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  • Expecting the unexpected does not improve one's chances of seeing it

    By modifying a famous experiment involving a person in a gorilla suit and two teams of people passing basketballs back and forth, Simons demonstrated that expecting the unexpected does not improve one's chances of seeing it.

    By modifying a famous experiment involving a person in a gorilla suit and two teams of people passing basketballs back and forth, Simons demonstrated that expecting the unexpected does not improve one's chances of seeing it.

    Photos provided by Daniel Simons. Photo illustration by Diana Yates.

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  • Editor's note: To contact Daniel Simons, call: 217-333-7628; e-mail: dsimons@illinois.edu. The paper, “Monkeying Around With the Gorillas in Our Midst: Familiarity With an Inattentional-Blindness Task Does Not Improve the Detection of Unexpected Events,” is available online.