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Physical Sciences

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  • Water theory is watertight, researchers say

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - There may be tiny bubbles in the wine, but not at the interface between water and a waxy coating on glass, a new study shows.

  • Super small nanoelectrodes can probe microscale environments

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Investigating the composition and behavior of microscale environments, including those within living cells, could become easier and more precise with nanoelectrodes being developed at the University of Illinois.

  • Guest lecturer to speak on the physics of superheroes

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - James Kakalios, a professor of physics at the University of Minnesota, will discuss physics and comic-book superheroes during a talk Thursday (March 15) at the University of Illinois.

  • State finals of Illinois Science Olympiad to be held April 7

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. The state finals of the Illinois Science Olympiad will be held April 7 at the University of Illinois. The event, which begins at 9 a.m., is part of a national competition in which middle and high school students compete in 24 events involving science concepts and engineering skills. The public is invited to attend.

  • Examination of radiation left from birth of universe could alter theories

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Using relic radiation from the birth of the universe, astrophysicists at the University of Illinois have proposed a new way of measuring the fine-structure constant in the past, and comparing it with today.

  • Measurement technique can image how heat moves through material

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Infrared cameras create images by detecting the heat given off by an object, including the body of a soldier hidden in the dark of night. Now, researchers have developed a technique for imaging how fast heat can move through an object.

  • U. of I. to host state finals of Science Olympiad April 21

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The state finals of the Illinois Science Olympiad will be held April 21 at the University of Illinois. The event, which begins at 8 a.m., is part of a national competition in which middle and high school students compete in 23 events involving science concepts and engineering skills. The public is invited to attend.

  • Scientists say new computer model amounts to a lot more than a hill of beans

    Champaign researchers who have developed a new computer model that can help plant scientists breed better soybean crops.

  • Physics professor wins Guggenheim Fellowship

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Dale J. Van Harlingen, a professor of physics at the University of Illinois and a researcher at the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, has won a 2001 Guggenheim Fellowship.

  • Sullivan receives Leo Szilard Lectureship Award from American Physical Society

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Jeremiah D. Sullivan, a professor of physics at the University of Illinois and former director of the UI's Program in Arms Control, Disarmament and International Security, has been selected as the 2000 recipient of the Leo Szilard Lectureship Award from the American Physical Society.

  • Illinois scholar elected fellow of American Academy of Arts and Sciences

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - James Economy, a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

  • Two Illinois researchers to receive Presidential Early Career Awards

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Two University of Illinois researchers are among 58 young researchers named today (June 13) as recipients of the 2004 Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on young professionals at the outset of their independent research careers. They will receive their awards today in a White House ceremony.

  • Illinois professor to receive award from Materials Research Society

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Nick Holonyak Jr., a John Bardeen Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been selected as the 2004 recipient of the Von Hippel Award from the Materials Research Society. The award will be presented Dec. 1 at the MRS meeting in Boston.

  • Climate scientist to deliver lecture in series honoring his father

    CHAMPAIGN,Ill. - Ralph Keeling, a climate scientist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, will deliver the annual lecture that honors his father, the late Charles David Keeling, who was an analytical chemist at the University of Illinois and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

  • Self-assembly generates more versatile scaffolds for crystal growth

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Self-organizing synthetic molecules originally used for gene therapy may have applications as templates and scaffolds for the production of inorganic materials. Using electrostatic interactions between oppositely charged molecules as the binding force, scientists are learning how to organize these synthetic molecules into more versatile complexes with large and controllable pore sizes.

  • Space telescope astrophysicist to present public talk

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Mario Livio, a senior astrophysicist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, will discuss the wonders of the universe observed by the Hubble Space Telescope during a talk Sept. 17 at the University of Illinois.

  • Distinguished NASA scientist to present public talk

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - David Morrison, a senior scientist at the NASA Astrobiology Institute, will present the sixth talk in the department of astronomy's Icko Iben Jr. Distinguished Lectureship at 4 p.m. Nov. 5 in Foellinger Auditorium, 709 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana. The talk, "Cosmic Collisions: How Astronomers are Saving the World," is free and open to the public.

  • Home computers to help researchers better understand universe

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Want to help unravel the mysteries of the universe? A new distributed computing project designed by a University of Illinois researcher allows people around the world to participate in cutting-edge cosmology research by donating their unused computing cycles.

  • Researchers solve one mystery of high-temperature superconductors

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - An experimental mystery - the origin of the insulating state in a class of materials known as doped Mott insulators - has been solved by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The solution helps explain the bizarre behavior of doped Mott insulators, such as high-temperature copper-oxide superconductors.

  • Goal of project is development of petroleum-free fuel

    Developing a petroleum-free fuel from corn byproducts is one of the goals of a newly funded research project at the UI. Eight research laboratories will pool their expertise, attacking the problems from different directions in order to work to improve the efficiency of bioconversion of plant fibers into fuels and other value-added products.

  • Portable sampling cart monitors emissions from wood-burning cookstoves

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - A new method of measuring emissions from cookstoves could help improve human health and enhance the accuracy of global climate models.

  • Are there still holes in aviation security, ten years after 9/11?

    A Minute With™... computer science professor Sheldon H. Jacobson

     

  • Novel computed imaging technique uses blurry images to enhance view

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a novel computational image-forming technique for optical microscopy that can produce crisp, three-dimensional images from blurry, out-of-focus data.

  • New algorithm speeds simulations of complex fluids

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Computer simulations play an essential role in the study of complex fluids - liquids that contain particles of different sizes. Such liquids have numerous applications, which depend on a fundamental understanding of their behavior. But the two main techniques for the atomistic simulation of liquids - the molecular dynamics technique and the Monte Carlo method - have limitations that greatly reduce their effectiveness.

  • Puzzling height of polar clouds linked to solar radiation

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Scientists have discovered why polar mesospheric clouds over the South Pole are nearly two miles higher than those over the North Pole. A variation in solar radiation - a result of Earth's elliptical orbit - is responsible, they say.

  • Two elected to membership in National Academy of Engineering

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - University of Illinois Vice Chancellor for Research Charles F. Zukoski and electrical and computer engineering professor P.R. Kumar have been elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering, the academy announced today.

  • Illinois professor receives astronomy education prize

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - James B. Kaler, a professor emeritus of astronomy at the University of Illinois, has been awarded the American Astronomical Society 2008 Education Prize. The prize recognizes Kaler for his outstanding contributions to the education of the public, students and the next generation of professional astronomers.

  • U. of I. signs commitment to combat climate degradation

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The University of Illinois has promised to achieve climate neutrality by joining a nationwide consortium of concerned colleges and universities that are signing the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment. By signing the commitment, Chancellor Richard Herman pledged that the U. of I. is developing a long-range plan for reducing and neutralizing greenhouse gas emissions on campus and is accelerating its research and educational efforts to equip society to re-stabilize Earth's climate and help the U.S. achieve energy independence.

  • Goddard honored with new AAAS Early Career Award

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science has recognized Lynford L. Goddard as the first recipient of the newly established AAAS Early Career Award for Public Engagement with Science. The award recognizes the achievements of individual early-career scientists and engineers who have demonstrated significant contributions to public engagement activities while simultaneously pursuing a research career.

  • CARMA groundbreaking set for March 27

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Astronomers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will be major participants in the construction and operation of a new millimeter-wave telescope array to be located in the high desert of California. Groundbreaking for the facility - called the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy - is set for 2 p.m. on Saturday (March 27) at Cedar Flat in the Inyo Mountains near Bishop.

  • Improved dielectric developed for chip-level copper circuitry

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - A new dielectric material, developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, could facilitate the use of copper circuitry at the chip level. The thermally stable aromatic polymer has a low dielectric constant of 1.85, good mechanical properties and excellent adhesion.

  • Weather forecasts may be predictors for prevalence of West Nile virus

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Weather forecasts could become barometers for predicting the potential threat of West Nile virus to humans and wildlife, according to scientists at two state agencies based at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  • Engineering professor named Carnegie Scholar

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Michael Loui, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been named a Carnegie Scholar by the Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

  • State finals of Science Olympiad to be held April 29 on campus

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The state finals of the Illinois Science Olympiad will be held April 29 at the University of Illinois. The event, which begins at 9 a.m., is part of a national competition in which middle and high school students compete in 24 events involving science concepts and engineering skills. The public is invited to attend.

  • Physics professor named to NATO Science Committee

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Jeremiah D. Sullivan, professor and head of physics at the University of Illinois, has been appointed to the Advisory Panel of the Security-Related Civil Science and Technology Sub-Program by the NATO Science Committee. The appointment, which begins in September, is for four years.

  • Illinois professor to receive $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Nick Holonyak Jr., a John Bardeen Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been selected as the 2004 recipient of the $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize - the world's largest single cash prize for invention.

  • Illinois professor to receive global energy prize

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Nick Holonyak Jr., a John Bardeen Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been selected as a 2003 recipient of the Global Energy Prize from Russia. He shares the $900,000 prize with Gennady Mesiats of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Yan Douglas Smith of Titan Pulse Sciences Division.

  • U. of I. scholars elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Frederick K. Lamb and Ralph G. Nuzzo, professors at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, have been elected fellows of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

  • In new statistical approach, data decide model

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - A data-driven computational approach developed by a University of Illinois statistician is revealing secrets about inner Earth and discovering unique gene expressions in fruit flies, zebra fish and other living organisms.

  • Illinois chemist receives Humboldt Research Award

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - University of Illinois chemistry professor James Lisy has been chosen to receive a prestigious Humboldt Research Award honoring a lifetime of research achievements.

  • Head of National Academy of Sciences to kick off memorial lecture series

    CHAMPAIGN,Ill. - Ralph Cicerone, the president of the National Academy of Sciences, will give the inaugural lecture Monday (Sept. 13) in a series honoring the late Charles David Keeling, an analytical chemist who measured atmospheric carbon dioxide with great precision.

  • Scientists decipher mechanism behind antimicrobial 'hole punchers'

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - In the battle against bacteria, researchers have scored a direct hit. They have made a discovery that could shorten the road to new and more potent antibiotics.

  • Founder Professor wins physics prize

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Steve Granick, Founder Professor of Engineering, and professor of materials science and engineering, of chemistry, of chemical and biomolecular engineering, and of physics, was awarded the Polymer Physics Prize of the American Physical Society.

  • Illinois professor named 2002 Packard Fellow

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Neil L. Kelleher, a professor of chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is among 20 U.S. researchers named 2002 Packard Fellows in natural sciences by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

  • Carbon sequestration policy must balance private property, public good

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The lack of a settled legal framework that balances private property rights while maximizing the public good ultimately hinders the large-scale commercial deployment of geologic carbon sequestration, according to published research by a University of Illinois expert in renewable energy law.

  • New surface chemistry may extend life of technology for making transistors

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a technique that uses surface chemistry to make tinier and more effective p-n junctions in silicon-based semiconductors. The method could permit the semiconductor industry to significantly extend the life of current ion-implantation technology for making transistors, thereby avoiding the implementation of difficult and costly alternatives.

  • Microbial transport at Yellowstone: by land, sea or air?

  • New instrumentation helps scientists better predict space weather

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - New instrumentation and observing techniques, being developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, are helping scientists better understand and predict space weather.

  • Holonyak to receive institute's highest honor

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Nick Holonyak Jr., a John Bardeen Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has been selected as the 2003 recipient of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Medal of Honor.

  • 'First-look' results with spectro-radiometer: All systems 'Go'