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  • Artificial photosynthesis transforms carbon dioxide into liquefiable fuels

    Chemists at the University of Illinois have successfully produced fuels using water, carbon dioxide and visible light through artificial photosynthesis. By converting carbon dioxide into more complex molecules like propane, green energy technology is now one step closer to using excess CO2 to store solar energy – in the form of chemical bonds – for use when the sun is not shining and in times of peak demand.

  • Illinois student named Yenching Scholar at Peking University

    Gabriel Wacks is the first University of Illinois student accepted into Peking University’s Yenching Academy. Along with about 125 scholars from more than 40 countries, he will enroll this fall in an interdisciplinary master’s degree program in China studies.

  • Soils are warming and drying in mid-May

    After a cooling spell last weekend, soil temperatures are once again rising in Illinois, according to Jennie Atkins, Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring Program manager at the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

  • Polymers jump through hoops on pathway to sustainable materials

    Recyclable plastics that contain ring-shaped polymers may be a key to developing sustainable synthetic materials. Despite some promising advances, researchers said, a full understanding of how to processes ring polymers into practical materials remains elusive. In a new study, researchers identified a mechanism called “threading” that takes place when a polymer is stretched – a behavior not witnessed before. This new insight may lead to new processing methods for sustainable polymer materials.

  • Deaths

    Robert W. McCleary

  • U of I System transfers Research Park oversight to Urbana campus

    The University of Illinois Board of Trustees today transferred oversight of the University of Illinois Research Park from the U. of I. System to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  • Illinois student honored with Goldwater scholarship

    U. of I. student Philip Kocheril of Champaign was awarded a Barry M. Goldwater scholarship for the 2019-20 and 2020-21 academic years.

  • Media Advisory: Willard Airport hosts emergency drill Monday

    Emergency responders will take part in a full-scale emergency exercise at Willard Airport in Savoy on Monday, May 20, beginning at 6 p.m. The exercise will not affect scheduled air travel.

  • Perceived union support buoys 'meaningfulness of work' measures

    When employees think of their labor union as supportive and caring, says new research co-written by U. of I. labor professor M. Teresa Cardador, they are more likely to rate their union as fulfilling their psychological needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness – all of which are related to enhanced work meaningfulness.

  • Archivist discusses first African American chemistry PhD

    Illinois alumnus St. Elmo Brady was the first African American to obtain a doctorate in chemistry in the U.S. He received his degree in 1916 for work completed at Noyes Laboratory and continued his career as a professor of chemistry at historically black colleges and universities. Brady was recently honored for his accomplishment by the American Chemical Society through the designation of a national historic chemical landmark.

  • Receiving weekend food improves school attendance among children living with hunger

    Participating in a food-distribution program that provides children from food-insecure households with backpacks of meals for the weekend improves their school attendance on Fridays, a new study found.

  • Deaths

    Janice Lynn Allen ... Donald Chien-Tao Chiang ... Doris M. Downs ... Max Elmer Reid ... Helen Louise (Camp) Ridlen

  • 'Engineering Fire' documentary premieres on BTN

    “Engineering Fire,” 30-minute documentary video chronicling the work of University of Illinois engineers to introduce a solar-cooking device in Haiti, premieres May 12 at 7 p.m. CDT on the Big Ten Network.

  • Krannert Center for the Performing Arts announces 50th season of performances

    Krannert Center for the Performing Arts will present its 50th season of performances in 2019-20.

  • Illinois Fire Service Institute training showcase May 15

    The Office of the State Fire Marshal will host the Illinois Fire Service Institute Training Showcase on May 15 outside the Illinois state Capitol in Springfield. The event will provide state legislators with an in-depth look at the training efforts for firefighters taking place throughout the state.

  • What changes should be made to modernize consumer bankruptcy law?

    The primary reason why current bankruptcy law doesn’t work well is that it dates back to 1978, before the explosion of consumer credit, says Robert M. Lawless, the Max L. Rowe Professor of Law at Illinois and a leading consumer credit and bankruptcy expert. Lawless served as reporter for the American Bankruptcy Institute’s Commission on Consumer Bankruptcy, which recommended several changes to the law.

  • Three faculty members honored with Campus Awards for Excellence in Faculty Leadership

    The Office of the Provost honored three University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign faculty members May 7 with Campus Awards for Excellence in Faculty Leadership.

  • Emerging Contaminants in the Environment Conference is May 21-22

    The 2019 Emerging Contaminants in the Environment Conference is May 21-22 at the Hilton Garden Inn in Champaign. This year the conference will expand beyond the aquatic environment to include air and soil studies, along with the effects of contaminants on human and animal health.

  • Deaths

    Tom Battershell ... Jeannine W. Corlas ... Keith Randall Erickson ... Philip Clayton Mitchell ... Shirley J. Smith.

  • The Center for Advanced Study announces the Associates, Fellows and Beckman Fellows for 2019-20.

    The Center for Advanced Study announces the Associates, Fellows and Beckman Fellows for 2019-20.

  • April showers prompted continued flood concerns in Illinois

    A wet April extended the trend for above-average precipitation in Illinois. This year was the seventh-wettest December-to-April period on record, according to Brian Kerschner, a spokesperson for the Illinois State Climatologist Office at the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

  • Mechanics, chemistry and biomedical research join forces for noninvasive tissue therapy

    A fortuitous conversation between two University of Illinois scientists has opened a new line of communication between biomedical researchers and the tissues they study. The new findings, reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, show that high-intensity focused ultrasound waves can penetrate biological tissue to activate molecules able to perform specific tasks.

  • Researchers find protein that suppresses muscle repair in mice

    Researchers report that a protein known to be important to protein synthesis also influences muscle regeneration and regrowth in an unexpected manner. The discovery, reported in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, could one day lead to new methods for treating disorders that result in muscle weakness and loss of muscle mass, the researchers said.

  • Professor’s history of Coca-Cola also tells larger story of globalization

    Coca-Cola’s history is one of innovation in image-making, outsourcing and other now-common practices of global capitalism – and of adapting to challenges from activists and movements resisting its practices, says an Illinois professor in a new book.

  • Media advisory: Media passes for commencement available this week

    Members of the news media may pick up stadium passes and parking passes for commencement at the Office of Public Affairs, 507 E. Green St., Champaign. Commencement is Saturday, May 11, at 9:30 a.m.

     

  • Marijuana use among Illinois teens unchanged but 'cool factor' increasing, survey finds

    The number of Illinois high school seniors who think their peers perceive using marijuana as “cool” doubled – from 25% to 50% over the past decade, according to a new report from the latest Illinois Youth Survey.

  • Study examines impact of climate change on Louisiana’s Houma tribe

    Louisiana's Houma tribe are especially vulnerable to climate change, but mistrust fomented by overt discrimination and forcible relocation complicates efforts to help them adapt to it, new research suggests.

     

  • Chancellor's Distinguished Staff Award honors eight employees

    The Chancellor’s Distinguished Staff Award honors eight civil service staff employees for exceptional performance.

  • Long elected to National Academy of Sciences

    Stephen P. Long, a professor of crop sciences and plant biology at the University of Illinois, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest professional honors a scientist can receive.

  • ELLNORA guitar festival features influential guitarists from around the world

    ELLNORA: The Guitar Festival will feature a wide variety of musicians Sept. 5-7 at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts.

  • Excessive rainfall as damaging to corn yield as extreme heat, drought

    Recent flooding in the Midwest has brought attention to the complex agricultural problems associated with too much rain. Data from the past three decades suggest that excessive rainfall can affect crop yield as much as excessive heat and drought. In a new study, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Illinois linked crop insurance, climate, soil and corn yield data from 1981 through 2016.

  • Study: Mindfulness may help decrease stress in caregivers of veterans

    Mindfulness therapy may be an effective way of mitigating the stress experienced by spouses and other informal caregivers for military veterans, a new study by researchers at the University of Illinois suggests.

  • U. of I. earns Bronze Level EMS Ready Campus status

    Illini Emergency Medical Services, a program of the Illinois Fire Service Institute that provides nontransport care to the 58,000 students, staff and faculty members at the Urbana-Champaign campus, was recognized as a Bronze Level EMS Ready Campus at the annual conference of the National Collegiate Emergency Medical Services Foundation.

  • Study: I-Promise grants boost low-income U. of I. students’ graduation rates

    Freshmen from low-income families who received Illinois Promise loan-replacement grants at the University of Illinois were significantly more likely to graduate within five years, a new study found.

  • Volunteers needed for Dump & Run collections starting May 6

    The University YMCA is seeking volunteers and donations for its 18th annual Dump & Run recycling program. Collections during the May period of Dump & Run will be held exclusively at the Stock Pavilion, 1402 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Urbana, because the MCORE construction project limits access to  the University YMCA building on Wright Street.

  • Nigh named Office Professional of the Year

    Penny Nigh, an administrative aide and assistant to Executive Associate Chancellor for Administration and University Relations Wanda E. Ward, was honored by the Illinois Administrative Professional at the University of Illinois (formerly The Secretariat) with the 2019 Office Professional of the Year Award.

  • Injections, exercise promote muscle regrowth after atrophy in mice, study finds

    By injecting cells that support blood vessel growth into muscles depleted by inactivity, researchers say they are able to help restore muscle mass lost as a result of immobility.

  • Deaths

    Louis H. “Bud” Mesker ... Darcy Elizabeth Strack

  • Scholars: Estimates of food insecurity among college students problematic

    A good estimate of how many college students struggle with food insecurity is a difficult number to pin down, says new research from a team of University of Illinois experts who study food choice issues.

  • Illinois music professor awarded Carnegie Fellowship

    Illinois ethnomusicologist Michael Silvers, who specializes in the music of Brazil, has been awarded a 2019 Andrew Carnegie Fellowship. He’ll use the fellowship to research a book that will examine the aesthetics and natural resources of instrument-making using Brazilian woods.

  • Krannert Center for the Performing Arts announces 2019-20 Youth Series

    Since 1982, thousands of young people have experienced the performing arts at Krannert Center for the Performing Arts by attending creative daytime programs. These performances are designed to invigorate students’ imaginations while also addressing Common Core and Illinois learning standards.

  • How does sexual harassment affect young women in physics?

    In a study reported in the journal Physical Review Physics Education Research, nearly 75% of 471 undergraduate women in physics who responded to a survey offered during a professional conference reported having experienced at least one type of sexual harassment – mostly gender harassment – in their field. U. of I. anthropology professor Kathryn Clancy, a co-author of the report, talked to News Bureau life sciences editor Diana Yates about the study, which also examined the respondents’ feelings of belonging and legitimacy as scientists and scholars.

  • Lyric Theatre's 'Crazy For You' production blends tap, Gershwin tunes

    The Lyric Theatre @ Illinois spring musical features tap dancing and Gershwin tunes in “Crazy for You.”

  • IPRH bringing poet Claudia Rankine to campus for reading

    Award-winning poet Claudia Rankine will visit the University of Illinois this week to give a reading and meet with students.

  • Study: Drugs reprogram genes in breast tumors to prevent endocrine resistance

    Treating breast tumors with two cancer drugs simultaneously may prevent endocrine resistance by attacking the disease along separate gene pathways, University of Illinois scientists found in a new study.

  • Deaths

    Ronald L. Miner ... Charles Edward Olson ... James H. Wyatt Sr.

     

  • Multistep self-assembly opens door to new reconfigurable materials

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Self-assembling synthetic materials come together when tiny, uniform building blocks interact and form a structure. However, nature lets materials like proteins of varying size and shape assemble, allowing for complex architectures that can handle multiple tasks.

     

  • What was lost in the Notre Dame Cathedral fire?

    Notre Dame Cathedral, severely damaged by fire this week, is widely understood as “the beating heart of France,” with global significance beyond that, says one University of Illinois historian in a Q&A. Another notes how a key aspect of music as we know it today was invented for the cathedral’s unique resonant space, a soundscape lost in the fire.

  • Study: Reducing energy required to convert CO2 waste into valuable resources

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Surplus industrial carbon dioxide creates an opportunity to convert waste into a valuable commodity. Excess CO2 can be a feedstock for chemicals typically derived from fossil fuels, but the process is energy-intensive and expensive. University of Illinois chemical engineers have assessed the technical and economic feasibility of a new electrolysis technology that uses a cheap biofuel byproduct to reduce the energy consumption of the waste-to-value process by 53 percent.

  • Illinois chancellor and chemist elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

    Chancellor Robert J. Jones and chemistry professor Catherine J. Murphy have been elected as members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.