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  • Key to willpower lies in believing you have it in abundance

    Americans believe they have less stamina for strenuous mental activity than their European counterparts -- an indication that people in the U.S. perceive their willpower or self-control as being in limited supply, suggests a new study led by a researcher at the University of Illinois.

  • Illinois physics professor named national Professor of the Year

    Mats Selen, professor of physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been named Outstanding Doctoral and Research Universities Professor of the Year by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

  • Carle Illinois College of Medicine welcomes first class of students

    The Carle Illinois College of Medicine, the world’s first engineering-based medical school, welcomed its first class of 32 students July 2.

    A partnership between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Carle Health System, the college aims to create a cohort of physician-innovators who exemplify the qualities of compassion, competence, curiosity and creativity. The students will receive full four-year tuition scholarships, privately funded, valued at more than $200,000 each.

  • Six Illinois researchers named AAAS fellows

    Six researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  • Siblings play formative, influential role as 'agents of socialization'

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - What we learn from our siblings when we grow up has - for better or for worse - a considerable influence on our social and emotional development as adults, according to an expert in sibling, parent-child and peer relationships at the University of Illinois.

  • Computer app whets children’s appetites for eco-friendly meals

    A new educational software application under development at the University of Illinois is introducing middle school students to the topic of climate change and showing them how their dietary choices affect the planet.

  • Adding technology to geometry class improves opportunities to learn

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - A new study co-written by a University of Illinois expert in math education suggests that incorporating technology in high school-level geometry classes not only makes the teaching of concepts such as congruency easier, it also empowers students to discover other geometric relationships they wouldn't ordinarily uncover when more traditional methods of instruction were used.

  • On-campus child care needed for increasing number of student-parents

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The lack of affordable, high-quality on-campus day care programs that cater to undergraduate students who double as parents is a stealth issue that has the potential to harm both the student-parent and the child, says a University of Illinois expert in early childhood education.

  • Social skills, extracurricular activities in high school pay off later in life

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - It turns out that being voted "Most likely to succeed" in high school might actually be a good predictor of one's financial and educational success later in life.

  • Study links responsible behavior in high school to life success 50 years later

    A new study links doing one’s homework, being interested and behaving responsibly in high school to better academic and career success as many as 50 years later. This effect, reported in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, holds true even after accounting for parental income, IQ and other factors known to influence achievement, researchers report.

  • Tim Nugent a pioneer in changing life for people with disabilities

    Tim Nugent, who died Wednesday at the age of 92 in Urbana, Illinois, was a visionary who changed the world for people with disabilities. Starting with a small program at the University of Illinois a few years after World War II – but for years with little support, and often outright opposition – Nugent sought to change both the opportunities for people with disabilities and public attitudes about them.

  • First-semester GPA a better predictor of college success than ACT score

    Underrepresented students’ first-semester GPA may be a better predictor of whether they’ll graduate college than their ACT score or their family’s socioeconomic status, a new study found.

  • Core curriculum committee formed for Carle Illinois College of Medicine

    Dr. Robert Good and professor Rashid Bashir have been named co-chairs of the 18-member group that will lead the effort to build the engineering-based Carle Illinois College of Medicine’s core curriculum. 

  • Sexual harassment common among middle school children, study finds

    Sexual harassment is a prevalent form of victimization that most antibullying programs ignore and teachers and school officials often fail to recognize, according to a new five-year study by researchers at the University of Illinois.

  • Computerized testing pioneer Hua-Hua Chang to receive achievement award

    College of education faculty member Hua-Hua Chang will receive 2017 E.F. Lindquist Award from the American Educational Research Association and the American College Testing Program at the AERA Awards Luncheon on April 29. The luncheon will take place during the AERA’s annual meeting, April 27-May 1 in San Antonio.

  • The edTPA assessment and licensing of student teachers

    A Minute With...™ Illinois Professor Chris Roegge, executive director of the Council on Teacher Education

     

  • Project embeds computer science lessons in math instruction for K-5 students

    A two-year project funded by the National Science Foundation is laying the groundwork for meeting society’s growing demand for citizens literate in computer science by integrating computing with elementary school mathematics – an approach that holds promise for democratizing access to computer science education and promoting diversity within the U.S. technology workforce.

  • Is affirmative action in college admissions under threat?

    An Illinois expert on affirmative action in higher education talks about the Justice Department’s plans to investigate possible racial discrimination in college and university admissions policies

  • Beyond the big ads: teaching kids ad literacy and nutrition in grade school classrooms

    The Super Bowl will feature car ads, beer ads, food ads – but probably none for carrots. Most food ads, game time or anytime, are pitching less-healthy fare. Kids are often the target. Do they understand what an ad is? Who made it and why? Advertising professor Michelle Nelson worked with an Illinois school district to develop an advertising literacy curriculum that also promotes healthy eating.

     

  • Is the Every Student Succeeds Act an improvement over No Child Left Behind?

    A Minute With...™ Lizanne DeStefano, professor emerita of educational psychology

  • Lessons in nature boost classroom engagement afterward, researchers report

    Third-graders who spend a class session in a natural outdoor setting are more engaged and less distracted in their regular classroom afterward than when they remain indoors, scientists found in a new study.

  • Bisexual teens at highest risk of bullying, truancy, suicide

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth are at greater risk of suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts, bullying by their peers and truancy, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Illinois.

  • E-Learning can have positive effect on classroom learning, scholar says

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Traditional classroom teaching in higher education could learn a thing or two from online teaching, otherwise known as e-learning, according to a University of Illinois professor who studies computer-mediated communication, information exchange and the Internet.

  • Seventh-graders learn astrophysics through mixed-reality computer simulation

    Researchers at the University of Illinois hope to inspire greater numbers of young people to become astronomers – or at least to embrace learning science – with a new computer simulation that engages children’s bodies as well as their minds in learning about how objects move in space.

  • Anderson named College of Education dean

    James D. Anderson, the interim dean of the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will become the dean effective Aug. 16.

  • Color-blind racial ideology linked to racism, both online and offline

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Images from racial theme parties that are posted on social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace not only elicit different reactions from different people based on their race and their attitudes toward diversity, they also represent an indirect way to express racist views about minorities, according to published research by a University of Illinois professor who studies the convergence of race and the Internet.

  • Children from chaotic homes benefit from time in child care, study finds

    Children in poverty from chaotic homes have better cognitive, social and behavioral outcomes if they spent 35 or more hours weekly in child care.

  • Professor makes legal case for schools to challenge cyberbullies

    Schools have a limited ability to challenge cyberbullies, but an Illinois professor has made a legal study on how to change that.

  • Wounds from childhood bullying may persist into college years, study finds

    Childhood bullying inflicts the same long-term psychological trauma on girls as severe physical or sexual abuse, suggests a new survey of nearly 500 college students.

  • Is the tide of sexual misconduct allegations shifting the balance of power?

    News reports, social media campaigns such as #MeToo are raising awareness of sexual misconduct and helping survivors find their voices, says educational psychologist Anita Hund

  • 'The Game Changer' documentary on accessibility pioneer Tim Nugent premieres Sept. 22 on BTN

    A new 30-minute documentary tells the story of Tim Nugent, known by many as the “Father of Accessibility,” who founded the first comprehensive program for college students with physical disabilities at the University of Illinois. Prior to the start of that program, people with disabilities were not expected to go to school, find employment or play sports.

  • What quality of education are schools required to provide to students with disabilities?

    Special education professor James Shriner on a case recently heard by the U.S. Supreme Court to decide the educational benefits that public schools are required to provide to students with disabilities.

  • How has the definition of ‘effective leadership’ changed?

    David Rosch, a professor of agriculture education and an expert on leadership, spoke recently about popular perceptions of good leadership and how those standards have changed.

  • Benefits of online interaction for teens outweigh danger, professor says

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Is there such a thing as being too safe on the Internet? One University of Illinois education researcher believes there is, at least when teenagers are concerned.

  • College of Education opens new digital learning research laboratory

    The College of Education will host an event Sept. 30 to debut a new research laboratory that enables scholars to study learner interactions with digital technologies in real time while collecting massive amounts of varied data.

  • Spending on public higher education overlooks net benefits as investment in state’s future

    Thinking of higher education funding as an investment that lowers costs – and not as mere consumption spending – could reframe the debate in Springfield, according to research from Walter W. McMahon, an emeritus professor of economics and of educational organization and leadership at the University of Illinois.

  • Anderson named College of Education interim dean

    James D. Anderson, the head of the department of education policy, organization and leadership and the executive associate dean for the College of Education, will become the interim dean of the College of Education effective Aug. 16.

  • How former slaves established schools and educated their population after the Civil War

    A Minute With™... Christopher Span, a professor of educational policy studies

  • Group learning makes children better decision-makers, study finds

    Children who participate in collaborative group work to learn about significant social issues become better decision-makers than their peers who learn the same curriculum through teacher-led discussions, a new study finds.

  • Study examines Teach For America’s impact on costs, hiring at five school systems

    Teach For America has reaped millions of dollars in nonrefundable finder’s fees from school systems in the U.S. through lucrative contracts that require schools to hire designated numbers of the organization’s corps members – whether or not its teachers meet districts’ specific content or grade-level needs, a new study suggests.

  • Adults with disabilities on Medicaid wait list most likely to have unmet service needs

    Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities on Illinois’ Medicaid wait list who are minorities, in poor health or unable to speak are more likely to have unmet service needs, a new study by University of Illinois researchers found.

  • Quality, quantity lacking in children's educational TV, study says

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Commercial broadcasters are doing the "bare minimum and not much more" for children's educational programming, according to University of Illinois communication professor Barbara Wilson, one of two lead researchers on a study released today (Nov. 12) by the organization Children Now.

  • Will Illinois’ new education law fix the state’s teacher shortage?

    Chris Roegge, the executive director of the Council on Teacher Education at the University of Illinois, discusses whether new legislation in Illinois will remedy the state's shortage of teachers.

  • Illinois receives grant to help study community college transfer students

    A $700,000 grant awarded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to the Office of Community College Research and Leadership at the University of Illinois will fund new studies focused on helping community college transfer students earn baccalaureate degrees.

  • Wealthy donors, think tanks major influences on education policy, study says

    Venture philanthropists are dramatically reshaping public education policymaking in the U.S. by funding integrated networks of think tanks and advocacy organizations that work together to push through to implementation education laws that these wealthy donors favor, a new study by University of Illinois researchers suggests.

  • New technique can track drug and gene delivery to cells

    University of Illinois researchers say they now know how to track and map drug and gene delivery vehicles to evaluate which are most effective at infiltrating cells and getting to their targets, insight that could guide development of new pharmaceutical agents. The researchers described their tracking system and their findings on the most effective delivery vehicles in the journal Nature Communications. 

  • Study: First Amendment offers scant protection for professors

    When academics choose to litigate speech disputes with colleges and universities, they end up losing nearly three-quarters of the time – a finding that points to the growing tension between academic freedom and campus speech codes, says U. of I. labor and employment relations professor Michael LeRoy.

  • Bullying more violent in school with gangs nearby, study finds

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The presence of gangs in the vicinity of schools creates a pervasive climate of fear and victimization among students, teachers and administrators that escalates the level of aggression in bullying incidents and paralyzes prevention efforts, suggests a new study in the journal Psychology of Violence.

  • Study: Girls more likely than boys to struggle with social, behavioral, academic needs

    The more failing grades students have during eighth grade, the more likely they are to experience social-emotional learning problems, academic difficulties and behavioral problems as high school freshmen, a new study found.

     

  • Relationship building among co-workers key driver of workplace socialization

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - A sink-or-swim mentality for socializing new employees will ultimately only drain organizations of their best talent over time, according to new research by a University of Illinois expert in workplace dynamics.