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  • Carbon sequestration policy must balance private property, public good

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The lack of a settled legal framework that balances private property rights while maximizing the public good ultimately hinders the large-scale commercial deployment of geologic carbon sequestration, according to published research by a University of Illinois expert in renewable energy law.

  • Microbial transport at Yellowstone: by land, sea or air?

  • Holonyak to receive institute's highest honor

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Nick Holonyak Jr., a John Bardeen Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has been selected as the 2003 recipient of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Medal of Honor.

  • Portable sampling cart monitors emissions from wood-burning cookstoves

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - A new method of measuring emissions from cookstoves could help improve human health and enhance the accuracy of global climate models.

  • Illinois professor awarded the 2002/3 Wolf Prize in Physics

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Anthony J. Leggett, a professor of physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been selected as a recipient of the 2002/3 Wolf Prize in physics. He shares the prize with Bertrand I. Halperin of Harvard University.

  • New algorithm speeds simulations of complex fluids

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Computer simulations play an essential role in the study of complex fluids - liquids that contain particles of different sizes. Such liquids have numerous applications, which depend on a fundamental understanding of their behavior. But the two main techniques for the atomistic simulation of liquids - the molecular dynamics technique and the Monte Carlo method - have limitations that greatly reduce their effectiveness.

  • Puzzling height of polar clouds linked to solar radiation

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Scientists have discovered why polar mesospheric clouds over the South Pole are nearly two miles higher than those over the North Pole. A variation in solar radiation - a result of Earth's elliptical orbit - is responsible, they say.

  • Two University of Illinois faculty members earn 2010 Sloan Fellowships

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Two University of Illinois faculty members have been selected to receive 2010 Sloan Research Fellowships from the Alfred P. Sloan foundation: Yann R. Chemla, a professor of physics, and Karrie Karahalios, a professor of computer science.

  • Three U. of I. faculty members selected as 2012 Sloan Fellows

    CHAMPAIGN,Ill. - Three University of Illinois professors have each been selected to receive a 2012 Sloan Research Fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

  • Two researchers elected to the National Academy of Engineering

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Two University of Illinois researchers -- Karl Hess and Thomas S. Huang -- have been elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering.

  • European modernism and information society focus of U. of I. conference

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Scholars representing disciplines as diverse as architecture, urban planning, science, technology, cultural studies and library and information science - will gather May 6-8 at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign for a conference on "European Modernism and the Information Society: Informing the Present, Understanding the Past."

  • Illinois professor to receive global energy prize

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Nick Holonyak Jr., a John Bardeen Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been selected as a 2003 recipient of the Global Energy Prize from Russia. He shares the $900,000 prize with Gennady Mesiats of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Yan Douglas Smith of Titan Pulse Sciences Division.

  • Professor receives Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers at White House

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Charles F. Gammie, a professor of physics and of astronomy at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, was among 60 young researchers named as recipients of the 2001 Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the government on young professionals at the outset of their independent research careers. Gammie received his award July 12 in a White House ceremony.

  • UI instructor tweets at final space shuttle launch

    When it comes to science, Joanne Manaster admittedly inspires easily.

  • Asymmetric feature shows puzzling face for superconductivity

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The weird behavior of electrons tunneling across an atomically flat interface within a cuprate superconductor has defied explanation by theories of high-temperature superconductivity.

  • Evolutionary software to be released free of charge

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - New software developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign allows scientists to more effectively analyze and compare both sequence and structure data from a growing library of proteins and nucleic acids.

  • Illinois professor wins Packard Fellowship

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Scott K. Silverman, a professor of chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is among 16 U.S. researchers named 2003 Packard Fellows in natural sciences by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. He will receive $625,000 during the next five years to enhance his research efforts.

  • U. of I., Singapore establishing information technology center

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Agency for Science, Technology and Research, or A*STAR, a Singapore government agency that oversees 22 research institutes, consortia and centers, are establishing a major research center in Singapore. The Advanced Digital Sciences Center will be focused on breakthrough innovations in information technology that are expected to have a major impact in transforming human beings' utilization of information technology.

  • Six professors at Illinois elected as 2005 AAAS Fellows

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Six faculty members of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been awarded the distinction of AAAS Fellow by the American Association for the Advancement of Science: David F. Clayton, Evan H. DeLucia, Dana D. Dlott, Ravishankar K. Iyer, Deborah E. Leckband and Lawrence B. Schook.

  • Five Illinois professors elected as 2003 AAAS Fellows

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Five University of Illinois researchers - Ilesanmi Adesida, Craig M. Bethke, Keh-Yung (Norman) Cheng, Jeffrey S. Moore and Robert J. Novak - are among 348 scientists elected as 2003 fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  • Ten professors at Illinois elected as 2006 Fellows

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Ten faculty members of the University of Illinois at

  • New instrumentation helps scientists better predict space weather

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - New instrumentation and observing techniques, being developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, are helping scientists better understand and predict space weather.

  • Huang elected to Chinese Academy of Engineering

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Thomas S. Huang, the William L. Everitt Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been elected a Foreign Member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering.

  • Super-star clusters may be born small and grow by coalescing

  • Illinois mathematician elected fellow of AAAS

    CHAMPAIGN,Ill. - A University of Illinois mathematician has been elected a 2011 Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  • How automobile use can indicate obesity rates in the U.S.

    A Minute With™... computer science professor Sheldon H. Jacobson and graduate student Douglas M. King

  • Hidden order found in cuprates may help explain superconductivity

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Like the delicate form of an icicle defying gravity during a spring thaw, patterns emerge in nature when forces compete. Scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have found a hidden pattern in cuprate (copper-containing) superconductors that may help explain high-temperature superconductivity.

  • National Science Olympiad to take place May 20-21 at Illinois

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - About 2,400 students in middle school and high school are expected to compete in the 21st annual National Science Olympiad May 20-21 at the University of Illinois. The students, representing more than 120 teams of champions from across the country, will compete in more than three dozen events, such as bridge building, computing, chemistry and astronomy.

  • Three professors named fellows of American Association for the Advancement of Science

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Three University of Illinois researchers - Robert M. Fossum, Hugh M. Robertson and Peter G. Wolynes - are among 283 scientists who will be recognized Feb. 19 (Saturday) as new fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science during the association's annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

  • High-intensity ultrasound creates hollow nanospheres and nanocrystals

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Using high-intensity ultrasound, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have created hollow nanospheres and the first hollow nanocrystals. The nanospheres could be used in microelectronics, drug delivery and as catalysts for making environmentally friendly fuels.

  • Nanoparticles create biocompatible capsules

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - An innovative strategy of mixing lipids and nanoparticles to produce new drug and agricultural materials and delivery vehicles has been developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  • Is the so-called 'gyroball' just hype?

    A Minute With™... Alan Nathan is a professor of physics whose specialties

  • Molecular motors cooperate in moving cellular cargo, study shows

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Researchers using an extremely fast and accurate imaging technique have shed light on the tiny movements of molecular motors that shuttle material within living cells. The motors cooperate in a delicate choreography of steps, rather than engaging in the brute-force tug of war many scientists had imagined.

  • Looking at new U.S. nuke policies and the treaty with Russia

    A Minute With™... Jeremiah Sullivan, a professor emeritus of physics

  • Researchers study signaling networks that set up genetic code

    In a new study, researchers at the University of Illinois have identified and visualized the signaling pathways in protein-RNA complexes that help set the genetic code in all organisms. The genetic code allows information stored in DNA to be translated into proteins.

  • Illinois professor to receive $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Nick Holonyak Jr., a John Bardeen Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been selected as the 2004 recipient of the $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize - the world's largest single cash prize for invention.

  • Three Illinois professors elected to National Academy of Sciences

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Three University of Illinois faculty members are among the 72 scientists elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences in recognition of distinguished research and continuing achievements, the academy announced today.

  • New center will simulate plasma-controlled combustion

    The U. of I. will receive $16 million to fund a center focused on extreme-scale computing to predict how plasmas could be used to control combustion. The research may pave the way for cleaner-burning combustors and more reliable and higher performance jet engines.

  • Scientists identify gene involved in stem cell self-renewal in planarians

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - No matter how you slice it, the freshwater planarian possesses an amazing ability to regenerate lost body parts. Chop one into pieces, and each piece can grow into a complete planarian. The flatworm relies upon a population of stem cells to accomplish this remarkable feat; recent work sheds light on how planarians maintain these stem cells throughout their lives.

  • New center at Illinois will examine how to safeguard nation's power grid

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will be the home of a national center that will address the challenge of how to protect the nation's power grid, the National Science Foundation announced today. The NSF has awarded $7.5 million over five years to the project, which will be led by the U. of I. and also involve researchers at Cornell University, Dartmouth College, and Washington State University. The Department of Energy and the Department of Homeland Security have pledged to join NSF in funding and managing the effort.

  • Climate scientist to deliver lecture in series honoring his father

    CHAMPAIGN,Ill. - Ralph Keeling, a climate scientist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, will deliver the annual lecture that honors his father, the late Charles David Keeling, who was an analytical chemist at the University of Illinois and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

  • Nanowire generates power by harvesting energy from the environment

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - As the sizes of sensor networks and mobile devices shrink toward the microscale, and even nanoscale, there is a growing need for suitable power sources. Because even the tiniest battery is too big to be used in nanoscale devices, scientists are exploring nanosize systems that can salvage energy from the environment.

  • Explosive growth of file-sharing groups not sure sign of success, scholar says

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Online file-sharing communities have experienced explosive growth in recent years. YouTube, started in May 2005 so that people could share and download videos, now attracts 100 million visitors a day, while Gnutella and Kazaa, for music sharing, are attracting users at an increasing pace.

  • National Science Foundation funds new nanoscale research center at Illinois

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has received a grant from the National Science Foundation to create a nanoscale science and engineering center with an emphasis on nanomanufacturing. The grant will provide $12.5 million in funding over five years, with the possibility of a five-year renewal.

  • Low-cost climate-change insurance could help ensure better future

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Doing a little now to mitigate long-term climate change would cost much less than doing nothing and making an adjustment in the future, say scientists whose paper appears in the Oct. 15 issue of the journal Science.

  • Proofreading and error-correction in nanomaterials inspired by nature

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Mimicking nature, a procedure developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign can find and correct defects in self-assembled nanomaterials. The new proofreading and error-removal process is based on catalytic DNA and represents a paradigm shift in nanoscale science and engineering.

  • New surface chemistry may extend life of technology for making transistors

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a technique that uses surface chemistry to make tinier and more effective p-n junctions in silicon-based semiconductors. The method could permit the semiconductor industry to significantly extend the life of current ion-implantation technology for making transistors, thereby avoiding the implementation of difficult and costly alternatives.

  • Home computers to help researchers better understand universe

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Want to help unravel the mysteries of the universe? A new distributed computing project designed by a University of Illinois researcher allows people around the world to participate in cutting-edge cosmology research by donating their unused computing cycles.

  • Eleven professors at Illinois elected as 2007 AAAS Fellows

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Eleven faculty members of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been awarded the distinction of AAAS Fellow by the American Association for the Advancement of Science: Mark B. David, John A. Gerlt, Gregory S. Girolami, Steven C. Huber, Stephen P. Long, Yi Lu, Ken N. Paige, Edmund G. Seebauer, Scott K. Silverman, Gregory Timp and Donald J. Wuebbles.

  • AAAS Fellows elected

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Four University of Illinois researchers Paul D. Coleman, Richard I. Gumport, Jean-Pierre Leburton and Bruce R. Schatz are among 288 scientists elected as 2001 fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.