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  • Corn better used as food than biofuel, study finds

    Corn is grown not only for food, it is also an important renewable energy source. Renewable biofuels can come with hidden economic and environmental issues, and the question of whether corn is better utilized as food or as a biofuel has persisted since ethanol came into use. For the first time, researchers at the University of Illinois have quantified and compared these issues in terms of economics of the entire production system to determine if the benefits of biofuel corn outweigh the costs.

  • Cradle turns smartphone into handheld biosensor

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Researchers and physicians in the field could soon run on-the-spot tests for environmental toxins, medical diagnostics, food safety and more with their smartphones.

  • Cystic fibrosis patients may breathe easier, thanks to bioengineered antimicrobials

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - By better understanding how antimicrobials bind and thereby get inactivated in the mucus of air passages, researchers at the University of Illinois may have found a way to help cystic fibrosis patients fight off deadly infections.

  • DARPA funds new photonic research center at Illinois

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has received a grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to create a photonic research center to develop ultra-fast light sources for high-speed signal processing and optical communications systems. The grant will provide $6.2 million in funding over four years.

  • Deluge of scientific data needs to be curated for long-term use

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - With the world awash in information, curating all the scientifically relevant bits and bytes is an important task, especially given digital data's increasing importance as the raw materials for new scientific discoveries, an expert in information science at the University of Illinois says.

  • Department head David Daniel to be next dean of engineering

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- David E. Daniel, the head of the department of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been chosen to be the next dean of the College of Engineering, pending approval of the UI Board of Trustees at its meeting today in Urbana.

  • Designer enzyme conquers sulfite reduction, a bottleneck in environmental cleanup

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Researchers have cleared one hurdle toward environmental cleanup of certain contaminants with a newly designed synthetic enzyme that reduces the compound sulfite to sulfide – a notoriously complex multistep chemical reaction that has eluded chemists for years.

  • Detection of DNA on nanotubes offers new sensing, sequencing technologies

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who recently reported that DNA-wrapped carbon nanotubes could serve as sensors in living cells now say the tiny tubes can be used to target specific DNA sequences. Potential applications for the new sensors range from rapid detection of hazardous biological agents to simpler and more efficient forensic identification.

  • Diagnostic tool helps engineers to design better global infrastructure solutions

    Designing safe bridges and water systems for low-income communities is not always easy for engineers coming from highly industrialized places. A new discipline called contextual engineering helps engineers think beyond personal values, expectations and definitions of project success when tackling global infrastructure problems.

  • Digital fingerprints could combat multimedia piracy

    While police use fingerprints to determine who stole a piece of property or handled a murder weapon, engineers may soon be able to use digital fingerprints to determine who pirated a multimedia file.

  • Dislocation creates 'whirlpool' that pulls surface atoms into crystal

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Developing novel ways to control the motion of atoms on surfaces is essential for the future of nanotechnology. Now, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have found a phenomenon of dislocation-driven nucleation and growth that creates holes that spiral into a surface and pull atoms into crystalline solids.

  • Disposable sensor uses DNA to detect hazardous uranium ions

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a simple, disposable sensor for detecting hazardous uranium ions, with sensitivity that rivals the performance of much more sophisticated laboratory instruments.

  • Distinguished Berkeley astronomer to present public talk

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- William J. Welch, a professor of electrical engineering and of astronomy at the University of California at Berkeley, will present the fifth talk in the department of astronomy's Icko Iben Jr. Distinguished Lectureship at 4 p.m. Oct. 28 in Foellinger Auditorium, 709 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana. The talk, "The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence," is free and open to the public.

  • Distinguished Cal-Tech astronomer to present public talk

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Wallace L.W. Sargent, the Ira S. Bowen Professor of Astronomy at the California Institute of Technology, will present the fourth talk in the department of astronomys Icko Iben Jr. Distinguished Lectureship at 4 p.m. April 24 in Foellinger Auditorium, 709 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana. The talk, "Large Optical Telescopes: The Next Generation," is free and open to the public.

  • Distinguished German astrophysicist to present public talk

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Reinhard Genzel, director of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching, Germany, will discuss black holes during a talk Nov. 17 at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  • Distinguished NASA scientist to present public talk

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - David Morrison, a senior scientist at the NASA Astrobiology Institute, will present the sixth talk in the department of astronomy's Icko Iben Jr. Distinguished Lectureship at 4 p.m. Nov. 5 in Foellinger Auditorium, 709 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana. The talk, "Cosmic Collisions: How Astronomers are Saving the World," is free and open to the public.

  • Ditch the gadgets while driving in Memorial Day weekend traffic

    A Minute With™... computer science professor Sheldon H. Jacobson

  • DNA catalysts do the work of protein enzymes

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Illinois chemists have used DNA to do a protein's job, creating opportunities for DNA to find work in more areas of biology, chemistry and medicine than ever before.

  • DNA constraints control structure of attached macromolecules

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - A new method for manipulating macromolecules has been developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The technique uses double-stranded DNA to direct the behavior of other molecules.

  • DNA enzyme shuffles cell membranes a thousand times faster than its natural counterpart

    A new synthetic enzyme, crafted from DNA rather than protein, flips lipid molecules within the cell membrane, triggering a signal pathway that could be harnessed to induce cell death in cancer cells. It is the first such synthetic enzyme to outperform its natural counterparts.

  • DNA molecules directly interact with each other based on sequence, study finds

    Proteins play a large role in DNA regulation, but a new study finds that DNA molecules directly interact with one another in a way that’s dependent on the sequence of the DNA and epigenetic factors. This could have implications for how DNA is organized in the cell and even how genes are regulated in different cell types, the researchers say.

  • DNA-wrapped carbon nanotubes serve as sensors in living cells

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Single walled carbon nanotubes wrapped with DNA can be placed inside living cells and detect trace amounts of harmful contaminants using near infrared light, report researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Their discovery opens the door to new types of optical sensors and biomarkers that exploit the unique properties of nanoparticles in living systems.

  • Don't let more frequent tornado warnings lull you into complacency

    A Minute With™... Ed Kieser, the chief meteorologist at WILL AM-FM-TV

  • Dual-function nanorod LEDs could make multifunctional displays

    Cellphones and other devices could soon be controlled with touchless gestures and charge themselves using ambient light, thanks to new LED arrays that can both emit and detect light.

  • Earth's core rotates faster than its crust, scientists say

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Scientists have ended a 9-year-old debate by proving that Earth's core rotates faster than its surface, by about 0.3 to 0.5 degree per year.

  • Earth's surprise inside: Geologists unlock mysteries of the planet's inner core

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Seismic waves are helping scientists to plumb the world's deepest mystery: the planet's inner core.

  • Ebert Symposium to feature IMAX film, astronaut videographer, storytelling with data

    The first Roger Ebert Symposium will explore the cinematic presentation of science with help from an IMAX film shot from space, a former astronaut and a diverse group of academics and experts.

  • Efforts to 'control' the Mississippi River and modern flooding

    A Minute With™... Marcelo Garcia, an expert in river hydrology

  • Eight Illinois faculty members elected fellows of AAAS

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Eight University of Illinois faculty members have been elected fellows in the American Association for the Advancement of Science: Fouad Abd-El-Khalick, Rashid Bashir, Debasish Dutta, K. Jimmy Hsia, Keith W. Kelley, Wilfred van der Donk, M. Christina White and James Whitfield.

  • Eight Illinois researchers rank among world’s most influential

    Eight University of Illinois researchers have been named to the Thomson Reuters / Clarivate Analytics Highly Cited Researchers list for 2016. The list identifies scientists “whose research has had significant global impact within their respective fields of study."

  • Elastic microspheres expand understanding of embryonic development and cancer cells

    A new technique that uses tiny elastic balls filled with fluorescent nanoparticles aims to expand the understanding of the mechanical forces that exist between cells, researchers report. A University of Illinois-led team has demonstrated the quantification of 3-D forces within cells living in petri dishes as well as live specimens. This research may unlock some of the mysteries related to embryonic development and cancer stem cells, i.e., tumor-repopulating cells.

  • Electronic device performance enhanced with new transistor encasing method

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - A more effective method for closing gaps in atomically small wires has been developed by University of Illinois researchers, further opening the doors to a new transistor technology.

  • Electrons are not enough: Cuprate superconductors defy convention

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - To engineers, it's a tale as old as time: Electrical current is carried through materials by flowing electrons. But physicists at the University of Illinois and the University of Pennsylvania found that for copper-containing superconductors, known as cuprates, electrons are not enough to carry the current.

  • Electroplating delivers high-energy, high-power batteries

    The process that makes gold-plated jewelry or chrome car accents is now making powerful lithium-ion batteries.

  • Electrostatic force takes charge in bioinspired polymers

    Researchers at the University of Illinois and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst have taken the first steps toward gaining control over the self-assembly of synthetic materials in the same way that biology forms natural polymers. This advance could prove useful in designing new bioinspired, smart materials for applications ranging from drug delivery to sensing to remediation of environmental contaminants.

  • Eleven professors at Illinois elected as 2007 AAAS Fellows

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Eleven faculty members of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have been awarded the distinction of AAAS Fellow by the American Association for the Advancement of Science: Mark B. David, John A. Gerlt, Gregory S. Girolami, Steven C. Huber, Stephen P. Long, Yi Lu, Ken N. Paige, Edmund G. Seebauer, Scott K. Silverman, Gregory Timp and Donald J. Wuebbles.

  • Emeritus professor wins top honor from Materials Research Society

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Howard K. Birnbaum, a professor emeritus at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been selected as the 2002 recipient of the Von Hippel Award from the Materials Research Society. The award will be presented Dec. 4 at the MRS meeting in Boston.

  • 'Encyclopedia of Stars' aimed at anyone who enjoys astronomy

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - An astronomy expert looking for in-depth research about stars can consult the same new reference book that an undergraduate freshman with a limited knowledge of astronomy might use.

  • Engineered strategies to mitigate global warming could influence biosphere

  • Engineering could give reconstructive surgery a face-lift

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Facial reconstruction patients may soon have the option of custom-made bone replacements optimized for both form and function, thanks to researchers at the University of Illinois and the Ohio State University Medical Center.

  • Engineering Open House at Illinois highlights creativity

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Wild and wacky Rube Goldberg machines, robots launching mini basketballs, and more than 130 entertaining and educational exhibits are among the attractions awaiting visitors to the 85th annual Engineering Open House at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  • Engineering Open House highlights ingenuity

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Wild and wacky Rube Goldberg machines, robots fighting for possession of wooden blocks, and more than 120 fun-filled exhibits are among the attractions awaiting visitors to the 84th annual Engineering Open House at the University of Illinois.

  • Engineering Open House set for March 3, 4

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Remote-controlled robots rescuing "hostages" while running an obstacle course, wild and wacky Rube Goldberg machines, and more than 150 exhibits ranging from spacecraft design to shape-memory metals are among the attractions awaiting visitors to the 80th annual Engineering Open House at the University of Illinois.

  • Engineering Open House showcases student talent

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Wild and wacky Rube Goldberg machines, robots fighting for possession of helium balloons, and more than 130 fun-filled exhibits are among the attractions awaiting visitors to the 83rd annual Engineering Open House at the University of Illinois.

  • Engineering professor named Carnegie Scholar

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Michael Loui, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been named a Carnegie Scholar by the Carnegie Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

  • Engineers find way to evaluate green roofs

    Green infrastructure is an attractive concept, but there is concern surrounding its effectiveness. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using a mathematical technique traditionally used in earthquake engineering to determine how well green infrastructure works and to communicate with urban planners, policymakers and developers.

  • Engineers on a roll toward smaller, more efficient radio frequency transformers

    The future of electronic devices lies partly within the “internet of things” – the network of devices, vehicles and appliances embedded within electronics to enable connectivity and data exchange. University of Illinois engineers are helping realize this future by minimizing the size of one notoriously large element of integrated circuits used for wireless communication – the transformer.

  • Engineers roll up their sleeves - and then do same with inductors

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - On the road to smaller, high-performance electronics, University of Illinois researchers have smoothed one speed bump by shrinking a key, yet notoriously large element of integrated circuits.

  • Engineers shine light on deadly landslide

    A new report by University of Illinois civil and environmental engineering professor Tim Stark and colleagues details the factors that led to the deadliest landslide on record in the continental United States, along with steps that can be taken to mitigate landslide consequences and risk in the Pacific Northwest.

  • Etching holes in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers creates better beam

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. - Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have found a way to significantly improve the performance of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by drilling holes in their surfaces. Faster and cheaper long-haul optical communication systems, as well as photonic integrated circuits, could be the result.