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  • Over time, an invasive plant loses its toxic edge

    From left, Adam Davis, of the USDA, Illinois Natural History Survey postdoctoral researcher Richard Lankau and INHS plant ecologist Greg Spyreas found that the invasive garlic mustard plant produces lower levels of a defensive toxin after about three decades in a new location.

    From left, Adam Davis, of the USDA, Illinois Natural History Survey postdoctoral researcher Richard Lankau and INHS plant ecologist Greg Spyreas found that the invasive garlic mustard plant produces lower levels of a defensive toxin after about three decades in a new location.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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  • Editor's note: To contact Rick Lankau, e-mail ralankau@illinois.edu. To reach Greg Spyreas, call 217-819-2059; e-mail spyreas@illinois.edu. The paper, "Evolutionary limits ameliorate the negative impact of an invasive plant," is available online.