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  • Semiconductor manufacturing technique holds promise for solar energy

    A flexible array of gallium arsenide solar cells. Gallium arsenide and other compound semiconductors are more efficient than the more commonly used silicon.

    A flexible array of gallium arsenide solar cells. Gallium arsenide and other compound semiconductors are more efficient than the more commonly used silicon.

    Photo courtesy John Rogers

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      A flexible array of gallium arsenide solar cells. Gallium arsenide and other compound semiconductors are more efficient than the more commonly used silicon.

      Photo courtesy John Rogers

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      Illinois researchers have developed a more efficient, lower-cost method of manufacturing compound semiconductors such as gallium arsenide for many electronic device applications, including solar cells. The research team, from the left: professor Xiuling Li, student Ik Su Chun, postdoctoral researchers Sungjin Jo and Jongseung Yoon, and professor John Rogers.

      Photo by Liz Ahlberg

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      A pile of gallium arsenide solar cells manufactured in stacks and then peeled apart layer by layer. They can be integrated into a number of electronic devices.

      Photo courtesy John Rogers

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