blog navigation

Business

blog posts

  • U. of I. advertising professor John Wirtz found that sex doesn’t sell in advertising the way many assume it does.

    Research suggests sexual appeals in ads don’t sell brands, products

    Sexy ads stick in the memory more but don’t sell the brand or product, according to research that analyzed nearly 80 advertising studies published over three decades.

  • U. of I. scholars collecting, analyzing constitutions from around world

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Thomas Jefferson believed that a country's constitution should be rewritten every 19 years. Instead, the U.S. Constitution, which Jefferson did not help to write (he was in Paris serving as U.S. minister to France when the Constitutional Convention was held in Philadelphia), has prevailed since 1789.

  • Photo of Yilan Xu, a professor of agricultural and consumer economics at Illinois

    Paper: Homeownership a ‘dream deferred’ for millennial generation

    Millennials face significant hurdles in their quest for homeownership, said Yilan Xu, a professor of agricultural and consumer economics at Illinois and co-author of a new paper examining homeownership trends among those born between 1980-2000.

  • Laws about pregnant women and substance abuse questioned

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - In Wisconsin, an expectant woman can be taken into custody if police believe her abuse of alcohol may harm her unborn child. In South Dakota, pregnant alcohol and drug users can be committed to treatment centers for up to nine months.

  • There is a "highly significant relationship" between law students' math skills and the substance of their legal analysis, according to research from Arden Rowell, a professor of law and the Richard W. and Marie L. Corman Scholar at Illinois.

    Research: Poor math skills affect legal decision-making

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The stereotype of lawyers being bad with numbers may persist, but new research by two University of Illinois legal scholars suggests that law students are surprisingly good at math, although those with low levels of numeracy analyze some legal questions differently.

  • Implementing "surge pricing" during rush hour or taxing the number of miles a vehicle traveled might be better than raising the gas tax, says a policy brief co-written by U. of I. economists Don Fullerton and Julian Reif. Illinois graduate student Kaveh Nafari also contributed to the study.

    Economists: Pros, cons to raising the gas tax in Illinois

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - After the precipitous drop in crude oil prices over the past nine months, some policymakers in Illinois have advocated raising the state's excise tax on gasoline, which has remained unchanged at 19 cents per gallon since 1990.

  • Human trials of cancer drug PAC-1 continue with new investment

    Clinical trials of the anti-cancer agent PAC-1 are continuing to expand, thanks to a $7 million angel investment from an anonymous contributor who originally invested $4 million to help get the compound this far in the drug-approval pipeline.

  • Photo of YoungAh Park, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois.

    Paper: Email incivility has a ripple effect on households

    The negative repercussions of email incivility extend beyond the workplace, and can even negatively affect a domestic partner’s attitude toward their own work, says a new paper from YoungAh Park, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois.

  • Image of professor Mattias Polborn

    Why not have one national primary election for presidential nominees?

    A Minute With...™ Mattias Polborn, professor of economics and political science

  • Graphic of online master’s degree in strategic brand communication, a unique joint program between the College of Business and College of Media at the University of Illinois

    New online master’s degree in strategic brand communication to prepare future brand leaders

    The online master’s degree in strategic brand communication, a unique joint program between the College of Business and College of Media, aims to prepare the strategic leaders of tomorrow in an ever-changing global digital-media environment.

  • Skills gap for U.S. manufacturing workers mostly a myth, paper says

    Despite the outcry from employers over the dearth of job-ready workers, three-quarters of U.S. manufacturing plants show no sign of hiring difficulties for job vacancies, says new research from Andrew Weaver, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois.

  • Photo of Ravi S. Gajendran, a professor of business administration at the University of Illinois.

    Good boss? Bad boss? Study says workers leave both

    Workers leave both good bosses and bad bosses, a finding that companies can use to their strategic advantage, according to research from Ravi S. Gajendran, a professor of business administration at Illinois.

  • With expansion, the sugarcane-to-ethanol industry in Brazil could reduce global carbon dioxide emissions by as much as 5.6 percent, an international team reports.

    Scientists: Expanding Brazilian sugarcane could dent global CO2 emissions

    Vastly expanding sugarcane production in Brazil for conversion to ethanol could reduce current global carbon dioxide emissions by as much as 5.6 percent, researchers report in the journal Nature Climate Change.

  • Expert: Legal sports gambling will have a destabilizing effect on economy, sports

    The decision in Murphy v. NCAA will likely usher in an era of unregulated, readily available sports gambling on smartphones, said John W. Kindt, a professor emeritus of business administration at the University of Illinois and a leading national gambling critic.

  • Industrial and enterprise systems engineering professor Lavanya Marla and collaborators used artificial intelligence to design a customized pricing model for airline customers.

    Artificial intelligence could help air travelers save a bundle

    Researchers are using artificial intelligence to help airlines price ancillary services such as checked bags and seat reservations in a way that is beneficial to customers’ budget and privacy, as well as to the airline industry’s bottom line.

  • Children need to understand the basics of advertising better than they do, says Illinois advertising professor Michelle Nelson. So she led the development of a curriculum and website to teach advertising literacy in school classrooms, incorporating lessons on healthy eating. This example ad developed for the curriculum playfully sells parents on feeding their kids vegetables.

    Beyond the big ads: teaching kids ad literacy and nutrition in grade school classrooms

    The Super Bowl will feature car ads, beer ads, food ads – but probably none for carrots. Most food ads, game time or anytime, are pitching less-healthy fare. Kids are often the target. Do they understand what an ad is? Who made it and why? Advertising professor Michelle Nelson worked with an Illinois school district to develop an advertising literacy curriculum that also promotes healthy eating.

     

  • Photo of Yuqian Xu, a professor of business administration at the Gies College of Business at Illinois.

    Adoption of mobile payment shifts consumer spending patterns, habits

    Paying for goods with a smartphone not only increases the overall transaction amount and frequency of purchases by consumers, it also effectively replaces the actual, physical credit cards in their wallets, said Yuqian Xu, a professor of business administration at the Gies College of Business at Illinois.

  • Parental liability laws misguided and simplistic, legal scholar says

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Durwood Pickle was shocked to find that the Recording Industry Association of America had sued him because his grandchildren had used his computer to illegally download music during visits to his Texas home.

  • Illinois advertising professor Jason Chambers specializes in the history of advertising related to African Americans.

    Why are familiar brands with Black images getting a rethink?

    At least one familiar brand is being retired and others are getting a rethink due to their use of Black images. Illinois advertising professor Jason Chambers explains why.

  • Economist Julian Simon, while a professor at Illinois, devised the notion of rewarding passengers on overbooked flights if they gave up their seats. The seemingly subtle switch provided a $100 billion jolt to the U.S. economy over the last three decades, says former colleague James Heins.

    Airline overbooking policy well known and so, too, should be its creator

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Thirty years ago, U.S. airlines stopped arbitrarily grounding passengers on overbooked flights, instead offering rewards if travelers give up seats to make room for hurried fliers who need to touch down on time.

  • Yunchuan "Frank" Liu, a professor of business administration, says when manufacturers bypass retailers and sell directly to consumers online, product quality can suffer.

    Study: Online retail contributes to decline in product quality

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Consumers may revel in the convenience of online shopping, but the low prices on the Internet are often accompanied by even lower product quality, warns new research co-written by a University of Illinois business professor.

  • Photo of U. of I. labor professor M. Teresa Cardador.

    Increased number of female engineers in managerial roles brings unintended consequences

    Increased female representation in the managerial ranks of engineering organizations may add another layer of sex segregation on top of the one it’s intended to mitigate, says a new paper from U. of I. labor professor M. Teresa Cardador.

  • Photo of Alison Dickson, a senior instructor in the School of Labor and Employment Relations at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

    Paper: Underemployment pervasive for part-time workers in Illinois

    As many as 61% of hourly workers in Illinois are underemployed, underscoring the need for the state to adopt a fair-workweek law, says Alison Dickson, a senior instructor in the School of Labor and Employment Relations at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

  • Yunchuan "Frank" Liu, professor of business administration, says outsourcing tends to soften the competition among industry rivals, resulting in consumers paying artificially higher prices for goods.

    Study: Outsourcing hurts consumers by softening competition among firms

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Firms that outsource aspects of their business to a foreign country may profit by saving money, but the practice tends to soften the competition among industry rivals, exacting a hidden cost on consumers, says new research co-written by a University of Illinois business administration professor.

  • il and environmental engineering professor Tami Bond is part of a team modeling the impact of the freight industry on human health and the eniviroment.

    New model predicts how ground shipping will affect future human health, environment

    The trucks and trains that transport goods across the United States emit gases and particles that threaten human health and the environment. A University of Illinois-led project developed a new model that predicts through 2050 the impact of different environmental policies on human mortality rates and short- and long-term climate change caused by particulate and greenhouse gas emissions.

  • Food displays, food colors affect how much people eat, researcher concludes

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Variety may be the spice of life - and a key contributor to an expanding waistline.

  • The male response to depictions of ideal masculinity in advertising is typically a negative one, which has implications for advertisers and marketers targeting the increasingly fragmented male consumer demographic, according to research co-authored by Cele Otnes, a University of Illinois professor of advertising and of business administration.

    Research: Men respond negatively to depictions of 'ideal masculinity' in ads

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The male response to depictions of ideal masculinity in advertising is typically negative, which has implications for advertisers and marketers targeting the increasingly fragmented consumer demographic, according to research from a University of Illinois marketing expert.

  • Photo of U. of I. psychology professor Dolores Albarracin

    ‘Sleeper effect’ accounts for durability of weak messages from credible sources

    The least convincing arguments can reverberate in the public consciousness over time – provided they’re delivered by a credible source, says new research from U. of I. psychology professor Dolores Albarracin.

  • Cultural sensitivity and a holistic approach to individuals are necessary qualities for executives working abroad, says Anupam Agrawal, a professor of business administration at Illinois.

    Cultural sensitivity necessary for global business leaders, scholar says

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Global business leaders must adapt their behavior to the country in which they are doing business or risk being perceived as ineffective and unable to handle complexity, change and ambiguity, says a paper co-written by a University of Illinois business professor.

  • University of Illinois economics graduate student Juan Sebastian Munoz.

    Paper: School shootings affect school quality, housing value

    Home prices within a school district affected by a school-based mass shooting episode declined by 7.8 percent over the course of at least three years after the incident, according to a new paper co-written by University of Illinois scholar Juan Sebastian Munoz.

  • Photo of Raj Echambadi, the James F. Towey Faculty Fellow at Illinois

    Paper: Strategic trade-offs in automobile design affect market-share value

    Car companies can either “design for satisfaction” by investing in function and ergonomics or “design for delight” by investing in form, says new research from Raj Echambadi, a professor of business administration at Illinois.

  • Professor Craig Gundersen

    Would replacing food stamps with food boxes reduce hunger?

    Swapping food stamps for food boxes would mean scrapping 'the most successful government program we have going today,' said U. of I. professor Craig Gundersen

  • The major shift underway from broadcast and cable to streaming is also bringing targeted advertising to mainstream media, an Illinois professor says.

    Targeted ads are coming to mainstream media. Should we care?

    Targeted advertising is coming to mainstream media, says an Illinois professor of digital media, bringing concerns about equality, division and “total surveillance.”

  • Photo of the Business Instructional Facility on the Urbana campus of the University of Illinois.

    Online master’s degree in accountancy coming to U. of I.’s College of Business

    The new iMSA degree will be for working professionals who want access to quality education from a top-three accounting program with unmatched ties to the accounting field, as well as students new to the accounting profession, said W. Brooke Elliott, the EY Distinguished Professor in Accounting at Illinois.

  • An outright ban on junk-food advertising aimed at children would be more effective than the current industry-led ban, according to research by University of Illinois economist Kathy Baylis.

    Study: Quebec ban on fast-food ads reduced consumption of junk food

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - With mounting concerns over childhood obesity and its associated health risks in the U.S., would a ban on junk-food advertising aimed at children be more effective than the current voluntary, industry-led ban? According to published research from a University of Illinois economist, advertising bans do work, but an outright ban covering the entire U.S. media market would be the most effective policy tool for reducing fast-food consumption in children.

  • Photo collage of labor and employment relations professors YoungAh Park and Yihao Liu, and graduate student Lucille Headrick.

    Control over work-life boundaries creates crucial buffer to manage after-hours work stress

    Workers with greater boundary control over their work and personal lives were better at creating a stress buffer to prevent them from falling into a negative rumination trap, says a new study co-written by a trio of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign experts who study occupational stress and employee well-being.

  • Nonprofit newsrooms are providing a significant new source for news, says University of Illinois journalism professor Brant Houston.

    Are there alternatives to declining, disappearing newspapers?

    As many newspapers decline and disappear – highlighted by two Chicago Tribune reporters recently sounding the alarm about a perceived threat to the Trib – a journalism professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign touts the growth and viability of nonprofits and other alternatives.

  • Professor Michael Leroy

    How do employers combat a resurgent white supremacy movement?

    Labor and employment relations professor Michael LeRoy discusses his research about confronting a resurgent white supremacy movement.

  • An analysis of more than six decades of death rates from U.S. hurricanes by a team of University of Illinois researchers shows that severe hurricanes with a more feminine name result in a greater death toll. From left, Kiju Jung, a doctoral student in marketing in the U. of I.'s College of Business and the lead author on the study, and Madhu Viswanathan and Sharon Shavitt, both professors of marketing at Illinois.

    Study: Hurricanes with female names more deadly than male-named storms

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - In the coming Atlantic hurricane season, watch out for hurricanes with benign-sounding names like Dolly, Fay or Hanna. According to a new article from a team of researchers at the University of Illinois, hurricanes with feminine names are likely to cause significantly more deaths than hurricanes with masculine names, apparently because storms with feminine names are perceived as less threatening.

  • Ill veterans who had radiation exposure now caught in bureaucratic web

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Veterans suffering from cancers linked to exposure to radiation from atomic test explosions encounter a complex and error-ridden process that routinely denies them disability benefits, a University of Illinois scholar says.

  • Photo of U. of I. psychology professor Dolores Albarracin

    Paper: Even after debunking, misinformation and ‘fake news’ persist

    Even in the face of evidence to the contrary, the effects of misinformation persist and can’t be wholly erased, says a new paper co-written by U. of I. psychology professor Dolores Albarracin.

  • Photo of Brenna Ellison, a professor of agriculture and consumer economics at Illinois and an expert in consumer food preferences and behaviors.

    Paper: Nutrition label readers favor food quality over quantity

    Although nutrition-label users eat roughly the same amount of food as less-discerning diners, the two groups diverge when it comes to the quality of the food they eat, says a new paper co-written by Brenna Ellison, a professor of agriculture and consumer economics at Illinois and an expert in consumer food preferences and behaviors.

  • Study: Tradeoffs between commute time, safety

    Urban commuters may be less likely to encounter automobile accidents if they are willing to increase trip time, researchers report. A new study from the University of Illinois introduces a tool that helps quantify the connection between traffic accidents and city road networks.

  • Amanda Ciafone, a professor of media and cinema studies at Illinois, is the author of the book “Counter-Cola.”

    Professor’s history of Coca-Cola also tells larger story of globalization

    Coca-Cola’s history is one of innovation in image-making, outsourcing and other now-common practices of global capitalism – and of adapting to challenges from activists and movements resisting its practices, says an Illinois professor in a new book.

  • Photo of U. of I. business professor and branding expert Carlos J. Torelli

    ‘Cultural distinctiveness’ can influence consumer preferences for certain products, study says

    The concept of “cultural distinctiveness” prompts consumers to fulfill a need to connect with home by favoring brands or products associated with a related cultural group, says U. of I. business professor and branding expert Carlos J. Torelli.

  • Photo of Carlos J. Torelli, U. of I. business professor and branding expert

    What’s in a name? For young Chinese consumers and foreign brands, it’s about culture mixing

    Younger, more cosmopolitan Chinese consumers tend to favor brand translations that keep both the sound and the meaning of the original name, says U. of I. business professor and branding expert Carlos J. Torelli.

  • Photo of Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations at the Urbana campus of the University of Illinois and the director of the Labor Education Program in Chicago.

    Does lack of paid sick time make US susceptible to global health crisis?

    Lack of paid sick time makes the U.S. acutely susceptible to a global health crises like COVID-19, and is part of the larger problem of tying health care to employment, says U. of I. labor expert Robert Bruno.

  • Photo of Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois.

    How will upcoming Supreme Court case, teacher strikes affect organized labor?

    A pending U.S. Supreme Court case could lead to the most significant changes in labor relations since the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947, says Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois.

  • Photo of Richard Benton, a professor of labor and employment relations on the Urbana campus of the University of Illinois.

    Paper: Civic participation can bridge social-class segregation

    Research from U. of I. labor professor Richard Benton says there’s a strong correlation between civic participation and improving the prestige of one’s social network.

  • Pro sports stadiums don't bolster local economies, scholars say

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - If you build it, they will come ... with wallets bulging, eager to exchange greenbacks for peanuts, popcorn, hot dogs and beer, and T-shirts and ball caps with team logos.