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  • Brain gene expression changes when honey bees go the distance

    Researchers can trick a honey bee into thinking she has traveled a longer or shorter distance through a tunnel that leads to a food source by varying the pattern on the tunnel walls. A busy pattern, as seen here, is perceived as a longer distance than a sparse pattern.

    Researchers can trick a honey bee into thinking she has traveled a longer or shorter distance through a tunnel that leads to a food source by varying the pattern on the tunnel walls. A busy pattern, as seen here, is perceived as a longer distance than a sparse pattern.

    Photo provided by Jrgen Tautz from his book "The Buzz About Bees: Biology of a Super Organism."

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  • Editor's note: Gene Robinson directs the Neuroscience Program and is a theme leader at theInstitute for Genomic Biology at Illinois. To contact Robinson, call 217-265-0309; e-mailgenerobi@illinois.edu. The paper, "Distance-responsive genes found in dancing honey bees," is available online.