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  • Research: Bankruptcy judges influenced by apologies

    Debtors who apologized were seen as more remorseful and were expected to manage their finances more carefully in the future compared to debtors who did not offer an apology, according to a study co-written by U. of I. law professors Jennifer K. Robbennolt (left) and Robert M. Lawless.

    Debtors who apologized were seen as more remorseful and were expected to manage their finances more carefully in the future compared to debtors who did not offer an apology, according to a study co-written by U. of I. law professors Jennifer K. Robbennolt (left) and Robert M. Lawless.

    Photo courtesy College of Law

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  • Editor's note: To contact Jennifer K. Robbennolt, call 217-333-6623; email jrobbenn@illinois.edu.                       To contact Robert M. Lawless, call 217-244-6714; email rlawless@illinois.edu.                       The article, “Bankrupt Apologies,” is available online.