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  • COVID-19 has added to trends working against theaters, but they won’t disappear, says Derek Long, a professor media and cinema studies at Illinois.

    Will movie theaters survive COVID-19?

    Summer is normally a season for blockbusters, but movie theaters will have special challenges this year, starting with a gamble on a few July releases. Derek Long, a professor of media and cinema studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, looks at the present and future of the business.

  • Feser: We must create a budget paradigm for the future

    Edward Feser, interim provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs, discusses a new budgeting approach. He said the approach is needed to help the campus move toward less dependency on state funding, to increase transparency in budgeting, and to ensure fiscal stability and academic excellence into the future.

  • Midwest volcanologist and geology professor Susan W. Kieffer holds a Charles R. Walgreen Jr. Chair at Illinois.

    What makes Merapi such a dangerous volcano?

     A Minute With™... Midwest volcanologist and geology professor Susan W. Kieffer

  • If enacted, a bill now in the Illinois Legislature could have a transformative effect on history curricula  and on youths  in Illinois public schools, according to Leslie K. Morrow, the director of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center at the University of Illinois.

    How might teaching inclusive history affect the educational, social climate in Illinois' public schools?

    Leslie K. Morrow, the director of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Resource Center, discusses the impact that a proposed law could have on the curricula and students in Illinois public schools.

  • The $2.25 billion philanthropic campaign “With Illinois,” the largest in the school’s history, was launched in October 2017.

    University surpasses $2.25B fundraising goal a year early; campaign will continue

    The University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign’s “With Illinois” philanthropic campaign has met its $2.25 billion mark in gifts and commitments, but the campaign will continue in light of a variety of ongoing needs.

  • Chancellor's Distinguished Staff Award honors eight employees

    The Chancellor’s Distinguished Staff Award honors eight civil service staff employees for exceptional performance.

  • Willard Airport switches to a new parking system

    A new, automated system that allows flyers to pay for parking with credit cards has replaced the parking booth at the University of Illinois Willard Airport. Customers who wish to pay with cash may pay for parking inside the terminal.

  • A team of workers removes a section of a mural at the former location of La Casa Cultura Latina

    Conservation process continues for La Casa’s beloved mural

    The chirp of screws being driven into wood and the whirr of drills filled the air in the front room of the old white house at 510 E. Chalmers St. that’s the birthplace of La Casa Cultural Latina and the former home of the U. of I.’s department of Latina/Latino studies.

    Art-handling company Terry Dowd Inc. project manager Darren Martin and his work crew are creating a roughly 6 feet by 6 feet panel, part of the “bread” that will be used to make a large art “sandwich.”  The “meat” is a section of lathe, plaster and wallpaper of part of a wall covered with a vivid mural filled with bold depictions of heritage and social justice, of individual and community strength.

    “We basically sandwich the walls,” Martin said. “It almost turns it into a crate.”

  • Professor Anita Hund

    Is the tide of sexual misconduct allegations shifting the balance of power?

    News reports, social media campaigns such as #MeToo are raising awareness of sexual misconduct and helping survivors find their voices, says educational psychologist Anita Hund

  • Photo of Michael LeRoy, an expert in labor law and labor relations at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

    Do labor laws need to be modernized with rise of gig economy?

    The Protecting the Right to Organize Act would be the most significant revision of U.S. labor law since 1947, says Michael LeRoy, an expert in labor law at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

  • Electric performance

    What has become a favorite feature of the annual Engineering Open House is the Tesla Coil Concert, hosted this year on the Bardeen Engineering Quad.

  • Photo of professor Roy Campbell

    Can the FBI hack the iPhone?

    A Minute With...™ computer scientist Roy H. Campbell

  • image of professor john kindt

    Has fantasy sports crossed the line to become another form of online gambling?

    A Minute With...™ John Kindt, expert on business and legal policy

  • Practice made perfect: Men make the women's volleyball team better

    If you visit a women’s volleyball practice you might be surprised to see one or two men on the court. There they are, playing against the women, spiking the ball over the net or jumping high to block a shot. These men are practice players, helping the women hone their skills. The men serve as hitters, blockers, motivators or whatever else the team needs.

  • University of Illinois researcher Ben Grosser

    Will hiding 'like' counts and other numbers improve social media?

    Social media companies are experimenting with hiding metrics on their platforms – something University of Illinois art professor Ben Grosser has been exploring since 2012 with his Demetricator projects.

  • U. of I. is No. 2 in nation among public universities for international students

    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is the second top destination for international students attending public universities in the United States, according to the annual Open Doors report, released Nov. 16 by the Institute of International Education. The report ranks Illinois as second in the nation for international students in 2014-15 (fifth when accounting for private schools) and ninth for students participating in study abroad programs in 2013-14. According to the report, there are more international students studying in the U.S. today than at any time in history.

  • Physics professor Philip W. Phillips is one of two University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign faculty members to be elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences this year.

    Illinois computer scientist, physicist elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign computer science professor Sarita V. Adve and physics professor Philip W. Phillips have been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the oldest honor societies in the nation.

  • Professor Richard Kaplan

    Who wins and loses in proposed tax reform?

    Richard Kaplan, an internationally recognized expert on U.S. tax policy, discusses the Republican tax overhaul plan now before Congress

  • Photo of Richard L. Kaplan, an internationally recognized expert on tax policy and retirement issues, and the Guy Raymond Jones Chair in Law at Illinois.

    Should the age for required minimum distributions from retirement accounts be raised?

    Changes to the age for required minimum distributions from retirement accounts could be made after the 2018 mid-term elections, said Richard L. Kaplan, an internationally recognized expert on tax policy and retirement issues, and the Guy Raymond Jones Chair in Law at Illinois.

  • Four Illinois students receive national funding for overseas foreign language study

    Champaign, Ill. – Graduate students Bradford Coyle, Miriam Keep and Phoebe Shelor and undergraduate Daniel Levin have received prestigious Boren Awards for study abroad during 2016-17.

  • The Kurds are unlikely to fully realize any hopes of autonomy, says Illinois political scientist Avital Livny, who specializes in the politics of religion and ethnicity in the Middle East.

    Will anything ever change for the Kurds?

    A U. of I. specialist on Middle Eastern politics explains why Kurds often feel they have “no friends but the mountains,” why they’re a political threat to Turkey’s president and motivations for the recent Turkish attack on the Kurds in Syria.

  • Board of trustees approves revised background check policy

    The University of Illinois Board of Trustees on Thursday approved a revised policy requiring background checks for all new faculty, academic professional and civil service employees.

  • Faculty members, academic professionals retire

    Between Sept. 1, 2009, and Aug. 31, 2010, 270 faculty members and academic professionals retired from the UI, according to the Office of Academic Human Resources. Of those new retirees, 171 retired under the Voluntary Separation Incentive Program or Voluntary Retirement Program. (Last year, during the same time, 143 academic employees retired.)

  • Demographer and Illinois professor of sociology Cynthia Buckley is part of The Census Project.

    How worried should we be about the 2020 census?

    An accurate census is essential for public and private planning, but the 2020 effort is underfunded and behind schedule, an Illinois expert says.

  • Photo of University of Illinois social work professor and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellow for 2019-20 Liliane Windsor

    Illinois social work professor named Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellow

    Liliane Windsor, a professor of social work at the University of Illinois, has been named a Health Policy Fellow by the National Academy of Medicine and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

  • Illinois communication professor John Murphy’s new book examines the legacy of John F. Kennedy through his speeches.

    What can we learn from JFK about presidential speechmaking?

    An Illinois professor looks at presidential speechmaking through one of its more-eloquent practitioners, John F. Kennedy.

  • Photo of Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois.

    How will upcoming Supreme Court case, teacher strikes affect organized labor?

    A pending U.S. Supreme Court case could lead to the most significant changes in labor relations since the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947, says Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois.

  • Solar Farm ready to provide renewable energy to campus

    A ribbon cutting ceremony Nov. 19 commemorated the campus’ Solar Farm being connected to the university’s electrical distribution system a week earlier. The farm is expected to produce 7.86 million killowatt-hours per year or approximately 2 percent of the average electrical demand for the Urbana campus.

  • Photo of Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations at the Urbana campus of the University of Illinois and the director of the Labor Education Program in Chicago.

    Does lack of paid sick time make US susceptible to global health crisis?

    Lack of paid sick time makes the U.S. acutely susceptible to a global health crises like COVID-19, and is part of the larger problem of tying health care to employment, says U. of I. labor expert Robert Bruno.

  • Styrecycle introduces a new way to reduce campus waste

    Expanded polystyrene – more commonly known by its brand name “Styrofoam” – is everywhere. It makes up your disposable coffee cup, the packing peanuts in those care packages to students, and the insulation in your office walls. At Illinois, countless bottles of chemicals, biology specimens and fragile parts of lab equipment arrive in packaging made of Styrofoam every day, and, sadly, almost all of it gets tossed in the trash.

  • Rashid Bashir, a professor of bioengineering, has been named the executive associate dean of the Carle Illinois College of Medicine.

    Bashir named executive associate dean of Carle Illinois College of Medicine

    The Carle Illinois College of Medicine has appointed a permanent executive associate dean: Rashid Bashir, a professor and the department head of bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  • Roger Ebert’s Film Festival will be in September 2021, rather than April.

    2021 Roger Ebert's Film Festival moved to September

    The 2021 edition of Roger Ebert’s Film Festival, or “Ebertfest,” has been moved to early September due to uncertainties related to COVID-19.

  • Illinois professor Jay Rosenstein directed a 1997 documentary on the use of American Indian mascots in sports, and says “nothing compares” to the retirement of Redskins by the NFL team in Washington, D.C.

    Why is the NFL team in Washington, D.C., changing its name?

    The NFL team in the nation’s capital will no longer be the Redskins. It’s the highest-profile retirement of an American Indian name by a sports team in decades, says Jay Rosenstein, an Illinois professor of media and cinema studies. His documentary on the use of American Indian mascots in sports aired in 1997 and he has closely followed the issue since.

  • Oboe major Amelia Lee uses a knife to refine an oboe reed. On the table, her reed case is filled with reeds in various stages of completion.

    Shaving cane: Making music by the micrometer

    Amelia Lee wasn’t sure she wanted to attend the University of Illinois. As a serious oboist, her idea of college was an arts institution such as Oberlin Conservatory or the Manhattan School of Music. Her mother, however, wanted Lee to get a more well-rounded education, and with a top-10 ranked music school, the U. of I. suited them both.

  • Photo of Robin Fretwell Wilson, the Roger and Stephany Joslin Professor of Law and the director of the Program in Family Law and Policy at the University of Illinois College of Law.

    Why laws restricting bathroom access to transgender people won't work

    A Minute With...™ Robin Fretwell Wilson, director of the Program in Family Law and Policy

  • Brian Ogolsky

    'Positive illusions' in romantic relationships

    A Minute With™... Brian Ogolsky, a professor of human development and family studies, who studies romantic relationships

  • On the Job: Valeri Nesbitt-Howard

    When Valeri Nesbitt-Howard started working at the U. of I.'s Bruce D. Nesbitt African American Cultural Center last year, it was like returning to a home she never really left.

  • Photo of Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations at the Urbana campus of the University of Illinois and the director of the Labor Education Program in Chicago.

    Will legalizing marijuana be a boon to the state of Illinois?

    By legalizing and taxing recreational marijuana, the state of Illinois could fund additional pension payments while making investments in public education, construction projects, and drug treatment and prevention programs, says Robert Bruno, a professor of labor and employment relations at the Urbana campus of the University of Illinois and the director of the Labor Education Program in Chicago.

  • Dial-A-Carol has nary a silent night after news of it goes viral

    The campus Dial-A-Carol program broke its previous record by a long shot this holiday season, racking up an amazing 12,000 calls in seven days.

  • Portrait of Jon Hale dressed in a suit and tie

    How might Freedom Schools promote educational equity in Illinois?

    Educational history professor Jon Hale discusses how Freedom Schools promote civil rights and educational equity and the implications for Illinois in funding these schools as part of the state's education reform initiative.

  • Communicating about risk in an epidemic can be a challenge, especially when comparing the levels of risk between different social groups, says Illinois communication professor Cabral Bigman.

    How should we talk about our relative risk for COVID-19?

    A key message coming through about COVID-19 is that older folks face much greater danger, but what does that suggest to the young? Cabral Bigman, a communication professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, talks about the challenge of “social comparison frames” in an epidemic.

  • Campus Awards for Excellence in Faculty Leadership were awarded in the categories of faculty mentoring, executive officer distinguished leadership and faculty leadership.

    Four faculty members honored with Campus Awards for Excellence in Faculty Leadership

    Four University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign faculty members were honored by the Office of the Provost with the Campus Awards for Excellence in Faculty Leadership.

  • At right, Catherine Best, a research professor of bioengineering, supervises students, including REU participant Javier de Jesus Astacio, center, who is studying mechanical engineering at the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, and Yujin Lee, an Illinois junior in bioengineering.

    Summer Study: Program provides undergrads with research experience

    This summer, 10 undergraduate students performed research using advanced imaging and microscopy technologies through the Discoveries in Bioimaging Research Experience for Undergraduates.

  • Hong Kong’s protests grow out of the city’s unique history as a former British colony and Cold War cultural battleground, says Illinois historian Poshek Fu.

    What explains the persistence of Hong Kong protest?

    Hong Kong’s nearly four-month protest is only the latest in a series, all centered on concerns about retaining freedoms and gaining the right to choose the city’s leadership, says University of Illinois history professor Poshek Fu, a Hong Kong native and specialist on modern China. The current protest movement is notable, however, for its social media-driven, guerrillalike tactics, its longevity and the international attention it has received.

  • May Berenbaum has been appointed editor-in-chief of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

    Berenbaum named PNAS editor-in-chief

    University of Illinois entomology professor and department head May Berenbaum, a member of the National Academy of Sciences and longtime editorial contributor to the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and other journals, has been appointed editor-in-chief of PNAS, effective Jan. 1.

  • Doctoral student Sophia Balakian

    What does refugee vetting look like on the ground?

    A doctoral student found that the vetting process for refugees seeking U.S. admission was long and intense.

  • Physics and astronomy professor Stuart Shapiro used data from a computer simulation that solves Einsteins equations of general relativity to create a visualization of merging binary black holes.

    100 years of relativity: How has Einstein's theory shaped modern physics, astronomy?

    A Minute With...™ U. of I. physicist Stuart Shapiro

  • Filters showing a color change (pink) when they are working and yellow when they  are spent

    NASA awards $750,000 contract to startup for ‘smart’ color-changing air filters for space suits

    Serionix, a startup based on a technology created at the U. of I. and incubated at the EnterpriseWorks accelerator at Illinois, received a $750,000 contract from NASA to fund continued development of filters to remove toxic gases from next-generation spacesuit life-support systems. The same technology is on its way into consumer products expected to launch within the year. 

     

  • Julie Bobitt, the director of the Interdisciplinary Health Sciences program at Illinois, talks about the Illinois Opioid Alternative Pilot Project.

    Could cannabis be a pain relief alternative to opioids?

    The Opioid Alternative Pilot Project offers medical cannabis as a pain-relief option for those looking to avoid or reduce opioid use, said Julie Bobitt, the director of the Interdisciplinary Health Sciences program at Illinois.

  • Modified teaching option helps tenure-track faculty devote time to family

    The University of Illinois’ family leave policy was revised recently to remove a teaching requirement for tenure-track faculty members after the birth or adoption of a child.