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  • Our brains process irony in emojis, words in the same way

    The brain processes ironic or sarcastic emojis in the same way it does ironic or sarcastic words.

  • Discovery: Mechanical properties of viral DNA determine the course of infection

    A new study reveals a previously unknown mechanism that governs whether viruses that infect bacteria will quickly kill their hosts or remain latent inside the cell. The discovery, reported in the journal eLife, also may apply to viruses that infect humans and other animals, the researcher said.

  • Infants can distinguish between leaders and bullies, study finds

    A new study finds that 21-month-old infants can distinguish between respect-based power asserted by a leader and fear-based power wielded by a bully.

  • Study: Denver’s inequities in park access traced to segregation, funding policies

    Exclusionary zoning codes and funding policies that favored wealthy white neighborhoods explain why some Denver residents have less access to the city's parks, a University of Illinois researcher found.

     

  • College towns important to alumni’s enjoyment of homecoming events, study finds

    Out-of-town alumni's enjoyment of homecoming events depends almost as much on their fondness for the college town as for the institution itself, University of Illinois researchers found in a new study.

  • Color-changing sensor detects signs of eye damage in tears

    A new point-of-care rapid-sensing device can detect a key marker of eye injury in minutes – a time frame crucial to treating eye trauma.  

    University of Illinois researchers developed a gel laden with gold nanoparticles that changes color when it reacts with a teardrop containing ascorbic acid, released from a wound to the eye. In a new study published in the journal Biosensors and Bioelectronics, the researchers used the sensor, called OjoGel, to measure ascorbic acid levels in artificial tears and in clinical samples of fluid from patients’ eyes. 

  • Ancient African herders had lasting ecological impact on grazed lands

    Ancient animal herders added to the ecological richness and diversity of the African savanna thousands of years ago – an effect that persists to the present day, a new study finds. The herders’ practice of penning their cattle, goats and sheep at night created nutrient-rich grassy glades, called hotspots, that still attract wildlife and have increased habitat diversity in the region, researchers report in the journal Nature.

  • How is higher education making college degrees more attainable?

    Eboni Zamani-Gallaher, the director of the Office of Community College Research and Leadership at the University of Illinois, discusses initiatives that are making college degrees attainable for more students.

  • Post-workout muscle building and repair blunted in obese adults, study finds

    Obesity is associated with a host of health problems, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. According to a new study reported in the Journal of Physiology, obesity also diminishes a person’s ability to build muscle after engaging in resistance exercise.

  • Connectivity explains ecosystem responses to rainfall, drought

    In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers reveal techniques – inspired by the study of information theory – to track how changes in precipitation alter interactions between the atmosphere, vegetation and soil at two National Science Foundation Critical Zone Observatory sites in the western United States.

  • Flatlands Dance Film Festival kicks off dance department’s 50th year with ‘If the Dancer Dances,’ short films

    The Flatlands Dance Film Festival – the largest in the Midwest – will kick off the 50th anniversary season of the University of Illinois dance department.

  • College tours for Chinese teens a rapidly growing market for tourist industry

    Many teens in China are embarking on study tours of U.S. colleges, creating a potentially lucrative market sector for universities, college towns and tourism-related businesses in the Midwest, a new study found.

  • Many young adults lack financial literacy, economic stability, study finds

    Many youths lack financial literacy and money-management skills, indicating an urgent need for educational programs that will help them enter adulthood better equipped to handle their financial affairs, a new study found.

  • A professor not afraid to cross academic boundaries

    Illinois professor Ruby Mendenhall is focused on issues of poverty, inequality and violence, but crosses many academic boundaries in search of answers.

  • Pointy eggs more likely to stay put in birds’ cliffside nests, study finds

    Natural selection – that merciless weeder-outer of biological designs that are out of step with the times – also is a wily shaper of traits. Exhibit A is the pointy murre egg, according to new research published in the Journal of Experimental Biology.

  • Study shows diminished but ‘robust’ link between union decline, rise of inequality

    A new study shows a diminished but “robust” link between the decline of unions and the rise in wage inequality.

  • Playing a parasite for science

    It’s 5:30 a.m. in the tree farms outside Urbana, but the birds have been up for an hour already. I sip my coffee, putting on rubber boots that will be little help against the dewy, waist-high grass. A couple of brown birds sit on telephone wires above me, and I have a feeling I am being watched. These are brown-headed cowbirds, which lay their eggs in other species’ nests and then let the nest’s owners raise the offspring.

  • Founder of musical theater troupe for people with disabilities to give Goldstick Lecture

    Krista Wilkinson, the founder of a musical theater troupe for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, will give the annual Goldstick Family Lecture in the Study of Communication Disorders at the University of Illinois on Sept. 13.

  • New CRISPR technique skips over portions of genes that can cause disease

    In a new study in cells, University of Illinois researchers have adapted CRISPR gene-editing technology to cause the cell’s internal machinery to skip over a small portion of a gene when transcribing it into a template for protein building. This gives researchers a way not only to eliminate a mutated gene sequence, but to influence how the gene is expressed and regulated.

    Such targeted editing could one day be useful for treating genetic diseases caused by mutations in the genome, such as Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy, Huntington’s disease or some cancers.

  • ‘Illinois Artists’ documentary showcases talented faculty members, students and alumni

    A pioneering ballerina, a groundbreaking theater company and nationally known jazz musicians are featured in a new program on the Big Ten Network. “Illinois Artists” captures University of Illinois performing arts professors, students and alumni performing in New York, Chicago and Urbana. The 30-minute documentary premieres Aug. 21 at 11 p.m. CT on BTN.

  • Study: Human wastewater valuable to global agriculture, economics

    It may seem off-putting to some, but human waste is full of nutrients that can be recycled into valuable products that could promote agricultural sustainability and better economic independence for some developing countries.

  • Krannert Art Museum programs to bring art and students together

    Krannert Art Museum aims to attract more students with new programs that include social activities, internships and free student memberships.

  • What should we make of the ‘68 Chicago Democratic Convention now?

    A U. of I. political historian looks back 50 years at the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago.

  • Maya Rituals Unearthed

    Deep in the untamed lowlands, we search for artifacts buried under hundreds of years of sediment. We are excavating two ancient Maya sites nestled in the sacred landscape of Cara Blanca in central Belize. Both date to A.D. 800-900, when prolonged and severe droughts struck this region, disrupting the daily life of the Maya.

  • Krannert Center residency gives choreographer Jessica Lang resources to create new work

    Choreographer Jessica Lang’s new dance piece, created during a residency at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, was inspired by the cultures and layers of history making up urban landscapes.

  • For now, Illinois’ imperiled eastern massasauga rattlesnakes retain their genetic diversity

    A long-term study of eastern massasauga rattlesnakes in Illinois reveals that – despite their alarming decline in numbers – the few remaining populations have retained a surprising amount of genetic diversity.

  • Latinos on TV: Where are they? And when should we laugh?

    Professor Isabel Molina-Guzman’s new book examines the role of Latinos in TV sitcoms, as well as the changing form of the genre in a “post-racial” television era.

  • Finding an ancient Maya city in the jungles of Belize

    The jungles of central Belize contain thousands of species of insects, birds, reptiles, mammals, trees and flowers. They also contain ancient Maya cities, some of which remain unknown and unexplored. 

  • Study finds possible connection between U.S. tornado activity, Arctic sea ice

    The effects of global climate change taking place in the Arctic may influence weather much closer to home for millions of Americans, researchers report.

  • Genomic study ties insect evolution to the ability to detect airborne odors

    A new study reveals that all insects use specialized odorant receptors that enable them to detect and pursue mates, identify enemies, find food and – unfortunately for humans – spread disease. This puts to rest a recent hypothesis that only some insects evolved the ability to detect airborne odors as an adaptation to flight, the researchers said.

  • Paper: Workplaces serve as training ground or deterrent for civic participation

    The workplace can function as a springboard for increased democratic participation, says new research co-written by U. of I. labor professor Ryan Lamare.

  • Nowhere to hide: Molecular probe illuminates elusive cancer stem cells in live mice

    After a primary tumor is treated, cancer stem cells may still lurk in the body, ready to metastasize and cause a recurrence of the cancer in a form that’s more aggressive and resistant to treatment. University of Illinois researchers have developed a molecular probe that seeks out these elusive cells and lights them up so they can be identified, tracked and studied not only in cell cultures, but in their native environment: the body.

    In a paper published in the journal ACS Central Science, the researchers described the probe’s effectiveness in identifying cancer stem cells in cultures of multiple human cancer cell lines as well as in live mice.

  • Tracking a forest’s recovery one year after storm

    We walk out of the typical southern Illinois shady forest into a crazy jumble of fallen trees, thorny vines and tangled shrubs. It’s almost 100 degrees, the humidity is over 85 percent and all of the shade has disappeared. My lab mate and her undergraduate technician volunteered to work with me today, and I wonder what I’ve gotten them into.

  • Study: In darters, male competition drives evolution of flashy fins, bodies

    Scientists once thought that female mate choice alone accounted for the eye-catching color patterns seen in some male fish. But for orangethroat darters, male-to-male competition is the real force behind the flash, a new study finds.

  • Illinois lecturer receives Eisner Award for ‘Kindred’ graphic novel adaptation

    University of Illinois lecturer and alumnus Damian Duffy won an Eisner Award for the graphic novel adaptation of Octavia Butler’s science fiction novel “Kindred” that he created with U. of I. alumnus John Jennings.

  • New model reveals rips in Earth’s mantle layer below southern Tibet

    Seismic waves are helping researchers uncover the mysterious subsurface history of the Tibetan Plateau, possibly lending insight to future earthquake activity in the region.

  • Study: Student loans hamper wealth accumulation among black, Hispanic adults

    Black and Hispanic adults who graduate college with student loan debt have significantly lower net worth at age 30 than students who don't borrow to pay for college, according to a new study led by University of Illinois scholar Min Zhan.

  • Krannert Art Museum’s $10 million campaign supports acquisitions of work by female artists

    Krannert Art Museum has expanded its collection by acquiring more works by female artists of the 20th century, with the support of a recently concluded five-year, $10 million fundraising initiative.

  • Chemicals that keep drinking water flowing may also cause fouling

    Many city drinking water systems add softening agents to keep plumbing free of pipe-clogging mineral buildup. According to new research, these additives may amplify the risk of pathogen release into drinking water by weakening the grip that bacteria – like those responsible for Legionnaires’ disease – have on pipe interiors.  

  • Study explores risk factors linked to chikungunya and dengue outbreaks

    In one of the largest studies of its kind, researchers analyzed chikungunya and dengue outbreak data from 76 countries over a period of 50 years, focusing on regions across the Indian Ocean that are hard hit by these and other mosquito-borne infectious diseases.

  • In search of ‘white birds in a nest’

    It’s summer in the Florida Panhandle, and we are either drenched in rain or covered in sweat. The mosquitoes are out in full force, and the risk of stumbling upon a venomous snake in the seepage slope and swamps is palpable. If I can look beyond the immediate discomfort, the payoff is enormous.

  • Summer concerts by string musicians part of music workshop at Illinois

    Several world-class string musicians will perform at the University of Illinois as part of a summer string workshop.

  • In rats, perinatal exposure to phthalates impairs brain structure and function

    Male and female rats exposed in the womb and during lactation to plasticizing chemicals known as phthalates had significantly fewer neurons and synapses than those that were not exposed, researchers report in a new study. The phthalate-exposed rats had reductions in the size of their medial prefrontal cortex, a brain region that regulates behavior, and showed deficits in cognitive flexibility.  

  • What is a neutrino and why do they matter?

    Scientists recently announced the discovery of a subatomic particle that made its way to Earth from an event that occurred 3.7 billion light-years away. Sensors buried within Antarctic ice detected the ghostly cosmic particle, called a neutrino, and traced its origin to a rapidly spinning galactic nucleus known as a blazar. Physical sciences editor Lois Yoksoulian spoke with physics professor Liang Yang about the significance of the discovery.

  • Using an electronic device counteracts benefits of taking a break in nature, researchers find

    Using a laptop negates the benefits that nature offers in recovering from mental fatigue, according to research from the University of Illinois.

  • The journey to becoming a physician-innovator

    A member of the inaugural class recounts her application and surprise acceptance to the Carle Illinois College of Medicine

  • Study: Protein found to be key component in irregularly excited brain cells

    Researchers discovered that the tumor suppressor protein p53 is involved in the irregular brain cell activity seen in autism spectrum disorders and epilepsy.

  • Paper: Email incivility has a ripple effect on households

    The negative repercussions of email incivility extend beyond the workplace, and can even negatively affect a domestic partner’s attitude toward their own work, says a new paper from YoungAh Park, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois.

  • The weavers of Tambo Perccaro

    About 70 people are waiting for us in the courtyard of the community center when we arrive. They are llama herders, farmers and weavers. Many have walked for miles to be here, some with small children on their backs. We’re not sure what the community center staff told this crowd to get them to show up, but we’re here, and we’ve got something useful to share.

  • Products of omega-3 fatty acid metabolism may have anticancer effects, study shows

    A class of molecules formed when the body metabolizes omega-3 fatty acids could inhibit cancer’s growth and spread, University of Illinois researchers report in a new study in mice.