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  • Paper: School shootings affect school quality, housing value

    Home prices within a school district affected by a school-based mass shooting episode declined by 7.8 percent over the course of at least three years after the incident, according to a new paper co-written by University of Illinois scholar Juan Sebastian Munoz.

  • Campus celebrates the legacy of Project 500 with events Sept. 27-29

    A series of events commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Project 500 initiative will take place on the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign campus Sept. 27-29. 

  • Study: Los Angeles nonprofits improving park access for marginalized residents

    A coalition of nonprofits in Los Angeles led a park-equity movement that shifted California’s funding priorities and brought green spaces closer to the homes of low-income people of color, a new study found.

  • Deaths

    Martha JoAnn Milligan ... Charles William (Bill) Smith

  • Author David Quammen to speak about his book featuring microbiologist Carl Woese

    Author David Quammen will speak at the University of Illinois about his new book, which features the revolutionary work of microbiologist Carl R. Woese.

  • Graduate students awarded Department of Energy fellowship

    Two graduate students at Illinois have been awarded Department of Energy fellowships.

    Anda Trifan, a doctoral candidate in professor of biochemistry Emad Tajkhorshid’s research group, has been awarded a Department of Energy Computational Science Graduate Fellowship to support her research in theoretical and computational biophysics. Edward Hutter, a doctoral candidate in professor of computer science Edgar Solomonik’s research group, was awarded the fellowship to support his research in computer science.

  • Krannert Center’s new assisted listening system to benefit patrons with hearing loss

    Krannert Center for the Performing Arts has a new assisted listening system to help patrons with hearing impairment enjoy performances.

  • Researchers develop microbubble scrubber to destroy dangerous biofilms

    Stiff microbial films often coat medical devices, household items and infrastructure such as the inside of water supply pipes, and can lead to dangerous infections. Researchers have developed a system that harnesses the power of bubbles to propel tiny particles through the surfaces of these tough films and deliver an antiseptic deathblow to the microbes living inside.

  • Sulkin named College of Media dean

    Tracy Sulkin, a professor of political science in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and a U. of I. faculty member since 2002, is the dean designate of the College of Media effective Sept. 16, pending approval by the University of Illinois Board of Trustees.

  • Bike light giveaway at two campus locations 

    Bring your bike to the 11th annual Light the Night event on Thursday, Sept. 20 and get a free set of front and rear lights. Illinois law requires bicyclists riding at night to use lights.

  • From Chicago art to Chinese ceramics, Krannert Art Museum tells stories through its collections

    Krannert Art Museum exhibitions highlight Chicago art and blue and white ceramics from its collection.

  • Campus honored with award for excellence in diversity

    INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine recognized the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign for its diversity efforts by including the campus among the 96 schools receiving the 2018 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Award.

  • Soils are drying, warming across Illinois

    Soils are drying out after the early September rain, according to Jennie Atkins, Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring Program manager at the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

  • Knobloch honored with Charles H. Woolbert Research Award

    The National Communication Association announces the selection of Leanne Knobloch, a professor of communication at Illinois, as the 2018 recipient of the Charles H. Woolbert Research Award. 

  • Deaths

    Roy F. Block ... Carolyn Margaret (Rexroat) Dodd ... Mary Anne Hewing ... Timothy Gerard Hewing ... Raymond Ides ... David Kay ... Frederick “Fred” E. Payne ... Margaret R. Selin ... Joseph Tarbet Woolley

  • Designer enzyme conquers sulfite reduction, a bottleneck in environmental cleanup

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Researchers have cleared one hurdle toward environmental cleanup of certain contaminants with a newly designed synthetic enzyme that reduces the compound sulfite to sulfide – a notoriously complex multistep chemical reaction that has eluded chemists for years.

  • Ebert Symposium to feature IMAX film, astronaut videographer, storytelling with data

    The first Roger Ebert Symposium will explore the cinematic presentation of science with help from an IMAX film shot from space, a former astronaut and a diverse group of academics and experts.

  • Five Urbana-Champaign campus professors named University Scholars

    Five University of Illinois professors at the Urbana-Champaign campus have been named University Scholars in recognition of their excellence in teaching, scholarship and service.

  • Media advisory: Advisory group releases Native imagery report

    The Critical Conversations on Native Imagery Advisory Committee releases its report on a series of campus events that discussed the use of Native imagery on the Urbana campus.

  • Study: Kidney stones have distinct geological histories

    A geologist, a microscopist and a doctor walk into a lab and, with their colleagues from across the nation, make a discovery that overturns centuries of thought about the nature and composition of kidney stones. The team’s key insight, reported in the journal Scientific Reports, is that kidney stones are built up in calcium-rich layers that resemble other mineralizations in nature, such as those forming coral reefs or arising in hot springs, Roman aqueducts or subsurface oil fields.

  • Class of 2022 sets records for enrollment, diversity, first-generation students

    Among the Top 10 in numbers in the U.S., the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s freshman class sets new high marks for students from underrepresented backgrounds and first-generation college students, as well as a 10-year high of Illinois residents.

     

  • Adaptation of ‘The Turn of the Screw’ premieres at Krannert Center following artistic residency

    The New York-based Builders Association theater company will premiere “STRANGE WINDOW: The Turn of the Screw,” a new take on Henry James’ novella, at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts. The company developed the production during a residency at Krannert Center.

  • Should the age for required minimum distributions from retirement accounts be raised?

    Changes to the age for required minimum distributions from retirement accounts could be made after the 2018 mid-term elections, said Richard L. Kaplan, an internationally recognized expert on tax policy and retirement issues, and the Guy Raymond Jones Chair in Law at Illinois.

  • Archives exhibit documents role of Albert Lee, early advocate for African-American students

    An exhibit at the University of Illinois Archives commemorates the contributions of Albert Lee, who is considered the unofficial first dean for African-American students.

  • Study: Large-scale wind and solar farms in the Sahara would increase heat, rain, vegetation

    Wind and solar farms are known to have local effects on heat, humidity and other factors that may be beneficial – or detrimental – to the regions in which they are situated. A new climate-modeling study finds that a massive wind and solar installation in the Sahara Desert and neighboring Sahel would increase local temperature, precipitation and vegetation. Overall, the researchers report, the effects would likely benefit the region.

  • Our brains process irony in emojis, words in the same way

    The brain processes ironic or sarcastic emojis in the same way it does ironic or sarcastic words.

  • Discovery: Mechanical properties of viral DNA determine the course of infection

    A new study reveals a previously unknown mechanism that governs whether viruses that infect bacteria will quickly kill their hosts or remain latent inside the cell. The discovery, reported in the journal eLife, also may apply to viruses that infect humans and other animals, the researcher said.

  • Infants can distinguish between leaders and bullies, study finds

    A new study finds that 21-month-old infants can distinguish between respect-based power asserted by a leader and fear-based power wielded by a bully.

  • Study: Denver’s inequities in park access traced to segregation, funding policies

    Exclusionary zoning codes and funding policies that favored wealthy white neighborhoods explain why some Denver residents have less access to the city's parks, a University of Illinois researcher found.

     

  • College towns important to alumni’s enjoyment of homecoming events, study finds

    Out-of-town alumni's enjoyment of homecoming events depends almost as much on their fondness for the college town as for the institution itself, University of Illinois researchers found in a new study.

  • Color-changing sensor detects signs of eye damage in tears

    A new point-of-care rapid-sensing device can detect a key marker of eye injury in minutes – a time frame crucial to treating eye trauma.  

    University of Illinois researchers developed a gel laden with gold nanoparticles that changes color when it reacts with a teardrop containing ascorbic acid, released from a wound to the eye. In a new study published in the journal Biosensors and Bioelectronics, the researchers used the sensor, called OjoGel, to measure ascorbic acid levels in artificial tears and in clinical samples of fluid from patients’ eyes. 

  • Ancient African herders had lasting ecological impact on grazed lands

    Ancient animal herders added to the ecological richness and diversity of the African savanna thousands of years ago – an effect that persists to the present day, a new study finds. The herders’ practice of penning their cattle, goats and sheep at night created nutrient-rich grassy glades, called hotspots, that still attract wildlife and have increased habitat diversity in the region, researchers report in the journal Nature.

  • How is higher education making college degrees more attainable?

    Eboni Zamani-Gallaher, the director of the Office of Community College Research and Leadership at the University of Illinois, discusses initiatives that are making college degrees attainable for more students.

  • Post-workout muscle building and repair blunted in obese adults, study finds

    Obesity is associated with a host of health problems, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. According to a new study reported in the Journal of Physiology, obesity also diminishes a person’s ability to build muscle after engaging in resistance exercise.

  • Chancellor's Scholars named to Campus Honors Program

    The Campus Honors Program announces the names of 159 freshmen and sophomores at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who have been designated Chancellor’s Scholars.

     

  • Connectivity explains ecosystem responses to rainfall, drought

    In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers reveal techniques – inspired by the study of information theory – to track how changes in precipitation alter interactions between the atmosphere, vegetation and soil at two National Science Foundation Critical Zone Observatory sites in the western United States.

  • Flatlands Dance Film Festival kicks off dance department’s 50th year with ‘If the Dancer Dances,’ short films

    The Flatlands Dance Film Festival – the largest in the Midwest – will kick off the 50th anniversary season of the University of Illinois dance department.

  • Illinois Commitment will help students from middle-income families attend Illinois

    Through a combination of institutional, federal and state aid, including Pell Grants and Monetary Award Program grants, Illinois Commitment will provide financial awards to cover the tuition and campus fees for in-state students whose family income is less than $61,000, the current median family income in Illinois.

  • College tours for Chinese teens a rapidly growing market for tourist industry

    Many teens in China are embarking on study tours of U.S. colleges, creating a potentially lucrative market sector for universities, college towns and tourism-related businesses in the Midwest, a new study found.

  • Many young adults lack financial literacy, economic stability, study finds

    Many youths lack financial literacy and money-management skills, indicating an urgent need for educational programs that will help them enter adulthood better equipped to handle their financial affairs, a new study found.

  • A professor not afraid to cross academic boundaries

    Illinois professor Ruby Mendenhall is focused on issues of poverty, inequality and violence, but crosses many academic boundaries in search of answers.

  • Pointy eggs more likely to stay put in birds’ cliffside nests, study finds

    Natural selection – that merciless weeder-outer of biological designs that are out of step with the times – also is a wily shaper of traits. Exhibit A is the pointy murre egg, according to new research published in the Journal of Experimental Biology.

  • Study shows diminished but ‘robust’ link between union decline, rise of inequality

    A new study shows a diminished but “robust” link between the decline of unions and the rise in wage inequality.

  • Playing a parasite for science

    It’s 5:30 a.m. in the tree farms outside Urbana, but the birds have been up for an hour already. I sip my coffee, putting on rubber boots that will be little help against the dewy, waist-high grass. A couple of brown birds sit on telephone wires above me, and I have a feeling I am being watched. These are brown-headed cowbirds, which lay their eggs in other species’ nests and then let the nest’s owners raise the offspring.

  • Founder of musical theater troupe for people with disabilities to give Goldstick Lecture

    Krista Wilkinson, the founder of a musical theater troupe for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, will give the annual Goldstick Family Lecture in the Study of Communication Disorders at the University of Illinois on Sept. 13.

  • Kevin Hamilton named College of Fine and Applied Arts dean

    Kevin Hamilton will become the dean designate of the College of Fine and Applied Arts effective Aug. 17, pending approval of the three-year appointment by the University of Illinois Board of Trustees. Hamilton is a professor of new media in the School of Fine and Applied Arts and is a senior associate dean for the college. He served as a Provost Fellow during the 2017-18 academic year, working to develop campus programming to facilitate conversation on divisive topics.

  • New CRISPR technique skips over portions of genes that can cause disease

    In a new study in cells, University of Illinois researchers have adapted CRISPR gene-editing technology to cause the cell’s internal machinery to skip over a small portion of a gene when transcribing it into a template for protein building. This gives researchers a way not only to eliminate a mutated gene sequence, but to influence how the gene is expressed and regulated.

    Such targeted editing could one day be useful for treating genetic diseases caused by mutations in the genome, such as Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy, Huntington’s disease or some cancers.

  • May 2018 graduates, Dean’s List and Bronze Tablet honorees named

    The University of Illinois has announced Dean’s List and Bronze Tablet honorees and graduates for the 2018 spring semester. 

  • ‘Illinois Artists’ documentary showcases talented faculty members, students and alumni

    A pioneering ballerina, a groundbreaking theater company and nationally known jazz musicians are featured in a new program on the Big Ten Network. “Illinois Artists” captures University of Illinois performing arts professors, students and alumni performing in New York, Chicago and Urbana. The 30-minute documentary premieres Aug. 21 at 11 p.m. CT on BTN.

  • Study: Human wastewater valuable to global agriculture, economics

    It may seem off-putting to some, but human waste is full of nutrients that can be recycled into valuable products that could promote agricultural sustainability and better economic independence for some developing countries.