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  • Review finds little evidence that brain-training games yield real-world benefits

    Psychology professor Daniel Simons, left, educational psychology professor Elizabeth Stine-Morrow, right, and their colleagues conducted a comprehensive review of studies cited by proponents of brain-training products. The researchers found “no compelling evidence” that brain-training games provide cognitive benefits that are relevant to daily life.

    Psychology professor Daniel Simons, left, educational psychology professor Elizabeth Stine-Morrow, right, and their colleagues conducted a comprehensive review of studies cited by proponents of brain-training products. The researchers found “no compelling evidence” that brain-training games provide cognitive benefits that are relevant to daily life.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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  • Editor’s notes:
    To reach Dan Simons, call 217-689-1527; email dsimons@illinois.edu.
    To reach Elizabeth Stine-Morrow, call 217-244-2167; email eals@illinois.edu.

    The paper “Do ‘Brain-Training’ Programs Work?” is available online and from the U. of I. News Bureau.
    DOI: 10.1177/152910061661983