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  • Powerful drug's surprising, simple method could lead to better treatments

    Illinois chemists discovered that a powerful treatment for fungal infections doesn't work the way doctors have assumed, setting a new course for drug development. The researchers, led by chemistry professor Martin Burke, right, are, from left, graduate students Ian Dailey, Matthew Endo, Brandon Wilcock, Brice Uno and, not pictured, Kaitlyn Gray and Daniel Palacios.

    Illinois chemists discovered that a powerful treatment for fungal infections doesn't work the way doctors have assumed, setting a new course for drug development. The researchers, led by chemistry professor Martin Burke, right, are, from left, graduate students Ian Dailey, Matthew Endo, Brandon Wilcock, Brice Uno and, not pictured, Kaitlyn Gray and Daniel Palacios.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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  • Editor's note: To contact Martin Burke, call (217)244-8726; email burke@scs.illinois.edu.
    The paper, “Amphotericin Primarily Kills Yeast by Simply Binding Ergosterol,” is available from theNews Bureau or PNAS.