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  • Snake fungal disease parallels white-nose syndrome in bats

    Graduate student Daniel Raudabaugh, left, and mycologist Andrew Miller, of the Illinois Natural History Survey, conducted the first in-depth study of the basic biology of Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola, the fungus that causes snake fungal disease.

    Graduate student Daniel Raudabaugh, left, and mycologist Andrew Miller, of the Illinois Natural History Survey, conducted the first in-depth study of the basic biology of Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola, the fungus that causes snake fungal disease.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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  • Editor's note: To reach Matthew Allender, call 217-265-0320; email mcallend@illinois.edu.
    To reach Andrew Miller, call 217-244-0439; email amiller7@illinois.edu.
    To reach Daniel Raudabaugh, call 217-244-0493; email raudaba2@illinois.edu.

    The paper, “The natural history, ecology, and epidemiology of Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola and its potential impact on free-ranging snake populations,” is available online or from the U. of I. News Bureau.