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  • Minrva project makes library navigation and research easy with app

    Finding the right book in the library these days doesn’t involve a card catalog. In fact, it doesn’t necessarily involve a computer terminal or even a librarian, thanks to a mobile phone application called Minrva, developed by student interns in the undergraduate library’s Technology Prototyping Service (TPS).

  • Peer Education Program promotes dialogue on edgy topics

    There’s perhaps nothing more intimidating in a young adult’s life than leaving the comfy confines of the family nest for the first time and venturing off to college. But University of Illinois students can take comfort knowing a well-developed and well-supported network of fellow students – or “peer educators,” as they’re known on campus – are ready and willing to help them navigate the swirling sea of college life.

  • The Great War: Two courses make conflict meaningful through study abroad and campus expertise

    World War I began in 1914 n the age of biplanes and the Model T – before even radio, much less the Internet. Yet its effects were massive and are still being felt today.

  • Dear Parents: Letter from the Chancellor

    By the time this fall issue of Postmarks is in your hands, we’ll be well into the fall semester at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Nearly 7,000 freshmen and more than 1,300 new transfer students joined the Illinois family in August, setting new records for academic achievement. Together with our returning students, they represent every state in the nation and nearly half the nations in the world. The campus is once again full of the energy, excitement and anticipation of what this year will bring us all.

  • Inspiration. Perspiration. Dedication. Four professors share the Joy of teaching

    Teaching was part of the environment Mark Micale grew up in. His father taught high school history and economics. “There was a lot of talk in the household about schools and classes and students,” Micale said – though it didn’t prompt him, as he started college, to pursue a career in education. Two great college teachers did that.

  • Getting personal: Beckwith assistants may receive more than they give

    All students have their favorite places to escape the stress of finals week. But during a study break last December, senior Shelby Wills found herself in a place she had never imagined: in a swimming pool with a classmate who has a severe physical disability.

  • Study Abroad's top priority is safety for students

    Students participating in the U. of I.’s Study Abroad program say they were thankful for the comprehensive safety training they received on campus before traveling – and more thankful still they never had to employ it in an emergency situation.

  • Students 'SPIN' opportunity with NCSA into internship gold

    Help wanted: On-campus supercomputing behemoth – you know, the place that invented the Web browser – seeks highly motivated student interns to solve some of the world’s most intractable problems.

  • La Colectiva advocates for immigrants, social justice, change

    When Stephanie Mazariegos was a small child, her parents struggled to pay their bills. During the day, her parents worked alternating shifts – her father in a restaurant and as a janitor at a synagogue, her mother cleaning a woman’s home – so that one parent could be at home to care for the children.

  • Practice made perfect: Men make the women's volleyball team better

    If you visit a women’s volleyball practice you might be surprised to see one or two men on the court. There they are, playing against the women, spiking the ball over the net or jumping high to block a shot. These men are practice players, helping the women hone their skills. The men serve as hitters, blockers, motivators or whatever else the team needs.

  • The Greek life was greek to them so they started their own

    Jasmine and Jeniece Baines had no interest in Greek life when they stumbled into the Delta Xi Phi sorority. It happened last fall, when the twin sisters from Country Club Hills, near Chicago, visited a cultural fair at the Illini Union.

  • World champions genetically engineer winning design

    Last summer, as most undergraduates spent their vacation traveling to exotic locales or lounging by the pool, one group of students spent their time on campus in an Institute for Genomic Biology lab, reading papers and creating a probiotic pill that could help prevent heart disease."

  • Forward march! Marching Illini strike up a lasting relationship with practice field

    The University of Illinois Marching Illini provide the soundtrack for a long list of cherished football traditions. Gridiron games wouldn’t be nearly as much fun without the band leading the players out of the tunnel, playing “Imperial March” from “Star Wars” on third downs and of course “Oskee Wow Wow” after every touchdown. But the band is abandoning one lesser-known custom that dates back several generations – and everyone is happy to see this tradition go.

  • Administrative Posts

    Administrative Posts

  • postscripts

    postscripts

  • Dear Parents: Letter from the Chancellor

    By the time you are reading this issue of Postmarks, we’ll be moving into the final months of our academic year. It’s hard to believe that another academic year is coming to a close so quickly. And just as those of us on campus find ourselves in a whirlwind of exams, final projects and preparation for graduation, many of you are considering whether Illinois is the right choice for your child next year. 

  • It takes time and patience: Journalism students apply literary craft to shape stories

    Journalism is often a deadline-driven job. Get the story; get it done.

  • Moon Goons have out-of-this-world experience at NASA

    One high-flying group of engineering students discovered the heavy importance of gravity in a few moments of weightlessness.

  • Four kings of Illini Chess Club make move on elite stage

    Last spring, a Cinderella team from the U. of I. clinched a berth in the Final Four of a major college tournament. But this unheralded group of undergraduates used pawns, bishops and queens – not basketballs – to work their tournament magic.

  • I-Promise delivers support to first-generation college students

    The day Loreal Latimer arrived at the U. of I., her parents dropped her off at Taft-Van Doren residence hall and drove away. Because she graduated fifth in her class at Chicago’s Corliss High School – while leading extracurricular activities and working 17 hours a week at a food service job – the Latimer family figured she could easily navigate a bucolic college campus. 

  • Graphic designers branch out to help develop identity for garden

    Students majoring in graphic design took their skills out of the classroom and into the real world during the spring 2013 semester, when they offered their services to Prosperity Gardens – a community garden in Champaign.

  • IUB: A community that builds community across campus

    One of U. of I. senior Stuti Mehta’s most memorable experiences at Illinois may have been dinner with Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch.

  • Heavy competition

    What began 40 years ago as a civil engineering class project at the U. of I. has grown into an organized annual tradition for engineering students worldwide. 

  • Crime alerts to include follow-up notices on arrests

    When there’s a serious crime within the campus district, the U. of I. police department sends an email to inform the campus community of the situation. Public Safety officials are planning to use the system to share good news as well.

  • Coursera shares U. of I. courses far beyond campus

    As Illinois students took their seats last fall in lecture halls across campus, half a world and several time zones away in New Delhi, Kunwar Apoorva Singh booted up his computer and logged into the Illinois portion of Coursera, the consortium of more than 80 global universities offering free online courses to anyone in the world with access to the Internet.

  • Undergraduate research office off to good start

    It’s been just a year since the Office of the Provost created the Office of Undergraduate Research and students this fall are already seeing tangible results.

  • Smoke-free campus initiative postponed

    The start date for the smoke-free campus initiative has been postponed from this fall to Jan. 1.

  • Administrative Posts

    Administrative Posts

  • postscripts

    postscripts

  • Dear Parents: Letter from the Chancellor

    As you read this issue of Postmarks, we will be near the mid-point of the fall semester. Whether this is your first semester with a son or daughter at Illinois or it is a year of return for your child, we are proud to count them among our students.

  • Shaving cane: Making music by the micrometer

    Amelia Lee wasn’t sure she wanted to attend the University of Illinois. As a serious oboist, her idea of college was an arts institution such as Oberlin Conservatory or the Manhattan School of Music. Her mother, however, wanted Lee to get a more well-rounded education, and with a top-10 ranked music school, the U. of I. suited them both.

  • Animators help fight disease, preserve crops, feed the world

    A farmer in Burkina Faso learns how to safely store his crops. An entrepreneur in India learns how to truck her harvested grain to market. Thanks to student animators at the U. of I., these people and countless others around the world can also see and hear about the symptoms, transmission and treatment of tuberculosis, or how and when to wash their hands to avoid disease.

  • Virtual lab encourages creativity, offers safe place to explore

    Welcome to the virtual lab, a digital re-creation of the nuclear, plasma and radiological engineering (NPRE) undergraduate laboratory. The virtual lab is a detailed first-person video game developed to guide freshmen through basic lab setup and procedure, though it soon could provide a training environment for advanced classes in nuclear engineering and beyond.

  • Service learning project unites special ed students, others

    If curiosity gets the better of the passersby, and they pause to read the card attached to the brightly colored ceramic hearts or hands, they’ll find that the chimes, called Ben’s Bells, are part of a nationwide grassroots movement for spreading kindness. The bells are gifts for whomever happens upon them, but they come with strings attached: Those who pluck the bells from their perches and take them home are volunteering to spread kindness wherever they go.

  • Students 'interns in name only' at Fortune 500 company

    For students looking to become the next Nate Silver, or for those who simply like working with numbers but don’t want to become engineers, the U. of I. offers a little-known but highly esteemed major that’s also very much in-demand in the business world.

  • X students + 1 subject + 1 room = creative and fun teamwork

    If that’s not the math you remember from school, that’s no surprise. But that’s the math they practice and preach through the Illinois Geometry Lab, a new math department initiative now in its fourth semester.

  • Trip to China a welcome new opportunity for future teachers

    The trip that took Bell, Wang and their peers from East Central Illinois to East Asia is part of a new program in the College of Education called the Greater China Initiative, which makes study abroad practicable for undergraduate preservice teachers and provides an opportunity for them to delve into research.

  • Students push for smoke-free campus; planning under way

    The U. of I. student body has spoken, and it says it doesn’t want to inhale secondhand smoke anymore.

  • Tucker named head of undergraduate education, innovation

    Charles Tucker III, the newly installed vice provost for undergraduate education and innovation, is well aware of the challenges of producing a high-quality undergraduate experience.

  • Now trending: Pop, politics, fashion, food among the glitz and glam

    You don’t have to look to the runways of New York City to find the hallmarks of high culture and style. Inside IMPULSE magazine, an independent quarterly publication created by U. of I. students, it’s easy to find glamour and glitz in the heart of Champaign-Urbana.

  • Administrative Posts

    Administrative Posts

  • postscripts

    postscripts

  • Dear Parents

    Dear Parents

  • A summer of fun and GAMES

    The weeklong camp is geared toward high school students with interests in science and engineering. GAMES includes seven camps, each focusing on a particular engineering discipline: aerospace engineering, bioengineering, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, environmental engineering, materials science and robotics.

  • Extreme makeover for Alma Mater under way

    Although the inscription on the base of the Alma Mater statue hasn’t changed, the statue’s location did Aug. 7 as workers lifted the 5-ton sculpture onto a truck and took it to Chicago for extensive conservation work.

  • High-altitude balloon flight inspires 'space geeks' for more

    UI junior Spencer Gore, the founder and director of Space for All, holds onto the payload rigging at the launch site as he addresses the launch crew. Inside the payload housing are devices and cameras filming the action figure "passengers" astride a model of the Starship Enterprise.

  • Lincoln Hall re-created as state-of-the-art instructional facility

    The refurbished Lincoln's bust has been returned, ready for students to start rubbing his nose for luck once again.

  • Neglected classrooms getting much needed renovations

    UI students have access to some of the best professors in the country using the most current data and teaching techniques – but funding challenges have made campus classroom space the final educational frontier.

  • IN THE TRENCHES: Student journalists report from Turkey

    They left for Turkey last May as a group of student reporters. They returned two weeks later as novice foreign correspondents.

  • Nature, culture, education and recreation happily coexist at UI Arboretum

    Gardeners, cross-country runners (and skiers), stressed-out students, soccer players, bug enthusiasts, Japanese tea aficionados, bird watchers, architects and scientists of nearly every stripe find something of value at the UI Arboretum, a vibrant, 57-acre swath of green near the south end of the Urbana-Champaign campus.