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  • Ionic liquid catalyst helps turn emissions into fuel

    Chemical and biological engineering professor and chair Paul Kenis and his group teamed up with researchers at startup company Dioxide Materials to develop a catalyst that dramatically reduces the energy requirements of artificial photosynthesis.

    Chemical and biological engineering professor and chair Paul Kenis and his group teamed up with researchers at startup company Dioxide Materials to develop a catalyst that dramatically reduces the energy requirements of artificial photosynthesis.

    Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      Chemical and biological engineering professor and chair Paul Kenis and his group teamed up with researchers at startup company Dioxide Materials to develop a catalyst that dramatically reduces the energy requirements of artificial photosynthesis.

      Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

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      Biofuel production (left) compared to fuel produced via artificial synthesis. Crops takes in CO2, water and sunlight to create biomass, which then is transferred to a refinery to create fuel. In the artificial photosynthesis route, a solar collector or windmill collects energy that powers an electrolyzer, which converts CO2 to a synthesis gas that is piped to a refinery to create fuel.

      Graphic by Dioxide Materials

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