blog navigation

blog posts

  • Fruit flies on meth: Study explores whole-body effects of toxic drug

    In a study of fruit flies, University of Illinois entomology professor Barry Pittendrigh, left; postdoctoral researcher Kent Walters, center; crop sciences professor Manfredo Seufferheld and their colleagues found that meth exposure influenced molecular pathways associated with energy generation, sugar metabolism, sperm cell formation, cell structure, hormones, skeletal muscle and cardiac muscles.

    In a study of fruit flies, University of Illinois entomology professor Barry Pittendrigh, left; postdoctoral researcher Kent Walters, center; crop sciences professor Manfredo Seufferheld and their colleagues found that meth exposure influenced molecular pathways associated with energy generation, sugar metabolism, sperm cell formation, cell structure, hormones, skeletal muscle and cardiac muscles.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

    Images

blog posts

  • Editor's note: To contact Barry Pittendrigh, call 217-417-8930; email pittendr@illinois.edu.

      The study, “Systems-scale Analysis Reveals Pathways Involved in Cellular Response to Methamphetamine,” is available online or from the U. of I. News Bureau.