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  • What can be done about coercive control in abusive relationships?

    image of professor jennifer hardesty

    Human Development and Family Studies Professor Jennifer Hardesty says coercive controlling violence occurs within the context of a larger relationship-wide motive of one partner to control the daily activities and autonomy of the victim, and it’s associated with more frequent and severe physical violence. 

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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  • To contact Jennifer Hardesty, call 217-333-0725; e-mail hardesty@illinois.edu

                            The study “Toward a Standard Approach to Operationalizing Coercive Control and Classifying Violence Types,” published in the August issue of the Journal of Marriage and Family, is available online from Wiley Library or from the News Bureau.

                            The study “He Could Scare Me Without Laying a Hand on Me: Mothers’ Experiences of Nonviolent Coercive Control During Marriage and After Separation,” accepted for publication in the journal Violence Against Women, is available online or from the News Bureau.