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  • Conspiracy thinking less likely with greater news media literacy, study suggests

    U. of I. journalism professor Stephanie Craft has focused much of her recent work on news media literacy, trying to understand what people know about the news media and how it works, and how that influences attitudes about politics and civic engagement.

    U. of I. journalism professor Stephanie Craft has focused much of her recent work on news media literacy, trying to understand what people know about the news media and how it works, and how that influences attitudes about politics and civic engagement.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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  • Editor’s notes:

    To reach Stephanie Craft, call 217-244-4608; email scraft@illinois.edu.

    The study, “News media literacy and conspiracy theory endorsement,” was published online Oct. 4 by the journal Communication and the Public (access may be restricted). It will appear in the journal’s next print issue, being published in December. The study also is available from Craft or the News Bureau. DOI: 10.1177/2057047317725539

    Craft also addressed the subject of news media literacy in this February 2017 Q&A: Is it possible to be news literate in a ‘fake news’ world?