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  • Brain gene expression changes when honey bees go the distance

    Researchers can trick a honey bee into thinking she has traveled a longer or shorter distance through a tunnel that leads to a food source by varying the pattern on the tunnel walls. A busy pattern, as seen here, is perceived as a longer distance than a sparse pattern.

    Researchers can trick a honey bee into thinking she has traveled a longer or shorter distance through a tunnel that leads to a food source by varying the pattern on the tunnel walls. A busy pattern, as seen here, is perceived as a longer distance than a sparse pattern.

    Photo provided by Jrgen Tautz from his book "The Buzz About Bees: Biology of a Super Organism."

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      Researchers can trick a honey bee into thinking she has traveled a longer or shorter distance through a tunnel that leads to a food source by varying the pattern on the tunnel walls. A busy pattern, as seen here, is perceived as a longer distance than a sparse pattern.

      Photo provided by Jrgen Tautz from his book "The Buzz About Bees: Biology of a Super Organism."

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      The genome is not a static blueprint for life, as was once believed, said University of Illinois neuroscience and entomology professor Gene Robinson, who led the study. "Here is another piece of the world that the genome is responding to that we didn't know about before."

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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