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  • Four students honored by Goldwater scholarship program

    Three University of Illinois students have been nationally recognized with Barry M. Goldwater scholarships, which support students with potential to contribute to the advancement of research in the natural sciences, mathematics or engineering.  A fourth Illinois student was selected for honorable mention

  • U. of I. psychology professor Eva Pomerantz studies the factors that promote children’s motivation and achievement at school.

    How to foster children’s learning while sheltering at home

    Parents sheltering at home with their kids sometimes struggle to foster their children’s continued engagement with learning. Eva Pomerantz, a professor of psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, studies the factors that promote children’s motivation and achievement at school. She spoke to News Bureau life sciences editor Diana Yates about her research on the topic and her own efforts to keep her children academically engaged while at home.

  • Illinois professors Erik McDuffie and Carol Symes have been awarded National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships for 2017.

    Two Illinois professors awarded NEH Fellowships

    Illinois professors Erik McDuffie and Carol Symes have been awarded National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships for 2017.

  • Pamela Greer is one of 21 faculty and staff members honored for excellence in teaching, mentoring and advising.

    Faculty, staff and teaching assistants honored with Campus Awards for Excellence in Instruction

    The University of Illinois is honoring 21 faculty and staff members and graduate teaching assistants for excellence in teaching, mentoring and advising.

  • Check yourselves and your pets for ticks after spending time in wooded or grassy areas, says Illinois entomologist Brian Allan.

    Should we worry about ticks this summer?

    Editor’s note: The number of tick-borne illnesses diagnosed annually in the United States doubled between 2004 and 2016, according to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Summer is prime tick season, and people spending time outdoors should be vigilant, says University of Illinois entomology professor Brian F. Allan. An expert in the spread of insect- and tick-borne diseases, Allan discussed ticks in Illinois, how to prevent bites and when to seek medical attention in an interview with News Bureau biomedical sciences editor Liz Ahlberg Touchstone.

  • Political science professor Nicholas Grossman teaches international relations and wrote a book on the use of drones in warfare and terrorism.

    The US used a drone to kill an Iranian general. What might be the consequences?

    An expert on the growing role of drones in warfare and terrorism discusses the implications of the recent killing of Iranian general Qassim Suleimani in a Q&A.

  • Photos of new NAS members

    Three Illinois faculty members elected to National Academy of Sciences

    Three University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign professors have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest professional honors a scientist can receive. Physics professor Nadya Mason and chemistry professors Ralph Nuzzo and Wilfred van der Donk are among 120 newly elected U.S. members – 59 of whom are women, the most elected in a single year – and 30 international members in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.

  • christopher benson

    60 years ago this month, Emmett Till's death sparked a movement

    A Minute With...™ Christopher Benson, author and professor of journalism

  • Photo of Richard L. Kaplan, an internationally recognized expert on U.S. tax policy and the Guy Raymond Jones Chair in Law at Illinois.

    Would changes to capital gains taxes spur the economy?

    Indexing capital gains to inflation could be a simple fix to stimulate a teetering economy, but several significant implementation hurdles remain, said Richard L. Kaplan, an internationally recognized expert on U.S. tax policy and the Guy Raymond Jones Chair in Law at Illinois.

  • Chancellor's Scholars named to Campus Honors Program

    Chosen for their academic excellence and leadership potential, 131 freshmen and sophomores at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been designated Chancellor’s Scholars in the Campus Honors Program this fall. The Campus Honors Program admits up to 125 freshmen each year and up to 20 additional students join the program at the beginning of their sophomore year.

  • Eight honored with distinguished staff award

    Eight civil service staff employees were honored with the Chancellor's Distinguished Staff Award at a banquet April 25 at the Student Dining and Residential Programs building. The award recognizes exceptional performance.

  • Ngumbi speaks at a podium with an image of a flowering plant projected behind her.

    Ngumbi receives AAAS award for public engagement with science

    University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign entomology professor Esther Ngumbi is the 2021 recipient of the Mani L. Bhaumik Award for Public Engagement with Science, an annual award from the American Association for the Advancement of Science presented to scientists and engineers in recognition of their contributions to public engagement with science.

  • 'Red Tails': Why the story of the Tuskegee Airmen is still important

    A Minute With™... Sundiata Cha-Jua, a professor of history and of African American Studies

  • Bob Reid, influential journalism professor at Illinois, dies at age 64

    Robert D. Reid, a recently retired professor of journalism at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, suffered a heart attack and died early today at his home in Champaign. He was 64.

     

  • On the Job: Brooke Eisenmenger

    She just returned from Turkey and is planning a trip to Israel. This is the work life of Brooke Eisenmenger, the director of international advancement.

  • Five Urbana campus faculty members have been named University Scholars.

    Five Urbana-Champaign campus professors named University Scholars

    Five University of Illinois professors at the Urbana-Champaign campus have been named University Scholars in recognition of their excellence in teaching, scholarship and service.

  • Einstein Bros. Bagels opens at Siebel Center and Vet Med

    Einstein Bros. Bagels has opened two more campus locations: the Thomas M. Siebel Center for Computer Science and the College of Veterinary Medicine’s Basic Sciences Building.

  • Police begin enforcement of campus smoking policy

    The U. of I. Police Department last week started citing smokers who flout the campus's smoking ban.

  • Professor Craig Gundersen

    Would replacing food stamps with food boxes reduce hunger?

    Swapping food stamps for food boxes would mean scrapping 'the most successful government program we have going today,' said U. of I. professor Craig Gundersen

  • Illinois physics professor Liang Yang discusses the significance of the recent neutrino detection in Antarctica and what it means for the future of observational astronomy.

    What is a neutrino and why do they matter?

    Scientists recently announced the discovery of a subatomic particle that made its way to Earth from an event that occurred 3.7 billion light-years away. Sensors buried within Antarctic ice detected the ghostly cosmic particle, called a neutrino, and traced its origin to a rapidly spinning galactic nucleus known as a blazar. Physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian spoke with physics professor Liang Yang about the significance of the discovery.

  • Design plans showing plants, a path and a bench.

    YingYing Zhang Garden to be dedicated Oct. 11

    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Chancellor Robert J. Jones and Kimberlee K. Kidwell, the dean of the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences, invite faculty members, staff, students and the public to the dedication of the YingYing Zhang Garden.

  • Jason Mock

    Academic professionals honored with CAPE awards for 2021, 2020

    A total of 12 academic professionals at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign were honored this week with the Chancellor's Academic Professional Excellence award, encompassing the 2020 and 2021 award cycles. The award recognizes academic professionals for their work, personal and professional contributions.

  • Schools must regularly collect data about the educational needs of students with disabilities to write meaningful Individualized Educational Plans for them every year, University of Illinois special education professor James Shriner said.

    What quality of education are schools required to provide to students with disabilities?

    Special education professor James Shriner on a case recently heard by the U.S. Supreme Court to decide the educational benefits that public schools are required to provide to students with disabilities.

  • Busboom's dream house has more than medieval theme

    Depending on the dreamer, the phrase "dream house" means different things. To Bruce Busboom, construction superintendent in the Facilities and Services Division, it meant a castle - complete with a drawbridge and a pair of gargoyles spouting water 30 feet down into a moat. Nestled in dense woods north of Mahomet, Busboom Castle is a symbol of one man's perseverance and ingenuity at bringing his dream to life - with the help of his friends.

  • Photo of  U. of I. biology and geology professor Bruce W. Fouke and postdoctoral research fellow Joseph L. Cross

    How can educators, coaches support student-athletes’ academic success?

    Coaches and educators should work together to help athletes achieve their full potential, U. of I. scholars and former collegiate athletes Joseph L. Cross and Bruce W. Fouke say in a new study.

  • Urbana campus faculty members named University Scholars

    Seven Urbana campus faculty members have been named University Scholars and will be honored at a campus reception Sept. 28 from 4:30 to 6 p.m. in the ballroom of the Alice Campbell Alumni Center, 601 S. Lincoln Ave., Urbana.

  • Photo of Ian Brooks, the director of the Center for Health Informatics

    Where does the U.S. withdrawal leave the World Health Organization?

    A global response, such as that organized by the World Health Organization, is needed to control the COVID-19 pandemic, says Ian Brooks, a research scientist whose focus is global health informatics.

  • Illinois alumna among first group of Knight-Hennessy Scholars

    Leah Matchett, of Grand Haven, Michigan, and an alumna of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is one of 49 students selected in the first year of the Knight-Hennessy Scholar program for postgraduate study at Stanford University.

  • New eText option making textbooks interactive, cheaper

    There is a revolution brewing in the textbook world and, of course, the University of Illinois is leading it.

  • Professor Thomas Rudolph

    What makes political distrust such a problem?

    The polarization and dysfunction in Congress has spread in recent years to the voting public, says professor Thomas Rudolph, but it’s more about simply disliking political opponents than differences over ideology.

  • Universities decisions to no longer require ACT/SAT scores and to award reverse-transfer degrees to students could make college degrees attainable for more students, according to Eboni Zamani-Gallaher, the director of the Office of Community College Research and Leadership at the U. of I.

    How is higher education making college degrees more attainable?

    Eboni Zamani-Gallaher, the director of the Office of Community College Research and Leadership at the University of Illinois, discusses initiatives that are making college degrees attainable for more students.

  • Jonas Kurniawan and Simone Heo received hands-on experience and equipment training as undergraduate researchers in professor John Rogers lab.

    Laboratory Learning: Research teaches students about flexibility—in electronics and in life

    “Fabricating flexible electronics is my thing. I love it!” said Seung Yun “Simone” Heo, her enthusiasm evident even while speaking about the technical processes of metal vapor deposition and electron beam lithography. “We’re making everything from scratch. I can do it myself from step one. It’s not that hard to do, it’s more about time and effort.”

  • Actors Scott Wilson and Maja Komorowska in a scene from “A Year of the Quiet Sun,” the first film announced for this year’s “Ebertfest.”

    First film and guests announced for 21st annual ‘Ebertfest’

    A post-World War II romance is the first film announced for this year’s “Ebertfest,” coming April 10-13 to downtown Champaign and the U. of I. The film will be shown in memory of its co-star, Scott Wilson, a frequent past festival guest. Organizers also announced an added role in this year’s festival for film critic Richard Roeper.

  • Meet the Class of 2019

    A graphic illustration of the freshman class, which boasts the university’s largest class since 2005.

  • Graphic combining the portraits of the four Illinois students awarded Barry M. Goldwater scholarships

    Four Illinois students honored with Goldwater scholarships

    Four University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign students were awarded Barry M. Goldwater scholarships for their potential to contribute to the advancement of research in the natural sciences, mathematics or engineering.

  • Professor Michael Leroy

    How do employers combat a resurgent white supremacy movement?

    Labor and employment relations professor Michael LeRoy discusses his research about confronting a resurgent white supremacy movement.

  • Roger Ebert’s Film Festival will return in April 2021.

    2020 Roger Ebert’s Film Festival canceled

    This year’s Roger Ebert’s Film Festival, or “Ebertfest,” has been canceled due to concerns related to the coronavirus.

  • Nonprofit newsrooms are providing a significant new source for news, says University of Illinois journalism professor Brant Houston.

    Are there alternatives to declining, disappearing newspapers?

    As many newspapers decline and disappear – highlighted by two Chicago Tribune reporters recently sounding the alarm about a perceived threat to the Trib – a journalism professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign touts the growth and viability of nonprofits and other alternatives.

  • Garrett Anderson

    Student veterans say new center is a lifeline and oasis

    Returning service men and women have always faced the challenge of reintegrating into civilian life. But those returning with disabilities because of a combat injury face the additional challenge of having to redefine their physical identity.

  • One hundred years after the widespread fatalities of the 1918 flu pandemic, influenza is still a serious and deadly disease, says professor Christopher Brooke. Flu shots and new antiviral treatments could help thwart another pandemic.

    100 years after influenza pandemic, why should I get a flu shot?

    Influenza has no cure, but vaccines and anti-viral treatments could help thwart another deadly outbreak, says microbiology professor Christopher Brooke.

  • The major shift underway from broadcast and cable to streaming is also bringing targeted advertising to mainstream media, an Illinois professor says.

    Targeted ads are coming to mainstream media. Should we care?

    Targeted advertising is coming to mainstream media, says an Illinois professor of digital media, bringing concerns about equality, division and “total surveillance.”

  • Craig Miller stands in the woods facing the camera. He is wearing a red and black plaid shirt and he has his hands in his pockets.

    Does hunting with lead ammunition endanger human, environmental health?

    A recent study from Wesleyan University found that 48% of ground meat samples made from white-tailed deer killed with lead shotgun slugs in Illinois were contaminated with lead, while meat from deer killed by archers contained no lead. Illinois Natural History Survey human dimensions scientist Craig Miller spoke to News Bureau life sciences editor Diana Yates about the risks associated with lead ammunition in hunting.

  • Four students at the University of Illinois were selected to study in world regions critical to U.S. interests as recipients of David L. Boren Scholarships.

    Illinois students awarded Boren Scholarships

    Four students at the University of Illinois were selected to study languages in world regions critical to U.S. interests as recipients of David L. Boren Scholarships.

  • Georgian prime minister – an Illinois alumnus – to visit Urbana campus April 27

    Giorgi Kvirikashvili, the prime minister of the country of Georgia and a 1998 master’s degree graduate in finance from the University of Illinois, will speak on campus April 27. He will make remarks and take questions at 4:45 p.m. in the Deloitte Auditorium of the Business Instructional Facility, 515 E. Gregory Drive, Champaign. The event is open to the public.

  • 36 Illinois students awarded NSF Graduate Research Fellowships

    Thirty-six University of Illinois students have won National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships, including 31 graduate students and five undergraduates. An additional 52 students were accorded honorable mention.

  • New Faces 2015: Wencui Han

    Wencui Han is a new assistant professor in the department of business administration in the College of Business.

     

  • Urbana campus faculty members named University Scholars

    Six Urbana campus faculty members have been named University Scholars and will be honored at a campus reception Sept. 26 from 4:30 to 6 p.m. in the ballroom of the Alice Campbell Alumni Center, 601 S. Lincoln Ave., Urbana.

  • Feser: We must create a budget paradigm for the future

    Edward Feser, interim provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs, discusses a new budgeting approach. He said the approach is needed to help the campus move toward less dependency on state funding, to increase transparency in budgeting, and to ensure fiscal stability and academic excellence into the future.

  • Ronald Bailey

    The social trends behind the '12 Years a Slave' story

    A Minute With™... Ronald Bailey  the head of the African American studies department at the University of Illinois

  • COVID-19 has added to trends working against theaters, but they won’t disappear, says Derek Long, a professor media and cinema studies at Illinois.

    Will movie theaters survive COVID-19?

    Summer is normally a season for blockbusters, but movie theaters will have special challenges this year, starting with a gamble on a few July releases. Derek Long, a professor of media and cinema studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, looks at the present and future of the business.