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  • Long-term estrogen therapy changes microbial activity in the gut, study finds

    Estrogen supplements change the bacterial composition in the intestinal tract, affecting how estrogen is metabolized, according to a new study in mice by researchers at the U. of I. From left (front row): postdoctoral research associate Xiaoji (Christine) Liu; Colleen Bushell, National Center for Supercomputing Applications senior research scientist; food science and human nutrition professor Zeynep Madak-Erdogan; epidemiology professor Becca Smith. Back row, from left: Michael Welge, NSCA senior data analytics advisor; microbiology professor Michael Miller; and chemistry professor John Katzenellenbogen.

    Estrogen supplements change the bacterial composition in the intestinal tract, affecting how estrogen is metabolized, according to a new study in mice by researchers at the U. of I. From left (front row): postdoctoral research associate Xiaoji (Christine) Liu; Colleen Bushell, National Center for Supercomputing Applications senior research scientist; food science and human nutrition professor Zeynep Madak-Erdogan; epidemiology professor Becca Smith. Back row, from left: Michael Welge, NSCA senior data analytics advisor; microbiology professor Michael Miller; and chemistry professor John Katzenellenbogen.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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  • Editor’s notes: To reach Zeynep Madak-Erdogan, call 217-300-9063; email  zmadake2@illinois.edu

    The study “Long-term administration of conjugated estrogen and bazedoxifene decreased murine fecal B-glucuronidase activity without impacting overall microbiome community” is available online or from the News Bureau