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  • Fruit flies on meth: Study explores whole-body effects of toxic drug

    In a study of fruit flies, University of Illinois entomology professor Barry Pittendrigh, left; postdoctoral researcher Kent Walters, center; crop sciences professor Manfredo Seufferheld and their colleagues found that meth exposure influenced molecular pathways associated with energy generation, sugar metabolism, sperm cell formation, cell structure, hormones, skeletal muscle and cardiac muscles.

    In a study of fruit flies, University of Illinois entomology professor Barry Pittendrigh, left; postdoctoral researcher Kent Walters, center; crop sciences professor Manfredo Seufferheld and their colleagues found that meth exposure influenced molecular pathways associated with energy generation, sugar metabolism, sperm cell formation, cell structure, hormones, skeletal muscle and cardiac muscles.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      In a study of fruit flies, University of Illinois entomology professor Barry Pittendrigh, left; postdoctoral researcher Kent Walters, center; crop sciences professor Manfredo Seufferheld and their colleagues found that meth exposure influenced molecular pathways associated with energy generation, sugar metabolism, sperm cell formation, cell structure, hormones, skeletal muscle and cardiac muscles.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      The fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) is a useful model organism for studying the whole-body effects of methamphetamine exposure.

      Public domain image by Botaurus

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