blog navigation

blog posts

  • Over time, an invasive plant loses its toxic edge

    From left, Adam Davis, of the USDA, Illinois Natural History Survey postdoctoral researcher Richard Lankau and INHS plant ecologist Greg Spyreas found that the invasive garlic mustard plant produces lower levels of a defensive toxin after about three decades in a new location.

    From left, Adam Davis, of the USDA, Illinois Natural History Survey postdoctoral researcher Richard Lankau and INHS plant ecologist Greg Spyreas found that the invasive garlic mustard plant produces lower levels of a defensive toxin after about three decades in a new location.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

    Images

    • Close

      From left, Adam Davis, of the USDA, Illinois Natural History Survey postdoctoral researcher Richard Lankau and INHS plant ecologist Greg Spyreas found that the invasive garlic mustard plant produces lower levels of a defensive toxin after about three decades in a new location.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

      PrevNext
    • Close

      Garlic mustard produces glucosinolates, pungent compounds that leach into the soil and kill off many soil fungi, especially those native to North America.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

      PrevNext

blog posts