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  • Illinois choreographer Abby Zbikowski garnering attention, honors

    The highly physical choreography of University of Illinois dance professor Abby Zbikowski has earned her a 2017 Juried Bessie Award and recognition in the dance world.

  • Illinois history professor to speak following Sunday, Aug. 20, screening of ‘Dunkirk’ at Virginia Theatre

    John A. Lynn II, a professor emeritus of history at Illinois, will give a talk and answer questions covering the events depicted in the film “Dunkirk” immediately following the 1 p.m. screening Aug. 20 at the Virginia Theatre, 203 W. Park Ave., Champaign.

     

  • How do employers combat a resurgent white supremacy movement?

    Labor and employment relations professor Michael LeRoy discusses his research about confronting a resurgent white supremacy movement.

  • Bashir named executive associate dean of Carle Illinois College of Medicine

    The Carle Illinois College of Medicine has appointed a permanent executive associate dean: Rashid Bashir, a professor and the department head of bioengineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

  • Urbana campus consolidates to single logo

    Academic and administrative units at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will go back to the familiar orange block “I” logo, retiring the column “I” they have used since 1997.

  • Paper examines links between parents’ earnings, gender roles, mental health

    New research out of the University of Illinois suggests that some mothers’ and fathers’ psychological well-being may suffer when their work and family identities – and the amount of financial support they provide – conflict with conventional gender roles.

  • Deaths

    Barbara Ann Albin Brown ... Nancy Doris Chumbley ... Harvey Albert Hermann Jr. ... William “Bill” J. Kubitz ... Donald Eugene Senn 

     

  • July conditions in Illinois ranged from floods to drought

    Northern Illinois experienced heavy rain and widespread flooding in July. Meanwhile, parts of central and southern Illinois experienced dry weather that caused crop damage, according to Illinois State Climatologist Jim Angel of the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

    On average, however, the statewide precipitation was 4.81 inches, which is 0.73 inches above normal.

     

  • Taboo words’ impact mediated by context, listeners’ likelihood of being offended

    A new paper by University of Illinois scholars suggests that the physiological and psychological effects of profanity and other taboo words on people who read or hear them may be due largely – but not entirely – to the context and individual audience members’ likelihood of being offended.

  • Krannert Art Museum exhibition celebrates early images of nature, female artists

    A new exhibition at Krannert Art Museum celebrates images of nature, with an emphasis on female artists.

  • Increased risk of suicide, mental health conditions linked to sexual assault victimization

    An analysis of nearly 200 independent studies involving more than 230,000 adult participants finds that having been sexually assaulted is associated with significantly increased risk of anxiety, depression, suicidality, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance abuse, obsessive-compulsive disorder and bipolar disorder.

  • Restoring a lost heritage

  • New microscope technique reveals internal structure of live embryos

    University of Illinois researchers have developed a way to produce 3-D images of live embryos in cattle that could help determine embryo viability before in vitro fertilization in humans.

  • Deaths

    Barton Marshall Clark ... Julia Ann “Julie” Dawson ... Mary “Joan” Dawson ... L. Thomas Fredrickson ... Louine A. Friese ... Dorothy M. (Lee) “Meenah” Mapson ... Walter Emil Splittstoesser ...  Norma Jeanne Woolen

     

  • Media portrayals of pregnant women, new moms unrealistic, study says

    Media portrayals of pregnant and postpartum women tend to be unrealistic, and their focus on women's bodies may may be detrimental to women and their infants, suggests a new study by University of Illinois scholar Toni Liechty.

  • Lizard blizzard survivors tell story of natural selection

    An unusually cold winter in the U.S. in 2014 took a toll on the green anole lizard, a tree-dwelling creature common to the southeastern United States. A new study offers a rare view of natural selection in this species, showing how the lizard survivors at the southernmost part of their range in Texas came to be more like their cold-adapted counterparts further north.

  • Illinois historian receives NEH Public Scholar award, career prize for military history

    John Lynn, a professor emeritus of history at Illinois, has received a selective NEH Public Scholar award less than six months after receiving the highest career award in the field of military history.

  • Searching for an ancient Maya pilgrimage path: Fire and water

    It is our final day in the field and we are searching for the last of the ancient Maya ceremonial pools, Pool 25. Mud sucks at our boots as we wade through a jungle swamp. The sap from black poisonwood trees (Metopium brownie) burns our skin. Spike-covered trees snag us, while others swarm with ants. The grassland around this last pool should be a welcome relief.

    At the edge of the jungle, however, we are met with cutting grass, aptly named for its razor-sharp edges, rising well above our heads. The knee-deep water hides holes that catch us unaware.

  • Altgeld Chimes celebrated in video while chimes concerts on hiatus

    A new video celebrates the history of the Altgeld Chimes and the chimes players.

  • Cicada wings may inspire new surface technologies

    Researchers are looking to insects – specifically cicadas – for insight into the design of artificial surfaces with de-icing, self-cleaning and anti-fogging abilities. 

  • Chamber singers, laughter and schnitzel with music: A few of my favorite things

    Illinois Chamber Singers got a taste of Europe this summer.

  • Study finds parallels between unresponsive honey bees, autism in humans

    Honey bees that consistently fail to respond to obvious social cues share something fundamental with autistic humans, researchers report in a new study. Genes most closely associated with autism spectrum disorders in humans are regulated differently in unresponsive honey bees than in their more responsive nest mates, the study found.

  • States find rewards from high-tech investments, given time and patience

    State investments in high-tech development generally pay off, given time, patience and modest expections, according to a University of Illinois study.

  • Researchers look at lessons learned from disaster recovery around the world

    A new book by Robert Olshansky, the head of the University of Illinois department of urban and regional planning and an expert in post-disaster recovery, details the lessons learned from disaster recovery all over the world that can guide governments in better responding to a large disaster.

     

  • What can fans of 'Doctor Who' expect with a woman in the lead role?

    Lynne M. Thomas, the incoming head of the Illinois' Rare Book and Manuscript Library, says one thing has been consistent about 'Doctor Who' – it keeps changing with the times

  • Illinois alumnus and former faculty member named Social Work dean

    CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Steven Anderson, the director of the School of Social Work at Michigan State University, was named the dean of the School of Social Work at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign effective Sept. 16, pending approval by the University of Illinois Board of Trustees.

  • Can President Trump pardon himself?

    No provision of the Constitution prohibits it, but the threat of impeachment should function as a check on the president's clemency powers, said law professor Jason Mazzone

  • Deaths

    George Allen Bark ... Cyrus Johnson

     

     

  • Searching for an ancient Maya pilgrimage path: The elusive pools

    CARA BLANCA, Belize — Armed with a compass, a map, a GPS device and a drone, we begin our exploratory trek through the jungle. The thick vegetation is no match for our team of eight, six of whom are quick with a machete.  Four hours after circumventing towering hardwoods and hacking our way through spidery vines, massive palm fronds and dense fern bushes, we stand at the edge of Pool 21, less than a kilometer from the road.

  • University of Illinois alumna to head Rare Book and Manuscript Library

    Lynne M. Thomas, who earned her master’s degree in library and information sciences at the University of Illinois, has been selected as the new head of the U. of I. Rare Book and Manuscript Library.

  • Cognitive cross-training enhances learning, study finds

    Just as athletes cross-train to improve physical skills, those wanting to enhance cognitive skills can benefit from multiple ways of exercising the brain, according to a comprehensive new study from University of Illinois researchers.

  • Physical activity could combat fatigue, cognitive decline in cancer survivors

    A new study indicates that cancer patients and survivors have a ready weapon against fatigue and “chemo brain”: a brisk walk.

  • Lutein may counter cognitive aging, study finds

    Spinach and kale are favorites of those looking to stay physically fit, but they also could keep consumers cognitively fit, according to a new study from University of Illinois researchers.

  • Two undergrads improve plant carbon-cycle models

    In the summer of 2012, two undergraduate students tackled a problem that plant ecology experts had overlooked for 30 years. The students demonstrated that different plant species vary in how they take in carbon dioxide and emit water through stomata, the pores in their leaves. The data boosted the accuracy of mathematical models of carbon and water fluxes through plant leaves by 30 to 60 percent.

  • Strength of tectonic plates may explain shape of Tibetan Plateau, study finds

    Geoscientists have long puzzled over the mechanism that created the Tibetan Plateau, but a new study finds that the landform’s history may be controlled primarily by the strength of the tectonic plates whose collision prompted its uplift. Given that the region is one of the most seismically active areas in the world, understanding the plateau’s geologic history could give scientists insight to modern day earthquake activity.

     

  • Warm soils across Illinois in July

    Soil temperatures are above normal in mid-July, according to Jennie Atkins, the Water and Atmospheric Resources Monitoring program manager at the Illinois State Water Survey, part of the Prairie Research Institute at Illinois.

     

  • Deaths

    Bill D. Lazzell

  • Illinois information sciences professor edits book about trigger warnings

    Emily Knox, a professor in the University of Illinois School of Information Sciences, is the editor of a book that looks at the controversial topic of the use of trigger warnings in the classroom.

     

     

  • Political ideology and social norms can play a role in donation decisions, study says

    New research from U. of I. business professor and branding expert Carlos J. Torelli provides a more nuanced understanding of the role of political ideology and social norms on donation decisions.

  • Study: Supreme Court decision complicates prosecuting child abusers

    A Supreme Court decision that limits the types of statements that can be admitted as evidence unless the victim testifies in court discourages prosecutors from trying some child maltreatment cases, according to a recent national survey of more than 200 prosecutors.

  • Massive simulation shows HIV capsid interacting with its environment

    It took two years on a supercomputer to simulate 1.2 microseconds in the life of the HIV capsid, a protein cage that shuttles the HIV virus to the nucleus of a human cell. The 64-million-atom simulation offers new insights into how the virus senses its environment and completes its infective cycle.

  • Lecturer’s ‘Kindred’ adaptation selected as top pick by ICA Reads

    The Institute of Contemporary Art’s “artful book club,” ICA Reads, has selected “Kindred: A Graphic Novel Adaptation” as its 2017 pick for a book of critical and societal importance. A reinterpretation of Octavia E. Butler’s science-fiction masterpiece “Kindred,” the book was adapted by School of Information Sciences at Illinois alumnus and adjunct lecturer Damian Duffy and illustrated by John Jennings. A New York Times bestseller, the novel tells the story of a young black woman’s time-travel between her home in 1970s California and a plantation in the antebellum South.

  • Study: Omega-3 fatty acids fight inflammation via cannabinoids

    Chemical compounds called cannabinoids are found in marijuana and also are produced naturally in the body from omega-3 fatty acids. A well-known cannabinoid in marijuana, THC, is responsible for some of its euphoric effects, but it also has anti-inflammatory benefits. A new study in animal tissue reveals the cascade of chemical reactions that convert omega-3 fatty acids into cannabinoids that have anti-inflammatory benefits – but without the psychotropic high. 

  • Brief interactions spur lasting waves of gene activity in the brain

    A five-minute encounter with an outsider spurs a cascade of changes in gene activity in the brain that can last for hours, researchers report in a study of stickleback fish.

  • Deaths

    Walter H. Franke Jr.

  • Kuklinski honored with career achievement award

    James H. Kuklinski, a professor emeritus of political science at Illinois, has been honored with the 2017 Hazel Gaudet Erskine Political Psychology Career Achievement Award, given by the American Political Science Association’s Political Psychology Section.

  • After two fiscal years without a budget, what’s next for the state of Illinois?

    "...fixing the major problems that Illinois has – both in policy and in finances – is going to require the governor to work in cooperation with rather than in opposition to the majorities in the General Assembly, and vice versa"

  • Media advisory: Crime Stoppers raises missing scholar award amount to $50,000

    The reward for information about missing scholar Yingying Zhang’s whereabouts will be raised to $50,000. The increase, requested by Zhang's family, will be announced at a news conference Friday morning.

  • Center for Advanced Study appoints seven new faculty members

    The Center for Advanced Study has appointed seven new members to its permanent faculty – one of the highest forms of academic recognition the University of Illinois campus makes for outstanding scholarship.

  • Researchers develop dynamic templates critical to printable electronics technology

    When it comes to efficiency, sometimes it helps to look to Mother Nature for advice – even in technology as advanced as printable, flexible electronics.

    Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed bio-inspired dynamic templates used to manufacture organic semiconductor materials that produce printable electronics. It uses a process similar to biomineralization – the way that bones and teeth form. This technique is also eco-friendly compared with how conventional electronics are made, which gives the researchers the chance to return the favor to nature.