Marjorie Hall Thulin Lecture in Religion on Wednesday, March 6, at 7:30 p.m., in Knight Auditorium, Spurlock Museum of World Cultures, 600 S. Gregory St., Urbana.

  • Talk describes early South Asian student presence at Illinois

    Since at least 1906, South Asian students have attended the University of Illinois. In a talk scheduled for March 21 at 5 p.m. at Spurlock Museum of World Cultures, archivist Salvatore V. De Sando will highlight some of the first South Asian students, early South Asian student-organized events on campus and early South Asian student organizations. This presentation is based on original archival research, and historic campus photos will be featured to bring the story to life.

  • Mark Morris Dance Group to perform 'Pepperland' at Krannert Center

    In March, the New York-based Mark Morris Dance Group returns to its Midwest home at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts. Over the course of its one-week residency, the company will conduct public engagement work with the Champaign, Urbana and U. of I. community and present two ticketed performances of “Pepperland.”

  • February was stormy, wet, cold in Illinois

    February was particularly cold and stormy in Illinois, with an almost constant succession of storms resulting in moderate snow accumulations for the northern counties and persistent rain events and widespread flooding for the far southern counties.

    The preliminary average statewide precipitation was 3.33 inches, which is 1.27 inches above the long-term average, according to Brian Kerschner, a spokesperson for the Illinois State Climatologist Office at the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois. 

  • Deaths

    Paul A. Boatman ... Marcel Franciscono

  • Is there a cure for potholes?

    Temperatures may be on the rise, but many motorists and pedestrians remain focused on the ground as they attempt to navigate safely around the many potholes that develop this time of year. Industrial and enterprise systems engineering professor Henrique M. Reis spoke with Illinois News Bureau physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian about how potholes form and if there are any potential solutions.

  • Illinois Theatre presents sensory-friendly performance of 'The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time'

    Illinois Theatre continues its 2018-19 season with “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time” by Simon Stephens. Adapted from Mark Haddon’s award-winning novel of the same name, the play follows Christopher Boone, a 15-year-old on the autism spectrum, as he explores the meanings of family and forgiveness while investigating the death of his neighbor’s dog. The play is told through Christopher’s eyes and the company has worked with The Autism Project to tell this story in a way that is truthful to families who experience life with autism spectrum disorder.

    On Saturday, March 9, at 1 p.m.,  Illinois Theatre will offer a sensory-friendly performancefor adult and young adult audience members (and their families) who are on the autism spectrum or who otherwise need a less intense sensory experience. Through modifications of the lighting, sound and media designs, theperformance is intended as a safe and welcoming opportunity for adults and young adults with autism and their supporters.

    The relaxed, sensory-friendly environment may also work well for those who have other chronic issues, may not be able to sit for long periods of time, or simply enjoy a more casual performance experience. “Social Story”booklets will be available in advance to help audience members know what to expect during their visit to Krannert Center for the Performing Arts and during the play itself. Audiences are invited to bring comfort items (fidget toys, blankets, etc.) with them and to use a “safe space” area outside of the theater as needed, where a live video feed of the performance will be available.

    The production contains the graphic depiction of an animal’s death, which may not be suitable for all viewers. The play is based on Haddon’s young adult novel and is most appropriate for audiences age 14 and up.

    Tickets are $10 and available through the Krannert Center Ticket Office, at KrannertCenter.com, or by calling 217-333-6280.

    Performances without the sensory-friendly modifications run from Thursday, Feb. 28 to Sunday, March 10.

  • Deaths

    Lois B. Guiher

  • Exhibit features images created by architect of Granada, Spain

    “’Before the sun is set ...’: Imagining Granada between light and lines,” an exhibition of works on paper by architect Jose Vazquez representing the architecture, landscape and city of historic Granada, Spain, begins Monday, March 4, at 5:30 p.m. in Temple Hoyne Buell Hall, 611 E. Lorado Taft Drive in Champaign.