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  • Caffeine may offset some health risks of diets high in fat, sugar

    Photo of, from left, nutritional sciences professor Manabu T. Nakamura; Elvira Gonzalez de Mejia, director of the Division of Nutritional Sciences; and animal sciences professor Jan E. Novakofski.

    In a study of rats, University of Illinois scientists found that caffeine limited weight gain and cholesterol production, despite a diet that was high in fat and sugar. Co-authors of the study included, from left, nutritional sciences professor Manabu T. Nakamura; Elvira Gonzalez de Mejia, director of the Division of Nutritional Sciences; and animal sciences professor Jan E. Novakofski.

    Photo by Fred Zwicky

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  • Editor’s notes: To contact Elvira Gonzalez de Mejia, call 217-244-3196; email edemejia@illinois.edu

    The paper “Caffeine, but not other phytochemicals, in mate tea (Ilex paraguariensis St. Hilaire) attenuates high-fat-high-sucrose-diet-driven lipogenesis and body fat accumulation“ is available online or from the News Bureau

    DOI: 10.1016/j.jff.2019.103646