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  • Scientists identify genes that disrupt response to breast cancer treatment

    In breakthrough research on breast cancer, a team at the University of Illinois discovered that higher levels of the nuclear transport gene XPO1 indicate when a patient is likely to be resistant to the popular drug tamoxifen. The team, from left, food science and human nutrition professor Zeynep Madak-Erdogan; graduate students Karen Chen, Kinga Wrobel and Eylem Kulkoyluoglu; and epidemiology professor Rebecca Smith.

    In breakthrough research on breast cancer, a team at the University of Illinois discovered that higher levels of the nuclear transport gene XPO1 indicate when a patient is likely to be resistant to the popular drug tamoxifen. The team, from left, food science and human nutrition professor Zeynep Madak-Erdogan, graduate student Karen Chen, research assistant Kinga Wrobel, graduate student Eylem Kulkoyluoglu, and epidemiology professor Rebecca Smith.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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  • Editor’s notes: To reach Zeynep Madak-Erdogan, call 217-300-9063; email  zmadake2@illinois.edu

    The study “Era-XPO1 crosstalk controls tamoxifen sensitivity in tumors by altering ERK5 cellular localization” is available online from the journal Molecular Endocrinology or from the News Bureau