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Physical Sciences

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  • High-fidelity patterns form spontaneously when solvent evaporates

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Resembling neatly stacked rows of driftwood abandoned by receding tides, particles left by a confined, evaporating droplet can create beautiful and complex patterns. The natural, pattern-forming process could find use in fields such as nanotechnology and optoelectronics.

  • Physics professor named to NATO Science Committee

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Jeremiah D. Sullivan, professor and head of physics at the University of Illinois, has been appointed to the Advisory Panel of the Security-Related Civil Science and Technology Sub-Program by the NATO Science Committee. The appointment, which begins in September, is for four years.

  • Physics professor wins Guggenheim Fellowship

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Dale J. Van Harlingen, a professor of physics at the University of Illinois and a researcher at the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, has won a 2001 Guggenheim Fellowship.

  • Space telescope astrophysicist to present public talk

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Mario Livio, a senior astrophysicist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, will discuss the wonders of the universe observed by the Hubble Space Telescope during a talk Sept. 17 at the University of Illinois.

  • Puzzling height of polar clouds linked to solar radiation

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Scientists have discovered why polar mesospheric clouds over the South Pole are nearly two miles higher than those over the North Pole. A variation in solar radiation - a result of Earth's elliptical orbit - is responsible, they say.

  • Super small nanoelectrodes can probe microscale environments

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Investigating the composition and behavior of microscale environments, including those within living cells, could become easier and more precise with nanoelectrodes being developed at the University of Illinois.

  • State finals of Illinois Science Olympiad to be held April 7

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. The state finals of the Illinois Science Olympiad will be held April 7 at the University of Illinois. The event, which begins at 9 a.m., is part of a national competition in which middle and high school students compete in 24 events involving science concepts and engineering skills. The public is invited to attend.

  • Weather forecasts may be predictors for prevalence of West Nile virus

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Weather forecasts could become barometers for predicting the potential threat of West Nile virus to humans and wildlife, according to scientists at two state agencies based at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  • Measurement technique can image how heat moves through material

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Infrared cameras create images by detecting the heat given off by an object, including the body of a soldier hidden in the dark of night. Now, researchers have developed a technique for imaging how fast heat can move through an object.

  • Sullivan receives Leo Szilard Lectureship Award from American Physical Society

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Jeremiah D. Sullivan, a professor of physics at the University of Illinois and former director of the UI's Program in Arms Control, Disarmament and International Security, has been selected as the 2000 recipient of the Leo Szilard Lectureship Award from the American Physical Society.

  • Two Illinois researchers to receive Presidential Early Career Awards

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Two University of Illinois researchers are among 58 young researchers named today (June 13) as recipients of the 2004 Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on young professionals at the outset of their independent research careers. They will receive their awards today in a White House ceremony.

  • Self-assembly generates more versatile scaffolds for crystal growth

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Self-organizing synthetic molecules originally used for gene therapy may have applications as templates and scaffolds for the production of inorganic materials. Using electrostatic interactions between oppositely charged molecules as the binding force, scientists are learning how to organize these synthetic molecules into more versatile complexes with large and controllable pore sizes.

  • Microbial transport at Yellowstone: by land, sea or air?

  • Portable sampling cart monitors emissions from wood-burning cookstoves

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - A new method of measuring emissions from cookstoves could help improve human health and enhance the accuracy of global climate models.

  • 'First-look' results with spectro-radiometer: All systems 'Go'

  • Novel computed imaging technique uses blurry images to enhance view

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a novel computational image-forming technique for optical microscopy that can produce crisp, three-dimensional images from blurry, out-of-focus data.

  • Guest lecturer to speak on the physics of superheroes

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - James Kakalios, a professor of physics at the University of Minnesota, will discuss physics and comic-book superheroes during a talk Thursday (March 15) at the University of Illinois.

  • Improved dielectric developed for chip-level copper circuitry

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - A new dielectric material, developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, could facilitate the use of copper circuitry at the chip level. The thermally stable aromatic polymer has a low dielectric constant of 1.85, good mechanical properties and excellent adhesion.

  • Engineering professor named Carnegie Scholar

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Michael Loui, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been named a Carnegie Scholar by the Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

  • Illinois scholar elected fellow of American Academy of Arts and Sciences

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - James Economy, a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

  • Superconducting nanowires show ability to measure magnetic fields

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - By using DNA molecules as scaffolds, scientists have created superconducting nanodevices that demonstrate a new type of quantum interference and could be used to measure magnetic fields and map regions of superconductivity.

  • Professor receives Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers at White House

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Charles F. Gammie, a professor of physics and of astronomy at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, was among 60 young researchers named as recipients of the 2001 Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the government on young professionals at the outset of their independent research careers. Gammie received his award July 12 in a White House ceremony.

  • National Science Foundation funds new nanoscale research center at Illinois

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has received a grant from the National Science Foundation to create a nanoscale science and engineering center with an emphasis on nanomanufacturing. The grant will provide $12.5 million in funding over five years, with the possibility of a five-year renewal.

  • Huang elected to Chinese Academy of Engineering

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Thomas S. Huang, the William L. Everitt Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been elected a Foreign Member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering.

  • Water theory is watertight, researchers say

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - There may be tiny bubbles in the wine, but not at the interface between water and a waxy coating on glass, a new study shows.

  • Amtrak official to speak on future of high-speed rail initiative

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Michael Franke, assistant vice president and program director of AmtrakÕs Midwest Regional Rail Initiative, will discuss the initiative at a talk at noon Feb. 8 in Room 3269 of the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, 405 N. Mathews Ave., Urbana.

  • Hidden structure revealed in characteristics of transistor laser

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The transistor laser, invented by scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been full of surprises. Researchers recently coaxed the device to reveal fundamental properties of the transistor, and of the transistor laser, moving it a step closer to commercialization.

  • U. of I. to host state finals of Science Olympiad April 21

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The state finals of the Illinois Science Olympiad will be held April 21 at the University of Illinois. The event, which begins at 8 a.m., is part of a national competition in which middle and high school students compete in 23 events involving science concepts and engineering skills. The public is invited to attend.

  • Three Illinois professors elected to National Academy of Sciences

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Three University of Illinois faculty members are among the 72 scientists elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences in recognition of distinguished research and continuing achievements, the academy announced today.

  • Scholars develop protocol for 'LBS,' new wireless Internet technology

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - To some, the ability to track the movements of family members using cell phones equates to a violation of privacy. Others - particularly parents, who already are tapping the new technology to keep tabs on their kids - view it as a convenient way to ensure their children's safety in an increasingly ominous world.

  • Boppart named one of the world's top young innovators by Technology Review

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Stephen A. Boppart, a professor of electrical and computer engineering and of bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been chosen as one of the world's 100 Top Young Innovators by Technology Review, the world's oldest technology magazine.

  • Illinois chemist receives Humboldt Research Award

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - University of Illinois chemistry professor James Lisy has been chosen to receive a prestigious Humboldt Research Award honoring a lifetime of research achievements.

  • Nation remains vulnerable to power blackouts, thanks to political impasse

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - As the peak electricity season approaches, little has been done in Washington to prevent a recurrence of last August's power failure that produced a huge blackout in the Northeast, an expert at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign says.

  • Scientist honored by French university for research on Earth's mantle

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Jay D. Bass, a professor of geology and of materials science at the University of Illinois, has been awarded an honorary doctorate by the University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 in France.

  • Illinois professor wins Packard Fellowship

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Scott K. Silverman, a professor of chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is among 16 U.S. researchers named 2003 Packard Fellows in natural sciences by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. He will receive $625,000 during the next five years to enhance his research efforts.

  • Five Illinois professors elected as 2003 AAAS Fellows

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Five University of Illinois researchers - Ilesanmi Adesida, Craig M. Bethke, Keh-Yung (Norman) Cheng, Jeffrey S. Moore and Robert J. Novak - are among 348 scientists elected as 2003 fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  • Researchers solve one mystery of high-temperature superconductors

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - An experimental mystery - the origin of the insulating state in a class of materials known as doped Mott insulators - has been solved by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The solution helps explain the bizarre behavior of doped Mott insulators, such as high-temperature copper-oxide superconductors.

  • 'The Core' to be featured at first Earth Fear Film Festival

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Inspired by the success of the 24-year-old Insect Fear Film Festival at the University of Illinois, the U. of I. Geology Club and the department of geology are sponsoring an Earth Fear Film Festival on April 13 (Friday).

  • Measurement clarifies role between protein structure and cell adhesion

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Scientists studying the adhesive properties of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) - a protein that helps bind the nervous system together - have found that two opposing models of cell adhesion are both correct.

  • Three Illinois researchers receive Presidential Early Career Awards

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Three researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign were among 56 young researchers named as recipients of the 2005 Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on young professionals at the outset of their independent research careers.

  • Climate scientist to deliver lecture in series honoring his father

    CHAMPAIGN,Ill. - Ralph Keeling, a climate scientist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, will deliver the annual lecture that honors his father, the late Charles David Keeling, who was an analytical chemist at the University of Illinois and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

  • Low-cost climate-change insurance could help ensure better future

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Doing a little now to mitigate long-term climate change would cost much less than doing nothing and making an adjustment in the future, say scientists whose paper appears in the Oct. 15 issue of the journal Science.

  • The lack of a settled legal framework that balances private property rights while maximizing the public good ultimately hinders the large-scale commercial deployment of geologic carbon sequestration, according to research by A. Bryan Endres, a professor of agricultural law at Illinois.  Click photo to enlarge

    Carbon sequestration policy must balance private property, public good

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The lack of a settled legal framework that balances private property rights while maximizing the public good ultimately hinders the large-scale commercial deployment of geologic carbon sequestration, according to published research by a University of Illinois expert in renewable energy law.

  • Super-star clusters may be born small and grow by coalescing

  • Scientists identify molecular cause for one form of deafness

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Scientists exploring the physics of hearing have found an underlying molecular cause for one form of deafness, and a conceptual connection between deafness and the organization of liquid crystals, which are used in flat-panel displays.

  • Two elected to membership in National Academy of Engineering

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Incoming University of Illinois Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Linda P.B. Katehi and College of Engineering Interim Dean Ilesanmi Adesida have been elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering, the academy announced today.

  • Three professors named fellows of American Association for the Advancement of Science

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Three University of Illinois researchers - Robert M. Fossum, Hugh M. Robertson and Peter G. Wolynes - are among 283 scientists who will be recognized Feb. 19 (Saturday) as new fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science during the association's annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

  • Two University of Illinois faculty members earn 2010 Sloan Fellowships

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Two University of Illinois faculty members have been selected to receive 2010 Sloan Research Fellowships from the Alfred P. Sloan foundation: Yann R. Chemla, a professor of physics, and Karrie Karahalios, a professor of computer science.

  • U. of I. signs commitment to combat climate degradation

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The University of Illinois has promised to achieve climate neutrality by joining a nationwide consortium of concerned colleges and universities that are signing the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment. By signing the commitment, Chancellor Richard Herman pledged that the U. of I. is developing a long-range plan for reducing and neutralizing greenhouse gas emissions on campus and is accelerating its research and educational efforts to equip society to re-stabilize Earth's climate and help the U.S. achieve energy independence.

  • Illinois professor to receive $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Nick Holonyak Jr., a John Bardeen Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been selected as the 2004 recipient of the $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize - the world's largest single cash prize for invention.