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  • For kids with ADHD, regular 'green time' is linked to milder symptoms

    University of Illinois natural resources and environmental sciences professor Frances (Ming) Kuo, left, and crop sciences visiting teaching associate Andrea Faber Taylor found that children with ADHD who routinely spent time outdoors in green settings had milder symptoms than those who regularly played indoors or outdoors in built environments.

    University of Illinois natural resources and environmental sciences professor Frances (Ming) Kuo, left, and crop sciences visiting teaching associate Andrea Faber Taylor found that children with ADHD who routinely spent time outdoors in green settings had milder symptoms than those who regularly played indoors or outdoors in built environments.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      University of Illinois natural resources and environmental sciences professor Frances (Ming) Kuo, left, and crop sciences visiting teaching associate Andrea Faber Taylor found that children with ADHD who routinely spent time outdoors in green settings had milder symptoms than those who regularly played indoors or outdoors in built environments.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      A new study adds to the evidence that time spent in green outdoor settings benefits children with ADHD. Public domain photo, courtesy of LEAF

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      Numerous studies have found that short-term exposures to natural environments improve concentration and impulse control in children and adults immediately afterwards. A new study indicates that even a routinely experienced green space is beneficial to children with ADHD.

      Photo by Andrea Faber Taylor

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