blog navigation

blog posts

  • Study: Kidney stones have distinct geological histories

    Using techniques both common and new to geology and biology, researchers make new discoveries about how kidney stones repeatedly grow and dissolve as they form inside the kidney.

    Using a suite of techniques both common and new to geology and biology, researchers, from left, M.D./Ph.D. student Jessica Saw, geologist and microbiologist Bruce Fouke, microscopy expert and plant biologist Mayandi Sivaguru and their colleagues made new discoveries about how kidney stones repeatedly grow and dissolve as they form inside the kidney.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

    Images

blog posts

  • Editor’s notes:

    To reach Bruce Fouke, call 217-244-5431; email fouke@illinois.edu.  

    To reach Mayandi Sivaguru, email sivaguru@illinois.edu.

    To reach Jessica Saw, email jsaw2@illinois.edu.  

    The paper “Geobiology reveals how human kidney stones dissolve in vivo” is available online and from the U. of I. News Bureau.

    DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-31890-9