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  • Ujjal Kumar Mukherjee, a professor of business administration at the Gies College of Business at Illinois who studies innovation in health care.

    Paper: Timely preventative efforts better than mitigation during early stages of outbreak

    Epidemics such as COVID-19 are characterized by resource constraints due to sudden and unprecedented demand shocks for health care facilities and services, making the initial prevention of disease spread through testing, identification and quarantine activities more important than mitigation or curative efforts, according to research co-written by Ujjal Kumar Mukherjee, a professor of business administration at the Gies College of Business at Illinois who studies innovation in health care.

  • Photo of Ravi Mehta, a professor of business administration at Illinois.

    Scarcity, not abundance, enhances consumer creativity, study says

    Resource scarcity translates into enhanced consumer creativity, according to new research co-written by business professor Ravi Mehta.

  • Photo of Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations at the Urbana campus of the University of Illinois and the director of the Labor Education Program in Chicago.

    Will legalizing marijuana be a boon to the state of Illinois?

    By legalizing and taxing recreational marijuana, the state of Illinois could fund additional pension payments while making investments in public education, construction projects, and drug treatment and prevention programs, says Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations at the Urbana campus of the University of Illinois and the director of the Labor Education Program in Chicago.

  • The claim that Chicago public school teachers arent working enough hours during the school day are unwarranted at best and intellectually dishonest at worst, according to research from University of Illinois labor expert Robert Bruno.

    Research: Chicago public school teachers log long hours

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — The claim that Chicago public school teachers aren’t working enough hours during the school day is unwarranted at best and intellectually dishonest at worst, according to research from a University of Illinois labor expert.

  • Photo of Walter W. McMahon, an emeritus professor of economics and of educational organization and leadership at the University of Illinois.

    Spending on public higher education overlooks net benefits as investment in state’s future

    Thinking of higher education funding as an investment that lowers costs – and not as mere consumption spending – could reframe the debate in Springfield, according to research from Walter W. McMahon, an emeritus professor of economics and of educational organization and leadership at the University of Illinois.

  • Paper: Fostering gratitude reduces materialism, increases generosity in adolescents

    Reflecting on what one is grateful for not only tends to lower materialism, but also increases one’s generosity, says new research co-written by Gies College of Business professor Aric Rindfleisch.

  • Photo of University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign labor economist Eliza Forsythe.

    Rise in labor earnings inequality during pandemic reversed by stimulus, unemployment checks

    Job losses during the pandemic were substantially worse for workers in low-paying jobs, leading to a dramatic increase in wage inequality during the early months of the COVID-19 recession, according to new research co-written by University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign labor economist Eliza Forsythe.

  • Photo of Eunmi Mun, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois.

    Merit-based employment practices contribute to gender pay gap, study says

    Meritocratic employment practices such as performance bonuses often fail to reduce gender-based pay inequality and may actually exacerbate it by allowing the status quo to remain intact at firms, says new research co-written by Eunmi Mun, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois.

  • Law professor Richard L. Kaplan says financial advisers are largely overselling the potential benefits of new rules that take effect Jan. 1, eliminating an earnings threshold that has kept many people from shifting into a Roth.

    Roth IRA conversion not a good fit for all, tax expert says

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Starting next year, anyone can convert retirement savings into tax-advantaged Roth individual retirement accounts, but the much-touted switch isn't for everyone, a University of Illinois expert on tax and elder law warns.

  • Photo of Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations at the Urbana campus of the University of Illinois and the director of the Labor Education Program in Chicago.

    Should government do more for the working poor during pandemic?

    Another round of federal stimulus checks and increased unemployment benefits would be “economic stabilizers” for the working poor during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, says U. of I. labor expert Robert Bruno.

  • Photo collage of finance professor David Molitor; recreation, sport and tourism professor Laura Payne; and finance professor Julian Reif.

    Study: Benefits of workplace wellness programs underwhelming

    An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign studied the efficacy of workplace wellness programs and found only a modest impact on employee health, health beliefs and medical utilization.

  • Photo of Dolores Albarracin, a professor of psychology and marketing at Illinois and the director of the Social Action Lab.

    Paper: Mundane behavioral decisions, actions can be ‘misremembered’ as done

    Mundane behaviors such as taking a daily medication can eventually create false memories of completing the task, said Dolores Albarracin, a professor of psychology and marketing at Illinois and the director of the Social Action Lab.

  • Photo of Richard L. Kaplan, the Peer and Sarah Pedersen Professor of Law at Illinois.

    ‘Cadillac tax’ may precipitate wholesale changes to employer-provided health care insurance

    Even if the Affordable Care Act is ultimately repealed, the law’s so-called “Cadillac tax” on high-cost health care plans has already affected employers’ health insurance offerings, says Richard L. Kaplan, the Peer and Sarah Pedersen Professor of Law at Illinois.

  • A new paper co-written by business professors Ujjal Kumar Mukherjee and Sridhar Seshadri shows that rapid bulk-testing for COVID-19 along with other standard mitigation measures such as mask-wearing and social distancing were the keys to successfully reopening college campuses during the pandemic.

    Study: Rapid bulk-testing for COVID-19 key to reopening universities

    A new paper co-written by business professors Ujjal Kumar Mukherjee and Sridhar Seshadri shows that rapid bulk-testing for COVID-19 along with other standard mitigation measures such as mask-wearing and social distancing were the keys to successfully reopening college campuses during the pandemic.

  • Yunchuan "Frank" Liu, a professor of business administration, says a retailer's optimal store layout is driven by an incentive to balance the shopping process of uncertain consumers and the pricing behavior of upstream suppliers.

    Study: Store layout an important variable for retailers

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - A retailer's optimal store layout is the result of balancing the interests of two different types of markets - consumers and suppliers, says new research co-written by a University of Illinois business professor.

  • Photo of University of Illinois anthropology professor Andrew Orta

    New book casts anthropologist’s eye on culture of MBA degree, global capitalism

    A new book by University of Illinois professor Andrew Orta studies the culture of contemporary business education and the MBA degree through the lens of a professional anthropologist.

  • Dual-earner families, gender roles, and the economic recession

    A Minute With™... Amit Kramer, a professor of labor and employment relations

  • Photo of John W. Kindt, a professor emeritus of business administration at the University of Illinois and a leading national gambling critic

    Expert: Justice Department reversal on online gambling 'correct decision'

    In reversing an Obama-era decision that effectively allowed internet gambling, the Department of Justice has revitalized the Interstate Wire Act of 1961, an anti-gambling statute championed by then-Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy to fight organized crime, said John W. Kindt, a professor emeritus of business administration at the University of Illinois and a leading national gambling critic.

  • Photo of Timothy Johnson, the Karl and Louise Schewe Professor of Finance at the Gies College of Business at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

    Paper: Value of vaccine to end COVID-19 pandemic worth 5%-15% of global wealth

    The monetary value of a vaccine that could potentially bring about the end of the COVID-19 pandemic is between 5%-15% of worldwide wealth, according to a new paper co-written by Timothy Johnson, the Karl and Louise Schewe Professor of Finance at the Gies College of Business at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

  • A new study from University of Illinois business professor Ravi S. Gajendran says telecommuting is positively associated with improvement in two important employee measures: task-based performance and organizational citizenship behavior.

    Benefits of telecommuting greater for some workers, study finds

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Even in a hyperconnected world where laptops, phones, tablets and now even wristwatches are tethered to the Internet 24/7, employers are still wary about the performance and social costs imposed by employees who work remotely.

  • Photo of Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations at the Urbana campus of the University of Illinois and the director of the Labor Education Program in Chicago.

    Are generous unemployment benefits to blame for worker shortages?

    As the COVID-19 pandemic recedes and employers look to restart businesses at full capacity, workers have leverage that they’re using to temporarily stay out of the labor market in certain industries, says U. of I. labor expert Robert Bruno.

  • Photo of U. of I. labor professor Ryan Lamare.

    Paper: Workplaces serve as training ground or deterrent for civic participation

    The workplace can function as a springboard for increased democratic participation, says new research co-written by U. of I. labor professor Ryan Lamare.

  • It's increasingly important for educators to understand how mobile technology such as touch-screen tablets can enhance learning instead of being classroom distractions, says Dilip Chhajed, a professor of business administration at Illinois and co-author of new research from a team of University of Illinois experts in business and e-learning.

    Research: Tablet computers good medium for educational materials

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Despite being more commonly thought of as a device designed for the passive consumption of content, touch-screen tablet computers can support the learning process when used in an educational setting - and not just as a mere e-reader or laptop replacement, according to new research from a team of University of Illinois experts in business and e-learning.

  • Photo of U. of I. labor professor M. Teresa Cardador.

    Perceived union support buoys 'meaningfulness of work' measures

    When employees think of their labor union as supportive and caring, says new research co-written by U. of I. labor professor M. Teresa Cardador, they are more likely to rate their union as fulfilling their psychological needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness – all of which are related to enhanced work meaningfulness.

  • Photo of Carlos Torelli, a professor of business administration and James F. Towey Faculty Fellow at Illinois

    Study: 'Value instantiation' key to luxury brands' embrace of corporate social responsibility

    Although luxury brands and social responsibility seem fundamentally inconsistent with each other, the two entities can coexist in the mind of the consumer, provided the brand can find someone – typically, a celebrity – who successfully embodies the two conflicting value sets, says new research co-written by Carlos Torelli, a professor of business administration and James F. Towey Faculty Fellow at Illinois.

  • Photo of University of Illinois labor and employment relations professor Michael LeRoy, an expert on employment law.

    Roseanne and NFL protesters: What are their speech rights?

    When an employer credibly cites harm to its business interests or reputation from employee speech, the employee has very little legal recourse if they’re fired because of it, said University of Illinois labor and employment relations professor Michael LeRoy, an expert on employment law.

  • Photo of U. of I. business professor and branding expert Carlos J. Torelli

    Political ideology and social norms can play a role in donation decisions, study says

    New research from U. of I. business professor and branding expert Carlos J. Torelli provides a more nuanced understanding of the role of political ideology and social norms on donation decisions.

  • Photo of Yilan Xu, a professor of agricultural and consumer economics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Paper: Disposal of wastewater from hydraulic fracturing poses dangers to drivers

    A new paper co-written by Yilan Xu, a professor of agricultural and consumer economics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, shows that the growing traffic burden in shale energy boomtowns resulted in a surge of road fatalities and severe accidents.

  • Professor Robert Bruno

    Would a universal basic income in the U.S. reduce inequality?

    A Minute With...™ labor expert Robert Bruno

  • Photo of Gies College of Business finance professors Julian Reif, Tatyana Deryugina, David Molitor and Nolan Miller.

    New study examines mortality costs of air pollution in US

    Scholars from the Gies College of Business at Illinois – from left, Julian Reif, Tatyana Deryugina, David Molitor and Nolan Miller – studied the effects of acute fine particulate matter exposure on mortality, health care use and medical costs among older Americans through Medicare data and changes in local wind direction.

  • Photo of U. of I. labor professor Emily E. LB. Twarog, the recipient of a 2019 Frederick Burkhardt Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies.

    Illinois labor professor awarded ACLS fellowship

    University of Illinois labor professor Emily E. LB. Twarog is the recipient of a 2019 Frederick Burkhardt Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. The award will fund the research and writing of her second book, “Hands Off: The History of Sexual Harassment Resistance in the Service Sector, 1935-2018.”

  • Photo of Carlos Torelli, a professor of business administration and the James F. Towey Faculty Fellow at the Gies College of Busines at Illinois.

    Study: Cultural variables play important role in perceptions of status, power

    Cultural variables play an important role in perceptions of status and power in business, according to research co-written by Carlos Torelli, a professor of business administration and the James F. Towey Faculty Fellow at the Gies College of Busines at Illinois.

  • Photo of Robert Habans, a postdoctoral research associate in the School of Labor and Employment Relations at the University of Illinois.

    Paper: State of Illinois’ middle class shrinking

    The state of Illinois’ sizable middle class has experienced a consistent but multifaceted squeeze since roughly 1980, according to Robert Habans, a postdoctoral research associate in the School of Labor and Employment Relations at the University of Illinois.

  • Photo of Richard L. Kaplan, an internationally recognized expert on U.S. tax policy and the Guy Raymond Jones Chair in Law at Illinois.

    Would cutting payroll taxes help prevent recession?

    Cutting the payroll tax could represent the middle-class tax cut that President Trump campaigned on – although changes would need to go through the legislative process and any economic stimulus likely wouldn’t been seen until after the November 2020 election, said Richard L. Kaplan, an internationally recognized expert on U.S. tax policy and the Guy Raymond Jones Chair in Law at Illinois.

  • Photo of Ujjal Kumar Mukherjee, a professor of business administration at the Gies College of Business at Illinois.

    In impoverished communities, health care awareness as important as access, affordability

    New research co-written by Gies College of Business professor Ujjal Kumar Mukherjee studies the interdependence of affordability, awareness and access for health care delivery by nonprofits in underserved countries.

  • College of Business honors students

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The College of Business at the University of Illinois honored its students in April.

  • Photo of Craig Lemoine, the director of the Financial Planning Program at the College of ACES

    Is our flood insurance model broken?

    Craig Lemoine, the director of the Financial Planning Program at the College of ACES, discusses the flood insurance market in light of Hurricane Harvey losses.

  • Photo of Unnati Narang, a professor of business administration at the Gies College of Business.

    Study: Idea sharing increases online learner engagement

    Online learning engagement can be increased by nearly one-third by simply prompting students to share course ideas instead of personal details.

  • The government could save money and make air travel safer by offering free enrollment in TSA PreCheck to frequent travelers, according to a new study by Illinois computer science professor Sheldon H. Jacobson.

    TSA could save money by waiving PreCheck fees for frequent travelers, study finds

    There could be an easy way to reduce lines at the airport, increase security, and save the Transportation Security Administration money, according to a new study by University of Illinois researchers: waive the $85 fee for frequent fliers to enroll in the TSA PreCheck program, which allows pre-screened, verified travelers to go through expedited security at airports.

  • Illinois media professor Harsh Taneja co-wrote a study that found numerous ways corporations “nudge” our attention on the internet.

    Corporations directing our attention online more than we realize

    We don’t have the control we think we do in browsing the internet. Our notion of empowerment to see and find what we choose is “an illusion,” say the authors of a study – including Illinois media professor Harsh Taneja – that analyzed browsing data on a million people over one month of internet use. Corporations are “nudging” the flow of our online attention more than we realize, and often in ways that are hidden or beyond our control.

  • Photo of Julian Reif, a professor of finance and of economics at Illinois.

    Study: Medicare prescription drug benefit reduced elderly mortality by more than 2 percent

    The implementation of Medicare’s prescription drug benefit program has reduced elderly mortality by 2.2 percent annually since 2006, says a new study by Julian Reif, a professor of finance and of economics at Illinois.

  • Photo of Jeffrey R. Brown, the Josef and Margot Lakonishok Professor of Business and dean of the College of Business at Illinois.

    Paper: Decision to claim Social Security benefits influenced by ‘framing’

    Retirees are more likely to delay claiming Social Security benefits by as many as 15 months due to how the decision is “framed” to them, says a new paper co-written by Jeffrey R. Brown, the Josef and Margot Lakonishok Professor of Business and dean of the College of Business at Illinois.

  • Sheldon H. Jacobson

    Would a laptop and tablet ban enhance air travel security?

    Computer science professor Sheldon H. Jacobson discusses the proposed Department of Homeland Security ban of laptop and tablet computers in the passenger cabins of certain flights.

  • Photo of U. of I. labor and employment relations professor Emily E. LB. Twarog.

    For nurses in Illinois, expectation of violence ‘a fundamental part of the job,’ study says

    Workplace violence is an endemic problem for front-line health care workers in Illinois, says new research from U. of I. labor and employment relations professor Emily E. LB. Twarog.

  • Photo of U. of I. psychology professor Dolores Albarracin

    Social media as good a barometer of public health attitudes as traditional phone polling

    Social media data can be used as an additional source of information to gauge public opinion about health issues alongside traditional data sources like phone-based polling, says new research co-written by U. of I. psychology professor Dolores Albarracin.

  • With popularly elected judges, political influence pervades and taints Illinois courts, said U. of I. legal expert Michael LeRoy.

    Expert: Abolish partisan elections for Illinois judges

    With popularly elected judges, political influence pervades and taints Illinois courts, said U. of I. legal expert Michael LeRoy.

  • Ambient background noise turns out to be an important factor affecting creative cognition among consumers, according to research from Ravi Mehta, a professor of business administration at Illinois.

    Research: Too much, too little noise turns off consumers, creativity

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The sound of silence isn't so golden for consumers, and both marketers and advertisers should take note, says new research from a University of Illinois expert in new product development and marketing.

  • Photo of Eliza Forsythe, a professor of labor and employment relations and of economics at Illinois.

    Paper: Pandemic-fueled job losses exacerbating preexisting inequalities among workers

    Although workers of all demographics have experienced job losses due to COVID-19, workers who belong to more disadvantaged groups – women, racial and ethnic minorities, younger people and the less educated – have been disproportionately affected by unemployment, according to new research co-written by Eliza Forsythe, a professor of labor and employment relations and of economics at Illinois.

  • Photo of Ben Marx, a professor of economics at Illinois.

    For community college students, ‘nudge-induced borrowing’ increases achievement

    When student loan amounts were printed in community college financial aid award letters, it led to better academic results and, in the following year, an increase in transfers to four-year colleges, says new research from Ben Marx, a professor of economics at Illinois.

  • Photo of Yuqian Xu, a professor of business administration at the Gies College of Business at Illinois.

    Paper: Higher financial incentives for crowdsourced delivery workers can improve service

    Targeted financial incentives can increase the service capacity of crowdsourced delivery workers without incurring additional costs for retailers, according to new research co-written by Yuqian Xu, a professor of business administration at the Gies College of Business at Illinois.