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  • LAS in C-U: Liberal arts fair connects students with internships

    Fall semester fair helps students find local employers.

  • Hear My Voice: News project makes space for inclusive conversation

    Journalism project creates a space for dialogue.

  • Undergrads choose their own adventure in this wildlife research group

    Don’t be fooled by the name, the wildlife and chronic wasting disease research group has a broader mission than you might think. Yes, the research focuses on white-tailed deer, primarily, and on CWD, a baffliing affliction of deer and elk. But for the dozens of undergraduate students who have joined this collaborative effort over the years, the group also is a portal, of sorts, to wide-ranging adventures in research.

  • Interactive Projects

    Interactive art studio at University of Illinois teaches students coding, building circuits

  • Social Work Ambassadors: Students welcome peers to their field of study

    Social Work Ambassadors promote the School of Social Work programs, courses to students curious about the major and the careers available to alumni with degrees in the field.

  • LabEscape: Science feeds adventure through escape room

    Escape the room if you can, but the physics is inescapable.

  • Illinois scientist named Packard Fellow

    Pinshane Huang, a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is among 18 early career researchers to receive 2017 Packard Fellowships from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

  • Two undergrads improve plant carbon-cycle models

    In the summer of 2012, two undergraduate students tackled a problem that plant ecology experts had overlooked for 30 years. The students demonstrated that different plant species vary in how they take in carbon dioxide and emit water through stomata, the pores in their leaves. The data boosted the accuracy of mathematical models of carbon and water fluxes through plant leaves by 30 to 60 percent.

  • Estonian ambassador to address the state of the EU

    The Estonian ambassador to the U.S. will address the state of the European Union as part of EU Day on Oct. 20.

  • U. of I. nutrition scientist Sharon Donovan elected to National Academy of Medicine

    Sharon M. Donovan, a professor of nutrition and the Melissa M. Noel Endowed Chair in Nutrition and Health at the University of Illinois, was elected today (Oct. 16) to the National Academy of Medicine.

  • Carle Illinois College of Medicine receives preliminary accreditation

    The Carle Illinois College of Medicine, the first engineering-based medical school, has received preliminary acreditation from the Liaison Committee on Medical Education and is recruiting students for its first class.

     

  • Deaths

    Mildred Luther ... Dr. John Roger Powell ... Dr. George “Bruce” Thow

  • Media Advisory: Campaign kickoff event Friday at State Farm Center

    News media are invited to set up for the Urbana campus's fundraising campaign inaugural event at the State Farm Center as early as 6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 13.

  • Expert on pre-language communication to give annual Goldstick Lecture

    Nancy C. Brady, an expert on pre-language communication and language development in young children, will give the annual Goldstick Family Lecture in the Study of Communication Disorders at the University of Illinois.

  • University Primary School to hold open house

    University Primary School, the laboratory school of the College of Education, is hosting an open house for the community Thursday, Oct. 19. The school is located at the Children’s Research Center, 51 Gerty Drive, Champaign.

  • How is Illinois contributing to gravitational wave research?

    Illinois research scientist, NCSA Gravity Group leader Eliu Huerta Escudero on what gravitational waves are, how they were discovered, and the huge data processing effort behind the breakthrough

  • Deaths

    Ken Gunji ... Richard Pelczar ... Walter E. Schroeder

  • One Book One Campus features graphic novel tackling religious intolerance, gender politics

    The Illini Union will feature “Ms. Marvel #1: No Normal” by G. Willow Wilson as this year’s One Book One Campus selection. Wilson will speak at a free public lecture Friday, Oct. 6, at 7 p.m. in the Illini Union Ballroom. An informal reception and book signing will follow.

  • October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month

    To increase awareness of domestic violence and its consequences, the University of Illinois’ Women’s Resources Center and Courage Connection, along with other campus and community organizations, will host activities and events throughout October. 

  • Antibiotic-resistant infections in pets: What now?

    Rates of antibiotic-resistant infections in companion animals are rising at an alarming rate. An Illinois veterinarian discusses what can be done about it.

  • Deaths

    Robert James Woodard

  • Do politics or protests have a place in sports?

    A U. of I. professor who specializes in the history of sports says it’s not realistic to see sporting events as free of politics or protest

  • Does President Trump’s tax reform plan add up?

    President Trump’s much-hyped tax overhaul plan is tantamount to a 'tax-reform wish list,' said Richard L. Kaplan, an internationally recognized expert on U.S. tax policy

  • How should the Supreme Court rule on gerrymandering?

    An Illinois professor says a gerrymandering case before the Supreme Court could have profound effects on U.S. democracy and suggests a technological solution.

  • Deaths

    Carl Deal ... William Dentler Ramm Jr.

  • Is the future of hurricane forecasting in danger?

    Satellites that help forecast hurricanes require constant upkeep and frequent replacement, but budget cuts have left the future of hurricane monitoring satellites in doubt

  • Deaths

    Betty Ann Everence ... Terry L. Jamison ... Jack Arthur May ... Barbara Ann Yates 

  • Farewell, Cassini: What have we learned about Saturn?

    Astronomy professor Leslie Looney talks about NASA’s Cassini satellite, which will descend into Saturn’s atmosphere tomorrow, twenty years after it's launch 

  • Media advisory: Candlelight vigil Sunday to honor missing scholar Yingying Zhang

    A candlelight vigil to honor missing scholar Yingying Zhang will be held at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 17 at the Illini Union. In the event of rain, the vigil will be held in the Union’s Courtyard Cafe.

  • Campus Recreation to celebrate Ice Arena reopening

    Campus Recreation at Illinois will hold a grand reopening of the newly renovated Ice Arena on Friday, Sept. 15 from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Remarks from Marcus Jackson, the director of Campus Recreation, will be at 7:30 p.m.

  • Deaths

    Jesse A. "Tony" Clements ... Charles Vincent Joseph “Charlie” Craft ... Marvin Lockmiller ... Theresa Rasner-Harris ... Sammy Joseph Rebecca

  • MEDIA ADVISORY: Expert available on post-hurricane recovery efforts

    University of Illinois urban and regional planning professor Robert Olshansky is available for interviews regarding post-disaster recovery in the wake of hurricanes Harvey and Irma.

  • Is our flood insurance model broken?

    Craig Lemoine, the director of the Financial Planning Program at the College of ACES, discusses the flood insurance market in light of Hurricane Harvey losses.

  • Should states be in the lottery business?

    A major downside to record-breaking lottery jackpots is that money flows from poorer communities into the hands of one incredibly lucky person, said Craig Lemoine, the director of the Financial Planning Program at the College of ACES.

  • Vietnam War at 50: What has been the legacy of Agent Orange?

    A historian looks at the Vietnam War herbicide Agent Orange and how it changed ideas about war wounds and the cause of birth defects.

  • Did news coverage turn Americans against the Vietnam War?

    News coverage of the Vietnam War did not have the effect on popular support that many believe, says a University of Illinois researcher.

     

  • U. of I., Kenyan dignitaries introduce exhibition of Swahili arts

    U. of I. Chancellor Robert J. Jones and Krannert Art Museum Director Kathleen Harleman welcomed visitors to “World on the Horizon: Swahili Arts Across the Indian Ocean” on the exhibition’s opening night at the museum Thursday, including Robinson Njeru Githae, the Kenyan ambassador to the United States, and Mzalendo Kibunjia, the director general of the National Museums of Kenya.

    “It is fitting that ‘World on the Horizon’ is organized by Krannert Art Museum, that it begins here but will travel across the country,” Jones said. “This exhibition and its underlying research reflect the vital and important work we do at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and demonstrate how far the impact of our scholarship can reach.”

    Jones and Harleman acknowledged the significance of the exhibition, which includes many works of art from Kenya and Oman that are being exhibited in the U.S. for the first time. “World on the Horizon” will be on view at the museum through March 24 in the East Gallery.

    “We hope this exhibition of Swahili art will begin an era of partnership between Kenya and the United States,” Githae said. “As the exhibition travels to other museums, we invite all to get to know and understand this art and culture.” There are more than 30 works of art from the National Museums of Kenya in the exhibition.

    The exhibition “reflects years of research and tremendous cooperation among institutions, including the National Museums of Kenya and dozens of other museums and private collectors who have lent their work to this endeavor,” said Allyson Purpura, the senior curator and curator of Global African Art at the museum. She and Prita Meier, a professor of art history at New York University, co-curated the exhibition.

    “World on the Horizon” will later travel to the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art in Washington, D.C., and to Fowler Museum at the University of California, Los Angeles. The exhibit enriches understanding of the Swahili coast of Africa by emphasizing its global connections, deepening discourse and advancing knowledge in important ways, Purpura said.

    “It asks visitors to ponder how artistic practice and human creativity can lead people to remap their relationship to seemingly distant places and societies,” she said. “It will encourage visitors to make connections between artworks and to question their own expectations of what African, Asian, Islamic or Western culture looks like.”

    Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion are part of the College of Fine and Applied Arts at Illinois.

  • Center for Advanced Study seeks research project proposals

    The Center for Advanced Study invites U. of I. faculty members to submit scholarly and creative proposals for consideration for its research appointments program.

     

  • Deaths

    Gary Lee Ashby

  • How should universities handle controversial speech?

    The proper way to register dissent with speech one finds offensive doesn’t involve blockades or threatening violence. It’s more speech, says lllinois law dean Vikram Amar

  • Deaths

    Albert E. Bloemker

  • Is affirmative action in college admissions under threat?

    An Illinois expert on affirmative action in higher education talks about the Justice Department’s plans to investigate possible racial discrimination in college and university admissions policies

  • Illinois soils are cooler, drier in mid-August

    Soils across Illinois were cooler and drier than average in the first half of August, said Jennie Atkins, the water and atmospheric resources monitoring program manager at the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

  • University YMCA to hold Dump and Run sale this weekend

    The University YMCA will hold its annual Dump and Run sale Saturday, Aug. 26, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the University of Illinois Stock Pavilion, 1402 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Urbana. Admission is $3. A follow-up sale will occur Sunday, Aug. 27, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the pavilion, with a “free” sale from 2:30 to 3 p.m. Dump and Run is a community recycling program that reduces litter and consumer waste, saves space in landfills, lowers dumping costs for certified housing and apartments, and provides inexpensive items for people to purchase.

  • Deaths

    Jerome “Jerry” Carlson ... Raymond (Ray) Eugene Jenkins ... Janis Elaine “Jan” Shearer ... Karen L. Wold

  • Illinois history professor to speak following Sunday, Aug. 20, screening of ‘Dunkirk’ at Virginia Theatre

    John A. Lynn II, a professor emeritus of history at Illinois, will give a talk and answer questions covering the events depicted in the film “Dunkirk” immediately following the 1 p.m. screening Aug. 20 at the Virginia Theatre, 203 W. Park Ave., Champaign.

     

  • How do employers combat a resurgent white supremacy movement?

    Labor and employment relations professor Michael LeRoy discusses his research about confronting a resurgent white supremacy movement.

  • Bashir named executive associate dean of Carle Illinois College of Medicine

    The Carle Illinois College of Medicine has appointed a permanent executive associate dean: Rashid Bashir, a professor and the department head of bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  • Deaths

    Barbara Ann Albin Brown ... Nancy Doris Chumbley ... Harvey Albert Hermann Jr. ... William “Bill” J. Kubitz ... Donald Eugene Senn 

     

  • July conditions in Illinois ranged from floods to drought

    Northern Illinois experienced heavy rain and widespread flooding in July. Meanwhile, parts of central and southern Illinois experienced dry weather that caused crop damage, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel of the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

    On average, however, the statewide precipitation was 4.81 inches, which is 0.73 inches above normal.