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  • Emotions an overlooked key to whistle-blowing, study says

    Though largely overlooked, tapping into employees' emotions and personal values can produce powerful triggers for calling out wrongdoing in the workplace, U. of I. researchers say.  "If I care deeply about my company, I'm more inclined to defend it and blow the whistle on wrongdoing," said Ruth V. Aguilera, professor of business. "If my job is just a paycheck, I'm more inclined to just say 'whatever' if I see something wrong."

    Though largely overlooked, tapping into employees' emotions and personal values can produce powerful triggers for calling out wrongdoing in the workplace, U. of I. researchers say. "If I care deeply about my company, I'm more inclined to defend it and blow the whistle on wrongdoing," said Ruth V. Aguilera, professor of business. "If my job is just a paycheck, I'm more inclined to just say 'whatever' if I see something wrong."

    Photo courtesy College of Business

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      Though largely overlooked, tapping into employees' emotions and personal values can produce powerful triggers for calling out wrongdoing in the workplace, U. of I. researchers say. "If I care deeply about my company, I'm more inclined to defend it and blow the whistle on wrongdoing," said Ruth V. Aguilera, professor of business. "If my job is just a paycheck, I'm more inclined to just say 'whatever' if I see something wrong."

      Photo courtesy College of Business

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