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Three professors named fellows of American Association for the Advancement of Science

James E. Kloeppel, Physical Sciences Editor
(217) 244-1073; kloeppel@illinois.edu


2/16/2000
 
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Three University of Illinois researchers – Robert M. Fossum, Hugh M. Robertson and Peter G. Wolynes – are among 283 scientists who will be recognized Feb. 19 (Saturday) as new fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science during the association’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

Fellowship recognizes “efforts toward advancing science or fostering applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished,” according to the association.  With more than 143,000 members, the AAAS is the world’s largest general science organization.  The association, which was founded in 1848, publishes the weekly journal Science and has been naming fellows since 1874.

Fossum, a professor of mathematics, is being recognized for his continued contributions to ring theory and for more than 15 years of outstanding service as secretary of the American Mathematical Society.  He earned his bachelor’s degree in mathematics in 1959 from St. Olaf College and his doctorate in mathematics in 1965 from the University of Michigan.  Fossum joined the U. of I. faculty in 1964 and has written more than 40 papers in professional journals.

Robertson, a professor of entomology, is being honored for performing pioneering research in molecular evolution and for making important discoveries on the horizontal transfer of transposons between extremely distantly related species.  He earned his bachelor’s degree in zoology and biochemistry in 1976 from the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa, and his doctorate in zoology in 1982, also from the University of the Witwatersrand.  Robertson joined the U. of I. faculty in 1987 and has written more than 50 journal articles.

Wolynes, a professor of chemistry, of physics, and of biophysics, is being recognized for his fundamental studies of chemical physics, including reaction dynamics, the glass transition and protein folding.  He earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry in 1971 from Indiana University and his doctorate in chemical physics in 1976 from Harvard University.  Wolynes joined the U. of I. faculty in 1980 and holds the James R. Eiszner Chair in chemistry.  He has written more than 210 journal articles.