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  • Researchers track the secret lives of feral and free-roaming house cats

    The cats were fitted with radio collars and tracked over two years. Some of the collars also had devices that continuously monitored the cats' every move. This un-owned cat was one of those tracked.

    The cats were fitted with radio collars and tracked over two years. Some of the collars also had devices that continuously monitored the cats' every move. This un-owned cat was one of those tracked.

    Photo courtesy Illinois Natural History Survey

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      The cats were fitted with radio collars and tracked over two years. Some of the collars also had devices that continuously monitored the cats' every move. This un-owned cat was one of those tracked.

      Photo courtesy Illinois Natural History Survey

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      Jeff Horn, a former graduate student in the department of natural resources and environmental sciences, and colleagues collaborated on a two-year study of owned and un-owned cats outdoors. Photo by Diana Yates

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      One of the feral cats in the study, a mixed breed male, had a home range of 547 hectares (1,351 acres), the largest range of those tracked (red outline). A pet cat in the study, by contrast, stayed very close to home (yellow dot).

      Image courtesy Jeff Horn

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