blog navigation

Physical Sciences

blog posts

  • Boppart named one of the world's top young innovators by Technology Review

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Stephen A. Boppart, a professor of electrical and computer engineering and of bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been chosen as one of the world's 100 Top Young Innovators by Technology Review, the world's oldest technology magazine.

  • Nation remains vulnerable to power blackouts, thanks to political impasse

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - As the peak electricity season approaches, little has been done in Washington to prevent a recurrence of last August's power failure that produced a huge blackout in the Northeast, an expert at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign says.

  • Superconducting nanowires show ability to measure magnetic fields

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - By using DNA molecules as scaffolds, scientists have created superconducting nanodevices that demonstrate a new type of quantum interference and could be used to measure magnetic fields and map regions of superconductivity.

  • New center will simulate plasma-controlled combustion

    The U. of I. will receive $16 million to fund a center focused on extreme-scale computing to predict how plasmas could be used to control combustion. The research may pave the way for cleaner-burning combustors and more reliable and higher performance jet engines.

  • Three Illinois researchers receive Presidential Early Career Awards

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Three researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign were among 56 young researchers named as recipients of the 2005 Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on young professionals at the outset of their independent research careers.

  • Asymmetric feature shows puzzling face for superconductivity

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The weird behavior of electrons tunneling across an atomically flat interface within a cuprate superconductor has defied explanation by theories of high-temperature superconductivity.

  • Evolutionary software to be released free of charge

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - New software developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign allows scientists to more effectively analyze and compare both sequence and structure data from a growing library of proteins and nucleic acids.

  • Scientist honored by French university for research on Earth's mantle

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Jay D. Bass, a professor of geology and of materials science at the University of Illinois, has been awarded an honorary doctorate by the University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 in France.

  • Researchers set new record for brightness of quantum dots

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - By placing quantum dots on a specially designed photonic crystal, researchers at the University of Illinois have demonstrated enhanced fluorescence intensity by a factor of up to 108. Potential applications include high-brightness light-emitting diodes, optical switches and personalized, high-sensitivity biosensors.

  • Polarized particles join toolbox for building unique structures

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have created polarized, spherical particles that spontaneously self-assemble into clusters with specific shapes and distributions of electric charge. The polarized particles can be used in the directional self-assembly of intricate shapes and unique structures.

  • Carbon sequestration policy must balance private property, public good

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The lack of a settled legal framework that balances private property rights while maximizing the public good ultimately hinders the large-scale commercial deployment of geologic carbon sequestration, according to published research by a University of Illinois expert in renewable energy law.

  • U. of I., Singapore establishing information technology center

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Agency for Science, Technology and Research, or A*STAR, a Singapore government agency that oversees 22 research institutes, consortia and centers, are establishing a major research center in Singapore. The Advanced Digital Sciences Center will be focused on breakthrough innovations in information technology that are expected to have a major impact in transforming human beings' utilization of information technology.

  • Eleven professors at Illinois elected as 2007 AAAS Fellows

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Eleven faculty members of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been awarded the distinction of AAAS Fellow by the American Association for the Advancement of Science: Mark B. David, John A. Gerlt, Gregory S. Girolami, Steven C. Huber, Stephen P. Long, Yi Lu, Ken N. Paige, Edmund G. Seebauer, Scott K. Silverman, Gregory Timp and Donald J. Wuebbles.

  • Microbial transport at Yellowstone: by land, sea or air?

  • Goal of project is development of petroleum-free fuel

    Developing a petroleum-free fuel from corn byproducts is one of the goals of a newly funded research project at the UI. Eight research laboratories will pool their expertise, attacking the problems from different directions in order to work to improve the efficiency of bioconversion of plant fibers into fuels and other value-added products.

  • Holonyak to receive institute's highest honor

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Nick Holonyak Jr., a John Bardeen Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has been selected as the 2003 recipient of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Medal of Honor.

  • Portable sampling cart monitors emissions from wood-burning cookstoves

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - A new method of measuring emissions from cookstoves could help improve human health and enhance the accuracy of global climate models.

  • Are there still holes in aviation security, ten years after 9/11?

    A Minute With™... computer science professor Sheldon H. Jacobson

     

  • Illinois mathematician elected fellow of AAAS

    CHAMPAIGN,Ill. - A University of Illinois mathematician has been elected a 2011 Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  • Puzzling height of polar clouds linked to solar radiation

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Scientists have discovered why polar mesospheric clouds over the South Pole are nearly two miles higher than those over the North Pole. A variation in solar radiation - a result of Earth's elliptical orbit - is responsible, they say.

  • Two University of Illinois faculty members earn 2010 Sloan Fellowships

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Two University of Illinois faculty members have been selected to receive 2010 Sloan Research Fellowships from the Alfred P. Sloan foundation: Yann R. Chemla, a professor of physics, and Karrie Karahalios, a professor of computer science.

  • Three U. of I. faculty members selected as 2012 Sloan Fellows

    CHAMPAIGN,Ill. - Three University of Illinois professors have each been selected to receive a 2012 Sloan Research Fellowship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

  • Two researchers elected to the National Academy of Engineering

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Two University of Illinois researchers -- Karl Hess and Thomas S. Huang -- have been elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering.

  • Nanoparticles create biocompatible capsules

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - An innovative strategy of mixing lipids and nanoparticles to produce new drug and agricultural materials and delivery vehicles has been developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  • European modernism and information society focus of U. of I. conference

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Scholars representing disciplines as diverse as architecture, urban planning, science, technology, cultural studies and library and information science - will gather May 6-8 at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign for a conference on "European Modernism and the Information Society: Informing the Present, Understanding the Past."

  • Illinois professor to receive global energy prize

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Nick Holonyak Jr., a John Bardeen Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been selected as a 2003 recipient of the Global Energy Prize from Russia. He shares the $900,000 prize with Gennady Mesiats of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Yan Douglas Smith of Titan Pulse Sciences Division.

  • Professor receives Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers at White House

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Charles F. Gammie, a professor of physics and of astronomy at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, was among 60 young researchers named as recipients of the 2001 Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the government on young professionals at the outset of their independent research careers. Gammie received his award July 12 in a White House ceremony.

  • UI instructor tweets at final space shuttle launch

    When it comes to science, Joanne Manaster admittedly inspires easily.

  • Quantum analog of Ulam's conjecture can guide molecules, reactions

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Like navigating spacecraft through the solar system by means of gravity and small propulsive bursts, researchers can guide atoms, molecules and chemical reactions by utilizing the forces that bind nuclei and electrons into molecules (analogous to gravity) and by using light for propulsion. But, knowing the minimal amount of light required, and how that amount changes with the complexity of the molecule, has been a problem.

  • Climate scientist to deliver lecture in series honoring his father

    CHAMPAIGN,Ill. - Ralph Keeling, a climate scientist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, will deliver the annual lecture that honors his father, the late Charles David Keeling, who was an analytical chemist at the University of Illinois and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

  • Nanowire generates power by harvesting energy from the environment

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - As the sizes of sensor networks and mobile devices shrink toward the microscale, and even nanoscale, there is a growing need for suitable power sources. Because even the tiniest battery is too big to be used in nanoscale devices, scientists are exploring nanosize systems that can salvage energy from the environment.

  • Illinois professor wins Packard Fellowship

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Scott K. Silverman, a professor of chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is among 16 U.S. researchers named 2003 Packard Fellows in natural sciences by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. He will receive $625,000 during the next five years to enhance his research efforts.

  • Six professors at Illinois elected as 2005 AAAS Fellows

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Six faculty members of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been awarded the distinction of AAAS Fellow by the American Association for the Advancement of Science: David F. Clayton, Evan H. DeLucia, Dana D. Dlott, Ravishankar K. Iyer, Deborah E. Leckband and Lawrence B. Schook.

  • Five Illinois professors elected as 2003 AAAS Fellows

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Five University of Illinois researchers - Ilesanmi Adesida, Craig M. Bethke, Keh-Yung (Norman) Cheng, Jeffrey S. Moore and Robert J. Novak - are among 348 scientists elected as 2003 fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  • Ten professors at Illinois elected as 2006 Fellows

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Ten faculty members of the University of Illinois at

  • New instrumentation helps scientists better predict space weather

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - New instrumentation and observing techniques, being developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, are helping scientists better understand and predict space weather.

  • Huang elected to Chinese Academy of Engineering

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Thomas S. Huang, the William L. Everitt Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been elected a Foreign Member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering.

  • Super-star clusters may be born small and grow by coalescing

  • Hidden order found in cuprates may help explain superconductivity

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Like the delicate form of an icicle defying gravity during a spring thaw, patterns emerge in nature when forces compete. Scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have found a hidden pattern in cuprate (copper-containing) superconductors that may help explain high-temperature superconductivity.

  • Three professors named fellows of American Association for the Advancement of Science

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Three University of Illinois researchers - Robert M. Fossum, Hugh M. Robertson and Peter G. Wolynes - are among 283 scientists who will be recognized Feb. 19 (Saturday) as new fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science during the association's annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

  • High-intensity ultrasound creates hollow nanospheres and nanocrystals

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Using high-intensity ultrasound, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have created hollow nanospheres and the first hollow nanocrystals. The nanospheres could be used in microelectronics, drug delivery and as catalysts for making environmentally friendly fuels.

  • State finals of Illinois Science Olympiad to be held April 6

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. The state finals of the Illinois Science Olympiad will be held April 6 at the University of Illinois. The event, which begins at 9 a.m., is part of a national competition in which middle and high school students compete in 24 events involving science concepts and engineering skills. The public is invited to attend.

  • Is the so-called 'gyroball' just hype?

    A Minute With™... Alan Nathan is a professor of physics whose specialties

  • Molecular motors cooperate in moving cellular cargo, study shows

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Researchers using an extremely fast and accurate imaging technique have shed light on the tiny movements of molecular motors that shuttle material within living cells. The motors cooperate in a delicate choreography of steps, rather than engaging in the brute-force tug of war many scientists had imagined.

  • Looking at new U.S. nuke policies and the treaty with Russia

    A Minute With™... Jeremiah Sullivan, a professor emeritus of physics

  • Researchers study signaling networks that set up genetic code

    In a new study, researchers at the University of Illinois have identified and visualized the signaling pathways in protein-RNA complexes that help set the genetic code in all organisms. The genetic code allows information stored in DNA to be translated into proteins.

  • Illinois professor to chair Council for Chemical Research

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Gregory S. Girolami, a professor of chemistry at the University of Illinois, has been elected chair of the Council for Chemical Research. He will serve two years as a vice chair, and then assume leadership of the organization in 2009.

  • Three Illinois professors elected to National Academy of Sciences

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Three University of Illinois faculty members are among the 72 scientists elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences in recognition of distinguished research and continuing achievements, the academy announced today.

  • Harry Drickamer. pioneer in pressure tuning studies dies

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Harry G. Drickamer, a pioneer in the field of pressure tuning studies, which led to advances in the study of molecular, atomic and electronic properties, died Monday (May 6) at Carle Foundation Hospital in Urbana, Ill. He was 83 years old.

  • Why reducing black carbon is an essential - and relatively easy - first step in the fight against global warming

    A Minute With™... civil and environmental engineering professor Tami Bond