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  • Soil temperatures and moisture levels declining in early March

    Cooler, drier weather has led to declining soil temperatures and moisture levels, according to Jennie Atkins, Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring Program manager at the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

  • Decision-making is shaped by individual differences in the functional brain connectome

    Each day brings with it a host of decisions to be made, and each person approaches those decisions differently. A new study by University of Illinois researchers found that these individual differences are associated with variation in specific brain networks – particularly those related to executive, social and perceptual processes.

  • Deaths

    Etha Jereen Broom ... Constance “Connie” Ellen Brown ... Carole Couch ... Sue Jones ... Maurice “Doc” Mecum ... Emily Ann Stipes Watts 



  • Native Pop artist collective brings a weekend of events

    Native Pop, an organization that brings American Indian pop art and art making to widespread venues and communities, will present a weekend of events March 30-31 titled “Native Pop Presents: Strong Women: Reclaiming Imagery.” The events feature MaryBeth Nelson (Cherokee), Serena Penaloza (Navajo and Maricopa) and Brent Learned (Cheyenne-Arapaho), who will bring their art, insight and skills to a variety of programs.


  • Researchers demonstrate existence of new form of electronic matter

    Researchers have produced a “human scale” demonstration of a new phase of matter called quadrupole topological insulators that was recently predicted using theoretical physics. These are the first experimental findings to validate this theory.

  • Paper: Changes in NFL mirror changes in modern workplace

    The NFL has reflected the changing dynamics of the modern U.S. workplace due to the football-workplace connection that was forged during the sport’s early years, said Daniel A. Gilbert, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois and an expert who studies the cultural and labor history of sports.

  • Researchers tap problematic e-waste surplus to recover high-quality polymers

    Mixed-plastic electronics waste could be a valuable source of reusable polymers, a new study led by Illinois Sustainability Technology Center scientists suggests. The team has developed the first energy-efficient and environmentally friendly process that separates mixed polymers so that they can be recycled into new, high-quality plastic products.

  • U of I hosts conferences on hunger for university presidents, student leaders

    Conferences of the organizations Presidents United to Solve Hunger Leaders Forum and Universities Fighting World Hunger will take place on the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign campus this week, co-hosted by the University of Illinois at Chicago, the University of Illinois at Springfield and the University of Illinois System.


  • Emotional suppression reduces memory of negative events

    By peering at the brains of study subjects prompted to suppress negative emotions, scientists have gained new insights into how emotional regulation influences negative feelings and memories. They hope the findings will lead to new methods to combat depression.

  • Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities announces fellowships

    The Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities at the U. of I. has awarded its annual faculty and graduate student fellowships for the 2018-19 academic year to seven faculty members and seven graduate students. IPRH also announced the Ragdale Residential Creative Fellow for 2018.


  • Illinois recognized as a HEARTSafe campus

    Illini Emergency Medical Services, a student program under the Illinois Fire Service Institute, received national recognition recently when the U. of I. was awarded the designation of a HEARTSafe Campus. IEMS accepted the award Feb. 24 at the National Collegiate Emergency Medical Services Foundation Awards Reception in Philadelphia. 

  • Entrepreneur, UI grad Max Levchin to deliver commencement address

    Max Levchin, a U. of I. alumnus, co-founder of PayPal, former chairman of Yelp and currently the CEO and founder of the consumer-financing platform Affirm, will serve as the commencement speaker Saturday, May 12.  

  • Ag robot speeds data collection, analyses of crops as they grow

    A new lightweight, low-cost agricultural robot, developed by a team of scientists at the University of Illinois, could transform data collection and field scouting for agronomists, seed companies and farmers.


  • Study yields more than a million new cyclic compounds, some with pharmaceutical potential

    Researchers say they can now produce a vast library of unique cyclic compounds, some with the capacity to interrupt specific protein-protein interactions that play a role in disease. The new compounds have cyclic structures that give them stability and enhance their ability to bind to their targets.  

  • 20th Ebert Film Fest to open with 'The Fugitive' and feature guest Ava DuVernay

    The 20th Ebert Film Festival will open with "The Fugitive" and feature Ava DuVernay, the director of the Oscar-nominated "Selma" and "The 13th," among its guests.

  • Deaths

    Tom Percival ... Penny A. Watkins-Zdrojewski ... Robert J. Cheek

  • Annual report quantifies Illinois graduates’ first destinations

    Drawing from the experiences of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign students who recently completed undergraduate degrees, an annual survey indicates that the campus will once again exceed national averages related to graduates securing first destinations.

  • Job of a Congress member not one size fits all, authors find

    The job of a Congress member is not one size fits all, say two U. of I. political scientists. In fact, there are five "legislative styles."

  • Tarantulas in a pickle jar

    Storing your dead tarantulas in a gallon-sized pickle jar is not the best solution to long-term preservation. Especially when those tarantulas are toe-tagged – like corpses in a morgue. But that’s what I find this morning when I open one of the dozens of metal storage cabinets in the chilly insect collection: a pickle jar full of tarantulas.

  • Illinois soil temperatures warmer than normal this winter

    Illinois’ milder winter soil temperatures may have an impact on pest populations, according to researchers at the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

    Overall, soil temperatures were milder than normal, according to Jennie Atkins with the Illinois State Water Survey’s Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring Program. At depths of 4 inches under bare soil, temperatures averaged 35.2 degrees this winter, or 1.4 degrees above the long-term average. Soils averaged 1.8 degrees cooler than last winter. 

  • Krannert Art Museum publishes catalogue of Swahili art in conjunction with exhibition

    Krannert Art Museum at the U. of I. has published a multiauthored catalogue in conjunction with the exhibition “World on the Horizon: Swahili Arts Across the Indian Ocean.”

    On view at the museum, located at Sixth Street and Peabody Drive in Champaign, until March 24, “World on the Horizon” will travel to the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art in Washington, D.C., in May and then to Fowler Museum at UCLA in October.

  • Is the tide of sexual misconduct allegations shifting the balance of power?

    News reports, social media campaigns such as #MeToo are raising awareness of sexual misconduct and helping survivors find their voices, says educational psychologist Anita Hund

  • Deaths

    Thomas B. “Tom” Berns ... Richard “Dick” Blaney ... Karen M. Dudas

  • Brown receives Whiting Public Engagement Fellowship

    Ruth Nicole Brown, a professor of gender and women’s studies at Illinois, received a Whiting Public Engagement Fellowship for $50,000 to expand Black Girls Genius Week, a series of humanities-based workshops for African-American middle school- and high school-aged girls, from central Illinois to Chicago, San Diego and Columbia, South Carolina.

  • Ecological Society of America honors Yang

    The Ecological Society of America has named Wendy H. Yang, a professor of plant biology and geology at Illinois, as an Early Career Fellow. The society’s fellowship program recognizes the many ways in which its members contribute to ecological research and discovery, communication, education, pedagogy, management and policy.

  • Illinois theatre department, alumni celebrating program’s 50th anniversary

    The University of Illinois theatre department is celebrating its 50th anniversary with events March 3-5.

  • Virtual predator is self-aware, behaves like living counterpart

    Scientists report in the journal eNeuro that they’ve built an artificially intelligent ocean predator that behaves a lot like the original flesh-and-blood organism on which it was modeled. The virtual creature, “Cyberslug,” reacts to food and responds to members of its own kind much like the actual animal, the sea slug Pleurobranchaea californica, does.

  • Paper: Videos help medical students master physiology concepts

    Researchers at the University of Illinois College of Medicine and Carle Illinois College of Medicine have found that creating short videos that explain information presented during physiology lectures makes teaching easier for medical educators and learning easier for their students.

  • Illinois again a top producer of Fulbright U.S. Student Awards

    For the seventh time in the past eight years, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is among the top producers of Fulbright U.S. Student Awards, part of the U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange program.

  • Individual quantum dots imaged in 3-D for first time

    Researchers have developed an imaging technique that uses a tiny, super sharp needle to nudge a single nanoparticle into different orientations and capture 2-D images to help reconstruct a 3-D picture. The method demonstrates imaging of individual nanoparticles at different orientations while in a laser-induced excited state.

  • Illinois professor uses big data to research history of gender in fiction

    A big data research study by a University of Illinois professor shows a decline in the prominence of female characters in fiction and in the number of female authors from the 19th century to the 20th century.

  • Scientists seeking rare river crayfish aren't just kicking rocks

    As far as anyone can tell, the cold-water crayfish Faxonius eupunctus makes its home in a 30-mile stretch of the Eleven Point River and nowhere else in the world. According to a new study, the animal is most abundant in the middle part its range, a rocky expanse in southern Missouri – with up to 35,000 cubic feet of chilly Ozark river water flowing by each second.

  • Study links responsible behavior in high school to life success 50 years later

    A new study links doing one’s homework, being interested and behaving responsibly in high school to better academic and career success as many as 50 years later. This effect, reported in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, holds true even after accounting for parental income, IQ and other factors known to influence achievement, researchers report.

  • Deaths

    Marilois Barker ... Donald “Don” Lee Day ...Steven J. D’Urso ... Charles Walter “Erik” Eriksen ... Jack Theodore Harroun ... C. Rex Mahannah ... Kenneth Neil Statzer

  • Would replacing food stamps with food boxes reduce hunger?

    Swapping food stamps for food boxes would mean scrapping 'the most successful government program we have going today,' said U. of I. professor Craig Gundersen

  • Museum open house promotes campus collaboration

    Spurlock Museum of World Cultures at Illinois invites faculty, staff and graduate students to attend an open house on specialized research and learning opportunities on Thursday, March 8, from 3-6 p.m. The museum welcomes proposals for collaborative exhibitions, research projects and public programs. The event highlights opportunities for using the museum’s collection of more than 50,000 objects from six continents for classes and outreach.


  • Neuroimaging reveals lasting brain deficits in iron-deficient piglets

    Iron deficiency in the first four weeks of a piglet’s life – equivalent to roughly four months in a human infant – impairs the development of key brain structures, scientists report. The abnormalities remain even after weeks of iron supplementation begun later in life, the researchers found.

  • Museum’s Winter Tales concert features American Indian storytelling

    Spurlock Museum of World Cultures at Illinois will hold its annual Winter Tales concert, a celebration of American Indian storytelling, on Sunday, March 4, from 1-2:15 p.m. The featured storyteller is SleepyEye LaFromboise of the Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota and Tonawanda Seneca tribes. This family concert is free and no advanced reservations are required.

  • Portrayals of doctors in comics have become more realistic, nuanced

    Depictions of medical doctors in comics have become less stereotypical and more realistic, says Carol Tilley, a University of Illinois professor of information sciences and a comics historian and scholar.

  • Paper: 'Pseudo-contract' creeps into digital terms and conditions

    The boilerplate text that nobody reads when signing up for an online service has very tenuous legal footing, said Robin B. Kar, a University of Illinois legal scholar and internationally recognized expert in contract law.

  • Emancipated blacks often targeted for relocation to the tropics

    Every significant emancipation of black enslaved people in North America came with plans to relocate them to tropical areas, says a U. of I. historian.

  • Continental interiors may not be as tectonically stable as geologists think

    Geologic activity within stable portions of Earth’s uppermost layer may have occurred more recently than previously believed.

  • Sleep problems in menopause linked to hot flashes, depression - and may not last

    A new study of middle-aged women found that sleep problems vary across the stages of menopause, yet are consistently correlated with hot flashes and depression.

  • Illinois graphic design professor fights human trafficking with app, education

    A University of Illinois graphic design professor has developed a cellphone app that enables users to report suspected cases of human trafficking anonymously.

  • Deaths

    Donna Kuhlman ... Elsie Willfong ... John E. Zehr

  • Illinois alumna among first group of Knight-Hennessy Scholars

    Leah Matchett, of Grand Haven, Michigan, and an alumna of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is one of 49 students selected in the first year of the Knight-Hennessy Scholar program for postgraduate study at Stanford University.

  • Social media as good a barometer of public health attitudes as traditional phone polling

    Social media data can be used as an additional source of information to gauge public opinion about health issues alongside traditional data sources like phone-based polling, says new research co-written by U. of I. psychology professor Dolores Albarracin.

  • Three Illinois professors named Sloan Research Fellows

    Three Illinois scientists are among 126 recipients of the 2018 Sloan Research Fellowships from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. According to the foundation, the awards “honor early career scholars whose achievements mark them as among the very best scientific minds working today.” Winners receive a two-year $65,000 fellowship to further their research.

  • Study links fox domestication to gene activity in the pituitary gland

    A study of foxes offers new insights into the brain changes that occur in wild canids as they become more tame, researchers report. The study links fox domestication to changes in gene activity in the pituitary gland, a brain center that kicks out hormones to regulate various bodily functions, including the stress response.

  • Chasing waterfalls

    MIRI, MALAYSIA — We awake from our post-training slumber at 6:30 a.m. for an activity unlike any of the team-building exercises we have experienced so far. This is only the first week of training for the Fulbright Program here. There are nearly 100 of us on this waterfall hike, braving the rain and humidity together to swim in one of Malaysia’s hidden pools.