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  • Brain signals link physical fitness to better language skills in children

    University of Illinois kinesiology and community health professor Charles Hillman, right, and graduate student Mark Scudder looked at electrical activity in the brain to help explain why fitness is associated with better language skills in children.

    University of Illinois kinesiology and community health professor Charles Hillman, right, and graduate student Mark Scudder looked at electrical activity in the brain to help explain why fitness is associated with better language skills in children.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      University of Illinois kinesiology and community health professor Charles Hillman, right, and graduate student Mark Scudder looked at electrical activity in the brain to help explain why fitness is associated with better language skills in children.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      The researchers tracked brain activity in participants using electroencephalography, which captures signals from dozens of electrodes on the scalp.

      Photo by Charles Hillman

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  • To reach Charles Hillman, call 217-244-2663; email chhillma@illinois.edu.
    To reach Mark Scudder, email mscudde2@illinois.edu. The paper, “The Association Between Aerobic Fitness and Language Processing in Children: Implications for Academic Achievement,” is available online or from the U. of I. News Bureau.