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  • U.S., Chinese children differ in commitment to parents over time

    Psychology professor Eva Pomerantz, right, student Lili Qin and their colleagues found that American children's sense of obligation to their parents and desire to please them by doing well in school declined in the seventh and eighth grades, while Chinese students of the same age generally maintained their feelings of obligation and increased their motivation to please their parents with their academic achievements. Qin holds a Chinese greeting card offering the recipient good luck with academics in the new year.

    Psychology professor Eva Pomerantz, right, student Lili Qin and their colleagues found that American children's sense of obligation to their parents and desire to please them by doing well in school declined in the seventh and eighth grades, while Chinese students of the same age generally maintained their feelings of obligation and increased their motivation to please their parents with their academic achievements. Qin holds a Chinese greeting card offering the recipient good luck with academics in the new year.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      Psychology professor Eva Pomerantz, right, student Lili Qin and their colleagues found that American children's sense of obligation to their parents and desire to please them by doing well in school declined in the seventh and eighth grades, while Chinese students of the same age generally maintained their feelings of obligation and increased their motivation to please their parents with their academic achievements. Qin holds a Chinese greeting card offering the recipient good luck with academics in the new year.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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